Pickles ?

Discussion in 'Camp Cooking' started by Carbon 6, Aug 23, 2019.

Help Support Muzzle Loading Forum by donating:

  1. Aug 23, 2019 #1

    Carbon 6

    Carbon 6

    Carbon 6

    58 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2018
    Messages:
    2,242
    Likes Received:
    825
    Anyone got anything on pickles of the era? References, recipes, etc. ?
     
  2. Aug 23, 2019 #2

    Treestalker

    Treestalker

    Treestalker

    45 Cal. MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2014
    Messages:
    1,098
    Likes Received:
    196
    Location:
    Arkansas Ozarks
    Don't know how far back they go but the oldest gardener in the Williamson Settlement I grew up in back in the '60's, Monk Stanton, used to make a type of mustard pickles. Man they were good, kind of a forerunner or contemporary of the dill pickle? I understand they go back to Germany and also the Pennsylvania Dutch senfgurken. I believe pickles go back to the Great wall of China, and should be pc enough for us! Ich lieber!
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2019
  3. Aug 23, 2019 #3

    tenngun

    tenngun

    tenngun

    Cannon

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2008
    Messages:
    10,122
    Likes Received:
    1,083
    Location:
    Republic mo
    (Left eye brow up) hmm.
    I used to raise a big garden and make lots of jars of pickles each year. I grew a chiefly sized body over the years but on savory food. I’m not much of a sweet eater so I tended to dill and dill and jalapeño.
    I’ve got the Tavern cook book of Williamsburg, and a big stack of Townsend’s calendars. I thought a pickle recipe would be easy to find... not so much.
    Townsend has eggs and pearl onions. And I found cucc salads but not a pickled Cucc.
    Cucumber was raised in ancient Egypt and popular in Rome. Lots of vinegar and lots of soaking stuff in salt and vinegar to keep was common.
    But... everything I see on pickles is nineteenth century or later and most depression era.
     
  4. Aug 24, 2019 #4

    BullRunBear

    BullRunBear

    BullRunBear

    45 Cal.

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2007
    Messages:
    743
    Likes Received:
    36
    I can't point to specific recipes but making sauerkraut, a lacto fermantation process, has been around for centuries. The same process was used for pickling other veggies. I wonder if the process was so common it didn't need to be mentioned in recipe books.

    Jeff
     
    tenngun likes this.
  5. Aug 24, 2019 #5

    tenngun

    tenngun

    tenngun

    Cannon

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2008
    Messages:
    10,122
    Likes Received:
    1,083
    Location:
    Republic mo
    Old cook books are short on detail, reading them one had to know the basics first to use the info. I would lean to your thinking that on average most people learned to pickle stuff as older children or young teens
     
  6. Aug 24, 2019 #6

    Nyckname

    Nyckname

    Nyckname

    40 cal - b

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2019
    Messages:
    373
    Likes Received:
    145
  7. Aug 24, 2019 #7

    Loyalist Dave

    Loyalist Dave

    Loyalist Dave

    Cannon MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    Messages:
    8,109
    Likes Received:
    835
    Location:
    People's Republic of Maryland
    The below "pickles" may be found in The Cook and Confectioner's Dictionary (1724) by John Nott

    Artichoke
    Asparagus
    French Beans [string beans]
    Codlins (small unripe apple)
    Conger [eel]
    Cucumbers
    Elder [flower] Buds
    Grapes
    Hop-buds
    Mallows
    Mushrooms
    Pigeon
    Plums
    Salmon
    Trout
    Turnep
    Walnuts

    I noted that they don't show pickled hard-boiled eggs, nor pickled peaches.

    Fifty years later, in the 1774 edition of Hannah Glasse's The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy, there is an entire chapter on pickles,
    Walnuts
    Cucumbers
    Gerkins
    Asparagus
    Peaches (there they are)
    Radish
    French Beans
    Cauliflower
    Beets
    White Plums
    Nectarines and Apricots
    Onion
    Lemons
    Mushrooms
    Codlings
    Red Currants
    Grapes
    Fennel
    Barberries
    Cabbage
    Pippins
    Oysters, cockels, and mussels
    Artichokes

    LD
     
    tenngun likes this.
  8. Aug 24, 2019 #8

    BullRunBear

    BullRunBear

    BullRunBear

    45 Cal.

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2007
    Messages:
    743
    Likes Received:
    36
    Love those Townsend cooking videos although I learned to avoid them when hungry. Be careful, they get addictive. The recent series on quill pens, ink, paper and posting letters was great.

    LD: Thanks for the list of pickles covered in those cookbooks from the 18th century. I should order the Hannah Glasse book. Jon Townsend uses it for a lot of his videos. I have several of the books printed by Townsend and they are good quality paperbacks.

    Jeff
     
    tenngun likes this.
  9. Aug 24, 2019 #9

    Carbon 6

    Carbon 6

    Carbon 6

    58 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2018
    Messages:
    2,242
    Likes Received:
    825
    I suspect the advent of canning has a lot to do with the number of recipes.

    I like to experiment, so I took a large overgrown kohlrabi diced it up and pickled it like you would bread and butter pickles.
    I tried them today, they were excellent.
     
