Percussion cap Pistol

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Kevin Brewer

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Hi Everyone here is my other purchase, hopefully better luck here. It was marked as a 1865 gentleman's pistol. It has a rifled barrel about 0.55 Inch caliber. here are some pics, it has some maker marks on the barrel (can see in pic).

Thanks again for any help!






 

Kevin Brewer

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Ha, Thanks to Zonie I have discovered the obvious button and drag/drop option! here are those pictures again with out watermarks!



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Flintlock1640

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Crause in Herzberg. German maker in the early 1800s. This is a very finely engraved percussion conversion utilizing the engraving to cover-up screw holes. Very nice piece.
 

Kevin Brewer

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Thanks, for the intel - it was killing me trying to read that name, now it's Obvious! Guy who sold it had it as French, not looking at his stuff anymore.
 

Flintlock1640

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If the price is right, I encourage you to keep looking. Selling (for them) can be dangerous if they don't know what they have.
 

TFoley

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It's a VERY nice find, but missing the ramrod, and the other one of the pair. This/these were a pair of gentleman's travelling pistols that may also have doubles up as target pistols, judging by the fine sights and what appears to be a set trigger.

Here in UK we would shoot that in a target pistol competition, having had it checked over by a competent gunsmith, of course.

Timewise, I'd put it at the beginning of the percussion era, around the 1840's, as the style is certainly not that of the 1860s - it is far too ornate and far too much physical resemblance to its flintlock predecessor. Here in Europe, by the 1860's, the railways had taken over 99% of all horse-drawn stage-coach travel, by then a hopelessly outdated anachronism along with the need to protect oneself from brigands and 'men of the road'.
 
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