Pistol/revolver of choice...........

Discussion in 'Handguns' started by ebiggs1, Jul 23, 2010.

Help Support Muzzle Loading Forum by donating:

  1. Jul 24, 2010 #21

    denster

    denster

    denster

    40 Cal. MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2006
    Messages:
    378
    Likes Received:
    28
    Cavalry or Infantry?
    Cavalry as many Remingtons as my horse could carry and a good saber.
    Infantry a musket one Remington and a good sharp bayonet for when they got inside of ten yards.
     
  2. Jul 24, 2010 #22

    poordevil

    poordevil

    poordevil

    50 Cal.

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,251
    Likes Received:
    2
    A little before the Civil War, 1850's New Mexico. John Cerimony(?) rode the Dead Mans Journey with 4 Colt Dragoons! He got away from a bunch of Apachie's using all 4.

    P
     
  3. Jul 25, 2010 #23

    B. Miller

    B. Miller

    B. Miller

    40 Cal.

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2007
    Messages:
    155
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would probably go with a Whitney Navy Revolver. Designed by Beals as was the Remy but a 36 caliber. The R&S just does not fit well in my hand.
     
  4. Jul 26, 2010 #24

    Dave Rosenthal

    Dave Rosenthal

    Dave Rosenthal

    70 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2006
    Messages:
    4,471
    Likes Received:
    0
    3rd Model Dragoon with 45 grains on the right hip, and a 1860 Army on the left in a cross-draw (right-hand hip holster, worn on the left hip). The Walker is a little too susceptible to cap fragments, but for long-range harassment-fire situations to pin somebody down (or hit them) it can't be beat!

    Dave
     
  5. Jul 26, 2010 #25

    rafterob

    rafterob

    rafterob

    62 Cal.

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2007
    Messages:
    3,085
    Likes Received:
    24
    Carrying a spare loaded cylinder in a belt pouch under combat situations is probably the least risk one would be taking at the time. I agree though that the reality of having time to switch out a cylinder in close quarter combat is nill. After the pistol(s) were shot out it was, bayonet, saber, dagger, hand to hand hell.
     
  6. Jul 26, 2010 #26

    ebiggs1

    ebiggs1

    ebiggs1

    69 Cal.

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2009
    Messages:
    3,893
    Likes Received:
    0
    Who knows what will happen under combat situations but would you not want that option? I can change my Remington cylinder pretty quickly and/or not have that ability at all? I agree with everybody that the 1851 Colt Navy is the best handling and pointing gun, possibly ever built. Exception being the 1908 Luger, maybe. The Colt had to have something, even though the Remington is a superior design, as the Colt was the most liked and most popular.
    Boy I’ll bet that will start it!
     
  7. Jul 26, 2010 #27

    Kevin Makel

    Kevin Makel

    Kevin Makel

    36 Cal.

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2009
    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    0
    Same for me, as much as I'd love to say "Walker" as my answer the truth is the '51 is my choice.
     
  8. Jul 26, 2010 #28

    Celt5494

    Celt5494

    Celt5494

    45 Cal.

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2008
    Messages:
    523
    Likes Received:
    0
    Le Matt................
     
  9. Jul 26, 2010 #29

    shadowhawk

    shadowhawk

    shadowhawk

    32 Cal.

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2010
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    i have both a remmy and colt. put more shots through them then i can remember. i like the colt but it has one big problem. when the cap fires sometimes it will lossen enough to fall off with the next hammer cock. it then can and sometimes does drop down in to the space between the hammer and body. you pull the trigger hammer falls smashes cap remains and jams hammer. sometimes you can force the hammer back sometimes you can,t. so you have to take it apart. to me that makes the remmy better. i like them both but have alot less problems with my remy.( other then the inerds on both are worn out and needing replaced)
    :wink:
     
  10. Jul 26, 2010 #30

    cowpoke1955

    cowpoke1955

    cowpoke1955

    58 Cal.

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2006
    Messages:
    2,090
    Likes Received:
    0
    I agree with shadowhawk. The Colt design allows spent caps to fall into the workings and jamming everything. This has happened to my 1860. My 1858 Remington never had such a problem. Being able to switch cylinders is a bonus. In combat, you need something that is RELIABLE! :thumbsup:
     
  11. Jul 28, 2010 #31

    laufer

    laufer

    laufer

    45 Cal.

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2005
    Messages:
    524
    Likes Received:
    0
    don't you need to survive the first round of exchange in order to be able to reload?
    dragoons, several!
     
