Pietta 1860 Army Question

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TrapperDude

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I just put in an order for a Pietta 1860 Army with the cuts and screws for attaching a stock. I don't have a question about the stock, but I do have a question about the scrollwork on the cylinder. If it's an Army revolver, why is there a naval scene engraved on the cylinder? Were revolvers actually engraved so back in the day?
 

TrapperDude

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So, my new revolver arrived, today, and it looks pretty nicely done. There's a weird mark across one of the lands that looks like a machinist scraped it lightly, but I don't know if it will affect accuracy--it might even smooth out with use.

The Pietta instruction manual shows a max Pyrodex loading of 28 grains, as opposed to a max of 35 grains for black powder. I have a good amount of Pyrodex I bought for use with my Remington, and I've had good results with it, so I'll save my real black powder for my flintlock. Why is 28 grains, a lower amount, recommended for Pyrodex? Why is it such an oddball amount? The spout on my flask is 30 grains, the amount Uberti recommends for my Remington. 28 grains means I'll have to use the measure, which is not terribly convenient.
 
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Pyrodex is a little hotter than real BP in similar granulations. What cal is the 1860?
.44? Pietta produces many unusual combinations. The naval engraving on an
Army revolver- Ill have to check that further. I understand the 1851 engraving.
I have held an original 1860 without such roll engraving.
 

TrapperDude

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Pyrodex is a little hotter than real BP in similar granulations. What cal is the 1860?
.44? Pietta produces many unusual combinations. The naval engraving on an
Army revolver- Ill have to check that further. I understand the 1851 engraving.
I have held an original 1860 without such roll engraving.
Mine is the .44 with the scrolling.
 
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So, my new revolver arrived, today, and it looks pretty nicely done. There's a weird mark across one of the lands that looks like a machinist scraped it lightly, but I don't know if it will affect accuracy--it might even smooth out with use.

The Pietta instruction manual shows a max Pyrodex loading of 28 grains, as opposed to a max of 35 grains for black powder. I have a good amount of Pyrodex I bought for use with my Remington, and I've had good results with it, so I'll save my real black powder for my flintlock. Why is 28 grains, a lower amount, recommended for Pyrodex? Why is it such an oddball amount? The spout on my flask is 30 grains, the amount Uberti recommends for my Remington. 28 grains means I'll have to use the measure, which is not terribly convenient.
Whatever amount of pyro will fit under a ball or bullet is the max load. Pyro is slightly hotter than Goex but about the same as Swiss. Maybe they’re measuring by weight?
 
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The scratch across the lands will I think wear with use. Which brings up
a point importers make. They(Cimmaron,Taylors etc) claim that they
get a finer grade of quality control from the makers due to larger
orders,inspections and business connection/respect. Who, may I ask
was your importer?
 

CaptainKirk

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28gr Pyrodex is lawyerspeak. I've regularly shot literally hundreds of loads either 30 or 35gr of Pyrodex P out of my Army. Pyrodex is to be measured grain for grain by volume the same as 3F black powder. If it's not a brasser, go shoot it and have fun.
 

Gee Dog

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Agreed. Thirty grains Pyo P or any powder is standard in steel frame 44's. More is just as good. Been shooting that for decades. The guns are in perfect shape. The Cabellas/Pietta print outs are nonsense.

Brass frames are the big exception. Only Italians ever made a brass .44. Don't know why anyone would buy such a thing.
 
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Hard ordinace grade brass is strong. I had a hundred buck brass cheapie 1858
NMA from flea market- have put hundreds of rounds down range before gifting
it away. Stayed tight and right. Sure, thousand rounds of maxed T-7 might
bring some small stretch-- but if it is Pietta brass IT IS STRONG do not fret.
Use recommended BP loads and it will last like steel, in my experience. Anyone
who just hates them, I'll pay shipping--send them on.
 

CaptainKirk

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Sure, thousand rounds of maxed T-7 might
bring some small stretch-- but if it is Pietta brass IT IS STRONG do not fret.

Er...I've seen Pietta frames damaged by overcharging with Pyrodex and black powder. To be on the safe side, I wouldn't recommend ever exeeding 25gr in a .44, 20 in a .36. Recommended loads would be 18-20 in a .44 and 15-18 in a .36 to avoid damage. This doesn't mean you still can't have a ton of fun, and save powder in the long run. Triple Seven loads might be wise to reduce a few grains on.
 