  10. Aug 24, 2019 #10

    Loyalist Dave

    Loyalist Dave

    Loyalist Dave

    Cannon MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    Messages:
    8,109
    Likes Received:
    835
    Location:
    People's Republic of Maryland
    You're slaying me, bro... :D
    Can't find kohlrabi in my area, and I missed putting in a garden this year.
    I do have a good supply of zucchini spears, pickled, and beet-eggs. I eat a lot of different pickles each week, and when I make them on my own I used cider vinegar as part of the pickle juice. Skeeters don't bother me..., part of that I think is the pickles.

    LD
     
  11. Aug 25, 2019 #11

    Carbon 6

    Carbon 6

    Carbon 6

    58 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2018
    Messages:
    2,242
    Likes Received:
    825
    I have 2 more the size of large muskmelons, they are definitely going to get pickled. They are awesome. I can give you a recipe if you want.

    There might be some science behind vinegar repelling mosquitoes.
     
  12. Aug 26, 2019 #12

    Carbon 6

    Carbon 6

    Carbon 6

    58 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2018
    Messages:
    2,242
    Likes Received:
    825
    In 1699 John Evelyn wrote the book,
    Acetaria A Discourse of Sallets
    In it he writes:


    " Cucumbers. Take the Gorkems, or smaller Cucumbers; put them into Rape-Vinegar, and boyl, and cover them so close, as none of the Vapour may issue forth; and also let them stand till the next day: Then boil them in fresh White-Wine Vinegar, with large Mace, Nutmeg, Ginger, white Pepper, and a little Salt, (according to discretion) straining the former Liquor from the Cucumbers; and so place them in a Jarr, or wide mouthed Glass, laying a litle Dill and Fennel between each Rank; and covering all with the fresh scalding-hot Pickle, keep all close, and repeat it daily, till you find them sufficiently green ."
     
    tenngun and Treestalker like this.
  13. Aug 26, 2019 #13

    Carbon 6

    Carbon 6

    Carbon 6

    58 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2018
    Messages:
    2,242
    Likes Received:
    825
    From The Compleat Cook
    Published in 1658

    To Pickle Cucumbers.

    Put them in an Earthen Vessel, lay first a Lay of Salt and Dill, then a Lay of Cucumbers, and so till they be all Layed, put in some Mace and whole pepper, and some Fennel-seed according to direction, then fill it up with Beer-Vinegar, and a clean board and a stone upon it to keepe them within the pickle, and so keep them close covered, and if the Vinegar is black, change them into fresh.
     
  14. Aug 26, 2019 #14

    Treestalker

    Treestalker

    Treestalker

    45 Cal. MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2014
    Messages:
    1,098
    Likes Received:
    196
    Location:
    Arkansas Ozarks
    In 1610 the British herbalist John Gerard came out with an herbal in which he stated that the Capsicum peppers 'Killeth dogs'. I've eaten pickled jalapenos for years and when I moved from East Texas to the mountains here in Arkansas, I found the folks here hardly eat anything hot, and what they rejoice in 'Mexican' food is as bland as clabber.
     
  15. Aug 26, 2019 #15

    tenngun

    tenngun

    tenngun

    Cannon

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2008
    Messages:
    10,122
    Likes Received:
    1,083
    Location:
    Republic mo
    Found that same thing, grew up in a largely Hispanic and Navajo town and had spicy food. My mother was from Rhode Island where there was a law against flavor in food, but my dad grew up in Wisconsin with a half German mother and neighbors were Poles Sweads and Norwegian.
    He went right after Mexican food and enjoined strong flavors.
    I moved to Arkansas and was greeted with very plain tasteless food.... but at least I could get spices and my dad made sure I leaned to cook as a kid.
     
    Nyckname likes this.
  16. Aug 26, 2019 #16

    BullRunBear

    BullRunBear

    BullRunBear

    45 Cal.

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2007
    Messages:
    743
    Likes Received:
    36
    Tenngun, Had to laugh about your mom and Rhode Island. Growing up there in the 1950s and 60s the food had plenty of flavor (usually involving coffee, inside RI humor) but I can't recall any hot spicy food at all. Things may have changed since then. I don't know if it's my childhood but I cannot tolerate hot peppers or any hot spices. Even Heinz ketchup makes me sweat. But I enjoy vinegars and lemons in amounts that make most people pucker for a week. Maybe all those New York style kosher dill pickles and Mediterannean pickled veggies I grew up eating (staying on topic) set me up. :D

    Jeff
     
  17. Aug 27, 2019 #17

    tenngun

    tenngun

    tenngun

    Cannon

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2008
    Messages:
    10,122
    Likes Received:
    1,083
    Location:
    Republic mo
    Well it was a tease as New England gave us fin and haddie, Boston baked beans and brown bread, annadama bread, and seafood the worst cook couldn’t screw up.
    And most everyone has fond memories of moms home cooking, but God rest her soul, boiled potatoes was the upper limit of her cooking skill.
    Luckily my dad was good and taught me and my brothers.we cooked most of the meals. I think my dad did it in self defense.
     
  18. Aug 27, 2019 #18

    Carbon 6

    Carbon 6

    Carbon 6

    58 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2018
    Messages:
    2,242
    Likes Received:
    825
    One of the pickle recipes I came across was for pickled radish pods,
    Definitely going to try that next year.
     

Share This Page

arrow_white