  12. Jul 29, 2010 #32

    mukluk

    mukluk

    mukluk

    32 Cal.

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2007
    Messages:
    45
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'd stick to what I'm comfortable with, my Walker backed up with an 1860.
     
  13. Jul 29, 2010 #33

    pargent

    pargent

    pargent

    62 Cal.

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2008
    Messages:
    2,824
    Likes Received:
    2
    if you shoot the colt in an 1850s fashion you wont get caps jamming under the hammer,(shoot strong hand only a one hand hold for want of a better description, as you cock the hammer with your thumb roll your hand clock wise,at full cock roll back upright sight and fire.)i have not dropped acap under the hammer since learning this tech..our modern remingtons (repos) are made stronger in the front frame sections than originals. :hatsoff:
     
  14. Jul 29, 2010 #34

    redwing

    redwing

    redwing

    58 Cal.

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2004
    Messages:
    2,104
    Likes Received:
    0
    The little 51' Navy is the favorite of target shooters. It was also favored because it was light and small. The fact is the damn thing would not shoot thru a Union soldiers wool coat. The 1860 Army was needed in serious war fare, it was all so a fair horse killer. The Colt system however was poor. The arbor would bind the cylinder and the damn thing was useless. Men who liked Colts carried 4 or 5 of them at one time. In modern time they would have been the subject of a recall. The 58' Remington was closer to being a good combat weapon. The 58' however would also bind up. The best and most modern of its day was the Rogers & Spencer. The R&S will not bind and is a very tough service pistol. The design is used today by B/P shooting teams. DPS R&S sells for $1,300.00. You can of course get the Euroarms for much less. Ruger copied this gun when they made the ROA. Colt used the R&S flange in the Peace Maker. It was ahead of its time. This gun did see service during the cartridge era by the USMC during the Moro War. I would choose the Rogers & Spencer.
     
  15. Jul 29, 2010 #35

    redwing

    redwing

    redwing

    58 Cal.

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2004
    Messages:
    2,104
    Likes Received:
    0
    [​IMG]

    The Roger & Spencer is also a very accurate six Gun. The gun uses a .457 ball or bullet. The chambers allow for a heavy charge. This target was fired at 25 yds. from a sand bag rest six shots. The load was 40 grs. 3F Wano a felt wad lubed with BP Plus a .457 ball poured from range lead.
     
  16. Jul 29, 2010 #36

    lonehunter

    lonehunter

    lonehunter

    58 Cal.

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2009
    Messages:
    2,106
    Likes Received:
    0
    Nice shootin! :v
     
  17. Jul 29, 2010 #37

    ebiggs1

    ebiggs1

    ebiggs1

    69 Cal.

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2009
    Messages:
    3,893
    Likes Received:
    0
    I totally agree with you. But I find it curious that the best design often does not turn into the most successful product.
     
  18. Jul 29, 2010 #38

    redwing

    redwing

    redwing

    58 Cal.

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2004
    Messages:
    2,104
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well it did turn out well. The gun was invented at the end of the C&B era. The cartridge guns that followed used the Rogers & Spencer improvments. The modern revlovers of today are using these improvments.Had it not been for R&S the Colt Peacemaker may not have been as popular as it later was. Colt made guns for years but was never able to come up with a powder deflector to protect the arbor from frezzing up. The fine old Remingtons and most of the others went away by 1900. None of them left the mark on handguns that Rogers & Spencer did. Ruger paid R&S a final tribute when they copied it for the ROA. Even down to the .457 caliber.:thumbsup:
     
  19. Jul 29, 2010 #39

    paulmarcone

    paulmarcone

    paulmarcone

    40 Cal.

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2007
    Messages:
    224
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would go into combat with my Walker. Reliable -- almost never misfires and it's accurate as all get out.

    And the damage done and shock value will hopefully send the enemy a runnin' :shocked2:
     
  20. Jul 30, 2010 #40

    freekforge

    freekforge

    freekforge

    45 Cal.

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    788
    Likes Received:
    1
    ID GO WITH THE 1858 REM. ACCURATE AND QUICK CYLINDER SWAP ( JUST GOT ONE )
     

Share This Page

arrow_white