SPQR70AD

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Hard ordinace grade brass is strong. I had a hundred buck brass cheapie 1858
NMA from flea market- have put hundreds of rounds down range before gifting
it away. Stayed tight and right. Sure, thousand rounds of maxed T-7 might
bring some small stretch-- but if it is Pietta brass IT IS STRONG do not fret.
Use recommended BP loads and it will last like steel, in my experience. Anyone
who just hates them, I'll pay shipping--send them on.
I have the same brass 1858 and fired way over 1000 times and do not see any difference. it is like when I bought it. with the solid top strap on the 1858 there is no problem with brass. open top colt maybe
 

TrapperDude

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Whatever amount of pyro will fit under a ball or bullet is the max load. Pyro is slightly hotter than Goex but about the same as Swiss. Maybe they’re measuring by weight?
That's a good point, but I have no way of knowing. All I know is 30gr of Pyrodex is fine according to the manual for my Uberti Remington, so it would make sense for it to be the same with my Colt.
The scratch across the lands will I think wear with use. Which brings up
a point importers make. They(Cimmaron,Taylors etc) claim that they
get a finer grade of quality control from the makers due to larger
orders,inspections and business connection/respect. Who, may I ask
was your importer?
Mine came from Taylor's. It kind of surprised me. I was expecting an actual Pietta box the same way my Uberti came in an actual Uberti box. Of course, the packaging from Taylor's was nicer than Uberti's packaging.
28gr Pyrodex is lawyerspeak. I've regularly shot literally hundreds of loads either 30 or 35gr of Pyrodex P out of my Army. Pyrodex is to be measured grain for grain by volume the same as 3F black powder. If it's not a brasser, go shoot it and have fun.
I like that answer. It matches my own thoughts on the matter. 2 grains extra are pretty slim, and as I mentioned above, there's no reason I can think of that 30 grains would cause a problem with my 1860 when the manual for my Remington says 30 grains is okay.
 

CaptainKirk

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I have the same brass 1858 and fired way over 1000 times and do not see any difference. it is like when I bought it. with the solid top strap on the 1858 there is no problem with brass. open top colt maybe
Top strap strength on the 1858 Remington is an urban legend. The massive arbor on the Colts is actually as strong, if not stronger than the top strap Remmy design. Ask Mike Brackett (Goon's Gun Works) about that one and you will get an education. Maybe he'll jump in here?
 
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I just put in an order for a Pietta 1860 Army with the cuts and screws for attaching a stock. I don't have a question about the stock, but I do have a question about the scrollwork on the cylinder. If it's an Army revolver, why is there a naval scene engraved on the cylinder? Were revolvers actually engraved so back in the day?
Yeah, plus the "Army" moniker was just sort of a casual trade name, not a specific application term.
 
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I have the same brass 1858 and fired way over 1000 times and do not see any difference. it is like when I bought it. with the solid top strap on the 1858 there is no problem with brass. open top colt maybe
These are interesting comments from guys who actually used them; You've done a good thing for people who thought, (as I did) that the brass ones "stretched". Thank you. Also, even the good old Dixie catalog for years has had a comment in there that they may stretch a bit. Your comments are appreciated, and may cause someone to pick up a 'brassie' that would otherwise be neglected.
 
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I have the same brass 1858 and fired way over 1000 times and do not see any difference. it is like when I bought it. with the solid top strap on the 1858 there is no problem with brass. open top colt maybe
I had not heard the term, 'hard ordnance brass' but it makes sense. I'm sure there's many different mixes of metals to go into brass; it can't all be soft like for some non-gun use. Thanks.
 
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Hard ordinace grade brass is strong. I had a hundred buck brass cheapie 1858
NMA from flea market- have put hundreds of rounds down range before gifting
it away. Stayed tight and right. Sure, thousand rounds of maxed T-7 might
bring some small stretch-- but if it is Pietta brass IT IS STRONG do not fret.
Use recommended BP loads and it will last like steel, in my experience. Anyone
who just hates them, I'll pay shipping--send them on.
I've always kind of wanted one of the Confederate-type pistol replicas, but all have brass receivers. You have made me re-think this! :)
 

TrapperDude

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I've always kind of wanted one of the Confederate-type pistol replicas, but all have brass receivers. You have made me re-think this! :)
I did some reading on Confederate revolvers, and the Dance revolvers appear to have been Confederate clones of the Colt 1860 Army, made of steel. If you still want a Confederate revolver of steel, that might be a good way to go.
 

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