Places to get a matchlock?

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Rick - What you posted is a French 'pulverin'!
Hi Flint

Respectively disagree LOL This is what I call a French pulverin:

Rick
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Snapping Matchlock - Did you see this one by Brian Anderson?


Locks - IMHO a snapping lock is the simplest to make, and a matchlock not that much more difficult. I could provide pictures and rough dimensional drawings.
Flint: That gun has a great early "Renaissance" look to it. Gotta love it.

Rick
 
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Sorry Granth, I have derailed your thread. I guess building is one way to get a matchlock though haha.
While looking for snapping matchlocks, I came across this one in the Hermitage:
Hermitage arquebus.jpg

Instead of having a lock plate, the sear and trigger spring is under the wood. Does anyone know how this works?

As a side note, it looks like a very promising candidate for an original matchlock with a black painted stock, which I was wondering about a couple of months ago.
 
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Yes I know how it works I made a copy years ago , the stock is the 'Lock plate' the button pushes against a spring screwed into the wood on reverse side it in turn pulls out a rod that is the scear nose I did post some pics once will see if I can post better ones later
.Regards Rudyard
 
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Yes I know how it works I made a copy years ago , the stock is the 'Lock plate' the button pushes against a spring screwed into the wood on reverse side it in turn pulls out a rod that is the scear nose I did post some pics once will see if I can post better ones later
.Regards Rudyard
Does that mean there a removable piece of wood over the trigger spring?
 
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No removeable wood ,No need the thickness of the wood is the' Lock plate ' the spring that empowers the serpentine is the curved one screwed directly into the wood just forward of the inlet shield ( might be painted on) mines an inlet of bone I can make another if it suits but you didnt respond to my earlier offer or guestimate . Be same oct brl width & ide say 40 cal or 45 maybe but that's your part .
Regards Rudyard
 
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No removeable wood ,No need the thickness of the wood is the' Lock plate ' the spring that empowers the serpentine is the curved one screwed directly into the wood just forward of the inlet shield ( might be painted on) mines an inlet of bone I can make another if it suits but you didnt respond to my earlier offer or guestimate . Be same oct brl width & ide say 40 cal or 45 maybe but that's your part .
Regards Rudyard
I don’t think I saw that message? Let me double check.
 
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Sorry Granth, I have derailed your thread. I guess building is one way to get a matchlock though haha.
While looking for snapping matchlocks, I came across this one in the Hermitage:
View attachment 177934
Instead of having a lock plate, the sear and trigger spring is under the wood. Does anyone know how this works?

As a side note, it looks like a very promising candidate for an original matchlock with a black painted stock, which I was wondering about a couple of months ago.
Don't worry about it, I love reading what the "matchlock pros" post in this thread.
 
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I wanted a horn and pouch that (in my imagination lol) looked appropriate for my pre-1650 type guns. Something a bit different than the traditional horn shape. So this is what I ended up with: It's sort of a short, fat, stubby horn with the spout in the center and fill plug in the rear.
So … when is a pulverin-shaped powdah horn not a pulverin?
But it has an early 1600's and earlier flavor to it, I think. LOL It has four carrying rings that allows the horn to be carried in either the horizontal or vertical position.
Your words “I think” throw me … as usually you always provide provenance. I’ve never seen you ‘guess’, LOL!

What is your ‘early’ pulverin-like powdah horn based off, both in era, region and/or nationality?

I guess the French pulverin was copied from earlier designs, like this early German or Dutch flat horn for a wheellock (spanner recess on other side).

A3FC795E-3F50-4A1B-A0D6-8235E1E7AE9D.jpeg


It was your use of the (4) ring eyes that looked ‘French’ …
 
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Hi Flint

Well, it seems I was a bit abrupt in my response. My bad. By the way, I often have to guess. (Especially with Eastern market guns LOL).

What I've always termed a pulverin was a container that carried powder with the base container being made of horn and with a spring-actuated, opening/closing valve. But that's the "general" terminology I use for that style of horn. I believe pulverin was originally a French term (?) If not, I stand corrected. Of course the use of the term could easily expand to different nationalities. The colorful horn I posted I just call a powder horn. The style is from my imagination. But you see these shorter, fat horns depicted in various earlier drawings/paintings from earlier periods. The second horn I call a "French" style pulverin, I based on this information:

The Rifle Shoppe, Inc. - French Pulverin Powder Horn Set (547)

The flat horn you posted I would also call it a pulvrin. But the early, triangular-shaped powder containers with the wood sides I would not. But maybe that's just me. LOL

Rick
 
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Here is an original stag horn powder flask from my collection. It's still in good working condition. The late Michael Tommer was able to date this piece exactly as made in Nurnburg between 1570-1575. I guess you could call this a pulverin (?) But I still call it a stag-horn flask. Maybe the difference in terminology comes from military versus sporting use ? Don't know.

Rick
English Doglock Pistol 010 (Medium).jpg
 

toot

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Here is an original stag horn powder flask from my collection. It's still in good working condition. The late Michael Tommer was able to date this piece exactly as made in Nurnburg between 1570-1575. I guess you could call this a pulverin (?) But I still call it a stag-horn flask. Maybe the difference in terminology comes from military versus sporting use ? Don't know.

RickView attachment 178150
isn't PULVIERN FRENCH for powder?
 
