Perloo?

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1950DAVE

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looking for recipes for perloo. Squirrel? Rabbit? Brother in law in Florida used to make it w/chicken. I'd like to try it with tree rats, or hop tails. Suggestions appreciated
Dave
 

atllaw

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I'd never heard of Perloo so I searched the term and got a ton of recipes right off. Most all of them were for a "Shrimp" Perloo. I'm gonna try it in a day or so. My wife likes shrimp and rice.

If I were in your position I think, as if anybody cares what I think, that I would read a bunch or recipes and list the basic ingredients and cooking techniques, then add/substitute other ingredients that compliment the type of meat you intend to use.

Naturally you would have to make other modifications to the recipe. i.e. You can't expect the hot rice to cook tree rat meat like it does the shrimp.

Myself, I'll stick with squirrel and dumplin's! :p
 

Loyalist Dave

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Short Answer a jambalaya recipe will work, but omit the okra.

PERLOO
most likely comes from the French Pilau as well as Pilaf. Pilau is from the Mediterranean Coast of France as paella is from the same coast but in Spain. Perloo is very similar to Jambalaya, probably because the origin of that dish is the nexus city of New Orleans, where the Spaniards and the French mixed cuisines, with the added addition of Africans who provided their cooking traditions. This influence extends East through Biloxi MS, to Mobile AL, and then to Pensacola FL. Apparently the name Jambalaya became prominent in the area around New Orleans, while the French influenced word Pilau was more common East of New Orleans, and shifted into the words Perloo, Purloo, and Perlo. Charleston SC, being a huge rice producer in the 18th century, was introduced to the dish, which they often call today Perlo, or the very English people in the city likely came up with the word Bog, as in "Chicken Bog" for the same dish.

Each version of the protein/veggie/rice cooked together tends to have some distinct ingredients..., it's fun as you can see why the ingredients for the protein are such due to the geography.

Paella you will need saffron rice, and usually Spanish sausage, fresh water muscles as well a s chicken and sausage, .....
Jambalaya you usually need okra and ham (but more commonly hot sausage), not to mention onions, bell peppers, and celery...,
Chicken Bog is with chicken and sausage, no seafood...,
Perloo tends to be with shrimp as the meat, no chicken, and might have bacon instead of sausage...

LD
 
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Loyalist Dave

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Well bergoo, gumbo, and Brunswick stew may all be served over rice, but that makes a different class of dish from paella, perloo, jambalaya, and Bog where the rice is flavored as it cooks with the rest of the ingredients.

LD
 

1950DAVE

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Thanks folks, I looked at some recipes on line. ATLLAW, I plan to cook and debone the squirrel first. Add it near the end of cooking. That's how brother in law did it w/chicken. I'm thinking andouille sausage, or some venison sausage, if g,son has some left. Don't want to overpower with sausage though.
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Loyalist Dave,why not just add the kind of rice you want to use during the cooking process, would not this flavor the rice. But this appears to be a mute issue at this point as 1950DAVE has a recipe. All these type meals seem to have the basic type of fixings just the preparation part is a bit different. Arriving with there origins of the lesser classes of folks whom made do with what they could harvest and gather. Strange how what would be called common folks meals have developed into classy dining.
 

Loyalist Dave

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Each version of the protein/veggie/rice cooked together tends to have some distinct ingredients..., it's fun as you can see why the ingredients for the protein are such due to the geography.
One of the essentials of the dish the OP began the topic with is the rice is cooked in and flavored by the dish. Bergoo, gumbo, Brunswick stew, normally don't have rice within them. Tossing in the rice changes the name of the dish...well.., according to Foodies....

As for dishes, well times change. Stuff that was considered lower class Great Depression food, is today chic. Stuff my grandparents wouldn't touch because "we can afford better now" is suddenly fashionable food. I have my grandmother's copper "fish mold" that she used 90 years ago to make "mackerel loaf" using a can of Jack Mackerel, bread crumbs, egg, and spices, for Friday supper. She never used it when I was a kid, because as I mentioned, she'd say, "we can afford better now". Funny thing was she wasn't Catholic, so didn't have to eat fish on Fridays back then...but the stores had specials on canned mackerel in those days (probably for the large Catholic population) and she preferred to let folks "think" the only reason she was buying it was religious tradition, not hardship. ;)



LD
 
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Kind of like my grandmother, Thursdays were meat loaf day what ever left overs that were in the ice box went into the meat loaf, beans, carrots, corn etc.. usually with a hand full of rice or macaroni. this with mashed potatoes and gravy made the meal.
 

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I guess I've been cooking perloo for years but didn't know it. :)
Based on the food "trinity" of the South, onion, bell pepper and celery, along with tomato paste, water, rice and Southern spices and some sort of meat like sliced smoked sausage or shrimp, it all gets cooked down into a firm concoction that makes a great, hearty meal.
 

Loyalist Dave

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I guess I've been cooking perloo for years but didn't know it. :)
Based on the food "trinity" of the South, onion, bell pepper and celery, along with tomato paste, water, rice and Southern spices and some sort of meat like sliced smoked sausage or shrimp, it all gets cooked down into a firm concoction that makes a great, hearty meal.
Indeed you have!

LD
 

tenngun

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Lobster and salmon were once considered poor food. In New England lobster was served in jails and poor houses.
Right now for a camp I own four copper kettles, two are the pail type and two are can shaped with lids, frying pan, two tin kettles, and one big tin cup.
I bet I carry more then was most ‘common’folk owned at home.
Throwing rice into your stew saved you from having to have a second pot to cook in.
 

zimmerstutzen

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There is a PA Dutch soup that varies ingredients almost every ten or 15 miles down the road for 60 miles in every direction although the two main ingredients are always the same. Sounds like some dishes evolved geographically as they spread.
 
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