• Friends, our 2nd Amendment rights are always under attack and the NRA has been a constant for decades in helping fight that fight.

    We have partnered with the NRA to offer you a discount on membership and Muzzleloading Forum gets a small percentage too of each membership, so you are supporting both the NRA and us.

    Use this link to sign up please; https://membership.nra.org/recruiters/join/XR045103

Picked up a pile of "chunks"(or probably not!)

Muzzleloading Forum

Help Support Muzzleloading Forum:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.

RedOneFive

40 Cal
Joined
May 25, 2015
Messages
105
Reaction score
229
Location
Nebraska
I bought out a friend's estate after everyone else was done(they were after those tailpipe kind of things).
5 of the BP rifles included were these super hefty built target guns.
He ran the local nmlra stuff for several years and I belive they did a lot of chunk matches. The longest is a. 40(42") then (36")45,50,50,54... All have the large Siler lock and green mountain barrels except a Douglas on one of the 50s..
I can't keep them all, but I've got to pick one for me to keep and shoot to honor my friend. Hard choice to make, but what should be taken into consideration when picking a rifle like these?.. It's bigger bore better in a chunk match? More length? The 40 is long and 1"across, but the 50 with a green mountain barrel is 1⅛ across and really steady offhand if you can hold it! A whole new realm to me.
After I choose I'm going to need a little help in valuation on the rest as well.. Thanks in advance for the advice!
Joe
20240520_210133.jpg
20240520_210138.jpg
20240520_210146.jpg
 
Last edited:
Those aren't quite chunk gun rifles but could be used in that competition. Maybe bench rest? Hard choice, they all appear to be nice rifles.
I wasn't sure, so maybe yes, bench rest is a better description of them. I just know when he would come to our clubs shoots he talked about "over the log" shoots, so I made that assumption. It's a strong possibility I'm ignorant to what they were built/used as though!
 
I bought out a friend's estate after everyone else was done(they were after those tailpipe kind of things).
5 of the BP rifles included were these super hefty built target guns.
He ran the local nmlra stuff for several years and I belive they did a lot of chunk matches. The longest is a. 40(42") then (36")45,50,50,54... All have the large Siler lock and green mountain barrels except a Douglas on one of the 50s..
I can't keep them all, but I've got to pick one for me to keep and shoot to honor my friend. Hard choice to make, but what should be taken into consideration when picking a rifle like these?.. It's bigger bore better in a chunk match? More length? The 40 is long and 1"across, but the 50 with a green mountain barrel is 1⅛ across and really steady offhand if you can hold it! A whole new realm to me.
After I choose I'm going to need a little help in valuation on the rest as well.. Thanks in advance for the advice!
Joe View attachment 321816View attachment 321817View attachment 321818
Such is the fate of us all.
 
For use as a chunk gun or over the log rifle, one wants a long barrel that is stiff and a small diameter ball as chunk or over the log matches are shot at 60 yards. Visibility of the sights is also important. The hooded rear sights are beneficial as are the hooded front sights to shade the blade from sunlight. I like the 40 caliber rifle, but I would want the front sight hooded too. That might be my choice if you are casting the balls to ensure uniformity of ball diameter and weight. Not all of the over the log or chunk matches would allow the tang mounted peep sight. I would be looking at how precise the breech is fit to the tang. The 50 with the 11/8" barrel is also a likely candidate to be a good over the log rifle.

I assume these are all hooked breech guns.
 
Your friend seems to have had a favorite style rifle. Personally I have had good luck in over the log matches with a .40 caliber and the 1 inch barrel will give it a little weight. Those deep crescent butt plates could be a little rough over the log or off a bench. Flater butt plates seem to work better for me in those matches. I used to shoot a lot of cross stick and light bench.
 
The .40 is awesome !! That would make a good gun to win some things at our ML club shoots. Sorry your friend isn't still around to enjoy those. I'm sure he enjoyed shooting all of them.
Ohio Rusty ><>
 
Most purpose-built chunk guns will have the extra-long heavy barrel mounted in a full stock with a built-in cant block (flat section of the forestock) to locate the position to rest the barrel. I have seen some highly engineered rests for the chunk gun matches that allow any wooden rest. They are adjustable in height, may have a level and a sandbag or two to provide a dead rest for the barrel rest.
 
Last edited:
Well, I'm guessing these are just benchrest or target rifles then!
Thank you all for the insight.
Im going to keep the 40 and heavy 50 for my collection and then part ways with the other 3.
I know what I paid as a lot, but how should I go about pricing these fairly? I want them to be enjoyed by others.
Joe.
 
Well, I'm guessing these are just benchrest or target rifles then!
Thank you all for the insight.
Im going to keep the 40 and heavy 50 for my collection and then part ways with the other 3.
I know what I paid as a lot, but how should I go about pricing these fairly? I want them to be enjoyed by others.
Joe.
If it were me I would probably start by dividing my total investment by three and see where that puts the selling price per gun. Then you can see if there is room for a bit of profit or should you just pass them on to others at a great deal. Either way, cover your initial costs, and you've got two free cool guns. There are a few BP older target rifles on GunBroker right now. They are probably over priced on there but you could at least use that as a reference to get an idea where others are pricing them. Good luck with it.
 
Try shooting them all for best fit and accuracy. Keep the best two. Sell the rest. The crescent butt plates make them suitable for offhand if the rifles aren't too heavy. I prefer a flatter butt plate for bench or prone chunk gun shooting. Any of his club members familiar with their history and performance? What are the weights and overall length of the five guns?
 

Latest posts

Back
Top