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LOL Treestalker!!
Anyone can make a matchlock.
Just look Closely at Michael's threads, such as "A Matchlock chronology" and study all the bits.
No machine tools, just a file and blacksmiths hammer and learn how to harden wearing areas, and that's it.
For woodwork, get an old plank, and remover Everything that doesn't look like the pictures you are using for reference.
saw, axe and drawknife, and a scraper maybe.
Barrel, either purchased or homemade. Home made gets away from the factory look.
Don't use measuring tools, just eyeball all parts critically.

There, that was a short book wasn't it?!

Just study all the parts, until as soon as you look at what you are making, you will know if it looks right or wrong.
Develop a 16th century mind for when doing the work.
No micrometer, no digitals, no calipres, just eye and hand co-ordination and a measuring stick.

That last part is my second book on the subject.

I would seriously be delighted to see more people making their own. It is Not beyond you if you have eyes and hands and study originals.
Be your own most severe critic!
My grandfather always said, "It'll do"... Won't do!" Do your best .
That's book three.
Thank you!
 
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Thanks Pukka and Rudyard. I love the dragons some of my folks are Welsh and I have a Welsh flag with that wonderful lizard on it. Can't wait to get a pole for it out front. Somebody in Fayetteville has a large French tricolor displayed and it looks great. My first effort at mlock looks kind of Spanish with a 30" oct/round barrel in 24 guage smooth and a stock of Ozark walnut I chopped out from scratch. Still working on the lock guts, great fun! Geo.
Hi Geo- you mentioned Fayetteville, as in Fayetteville, North Carolina? If so are you around there?
Bob
 
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Here is an original stag horn powder flask from my collection. It's still in good working condition. The late Michael Tommer was able to date this piece exactly as made in Nurnburg between 1570-1575. I guess you could call this a pulverin (?) But I still call it a stag-horn flask. Maybe the difference in terminology comes from military versus sporting use ? Don't know.

RickView attachment 178150
Really interesting! The Doglock pistol as well. How did you come upon the pistol holster? It appears to have a belt.( I had only seen these on saddles in old paintings). Thanks!
 
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Really interesting! The Doglock pistol as well. How did you come upon the pistol holster? It appears to have a belt.( I had only seen these on saddles in old paintings). Thanks!
Hi Pathfinder

PISTOL: The pistol is a 1640ish style built from TRS kit #627. Assembled by Mike Brooks some years ago. It's light weight and balances wonderful.

HOLSTER: I call this a shoulder bucket. It does not copy any known original and just comes from my imagination. The idea was that many of the early wheellock and similar pistols of the period were large, with some having longer barrels, and somewhat cumbersome overall. This would likely be one of the reasons they were carried individually or in pairs inside leather buckets mounted on the horse saddle as you mention. But for foot use in the field there doesn't seem to be any practical way to carry some of these larger/longer pistols. Even a belt hook didn't seem practical in this case. So I came up with the idea of a shoulder style bucket that could carry the pistol badric style across the back of the upper torso - like a sword baldric. This way, the pistol is protected from the elements and leaves the waist belt and/or sash unobstructed for other items. Of course, it can be used for any early type pistol. Just another one of those unnecessary but fun items. I commissioned this to be made by T.C. Albert from my idea. He did a great job and even used it in one of his articles for Muzzleloader Magazine some years ago. I posted this here on the Forum some years ago and can post/send you the original Thread if you like.

Rick
 
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Hi Pathfinder

PISTOL: The pistol is a 1640ish style built from TRS kit #627. Assembled by Mike Brooks some years ago. It's light weight and balances wonderful.

HOLSTER: I call this a shoulder bucket. It does not copy any known original and just comes from my imagination. The idea was that many of the early wheellock and similar pistols of the period were large, with some having longer barrels, and somewhat cumbersome overall. This would likely be one of the reasons they were carried individually or in pairs inside leather buckets mounted on the horse saddle as you mention. But for foot use in the field there doesn't seem to be any practical way to carry some of these larger/longer pistols. Even a belt hook didn't seem practical in this case. So I came up with the idea of a shoulder style bucket that could carry the pistol badric style across the back of the upper torso - like a sword baldric. This way, the pistol is protected from the elements and leaves the waist belt and/or sash unobstructed for other items. Of course, it can be used for any early type pistol. Just another one of those unnecessary but fun items. I commissioned this to be made by T.C. Albert from my idea. He did a great job and even used it in one of his articles for Muzzleloader Magazine some years ago. I posted this here on the Forum some years ago and can post/send you the original Thread if you like.

Rick
Thanks for the follow up Rick. Mike Brooks has made many many beautiful long guns and pistols. It would be a proud man to own one.
I like the holster a lot. I can understand your reasoning to have one made. I have a French Model 1733 Dragoon pistol I built that sports a 15” barrel. Not something to stick in a coat pocket for carrying around when I am taking it out for shooting and such.
Thanks for sharing the pic of your cool stuff 🙂
 
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Now to me, that matchlock from Lodgewood is a tad over-priced for what it is, or for what one would have received (even caliber) if Brian had made you one, however ... beggars can't be choosers, however ... also admittedly, BP market prices are indeed UP all over! Now I do know of the builder Steve Krolick, and have other BP arms he has built, and they are built very, very well. Note the description says it is a snapping matchlck, but it isn't - you pull the 'tiller' or bottom lever leg of the serpentine to fire it.
When I emailed them about a new build of this gun, it seems like they actually just put up the wrong description. They had also done a snapping matchlock. They sent a picture, but I do not know if it would be gauche to share a picture from an email conversation. The arquebus with an unsprung serpentine resembles handgonnes and arquebuses in painting from the end of the 15th century, but the snapping piece didn’t match anything I was familiar with.
 
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