Percussion and flintlock barrel differences

Discussion in 'Flintlock Rifles' started by Joe Roof, Feb 11, 2019.

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  1. Feb 11, 2019 #1

    Joe Roof

    Joe Roof

    Joe Roof

    32 Cal

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    Just curious about the barrels. I recently bought an older traditions percussion rifle and have been interested in the theory of changing it to a flintlock. Don't know if I will. Both barrels from a traditions rifle are held in with a removable pin and the models I see on line look the same except 1 has a nipple and drum and 1 has a vent hole or flash hole. My question is internally are the barrels the same. Same barrel same breach plug. And the only difference is the drum and vent hole or are they a totally different design?
     
  2. Feb 11, 2019 #2

    Grenadier1758

    Grenadier1758

    Grenadier1758

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    You need to determine if the drum installation is installed through the breech plug and deep drilled to the flash channel. If a ram rod with a cleaning jag stops just above the drum, you have the CVA/Traditions through breech. This is not an easy conversion to flint. My first thought is that the change over would be too difficult. Hopefully Zonie will post his diagrams of the CVA breeches.
     
  3. Feb 11, 2019 #3

    Zonie

    Zonie

    Zonie

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    To the best of my knowledge, all of the newer made Tradition's use the plug installed thru the side of the breech threads method on their barrels.
    This is shown in the upper right hand area of this drawing I made.
    NOCKS-BREECH.jpg
    The only difference between the flintlock vent that is shown and the percussion drum type is the drum extends further out from the side of the barrel and it has a nipple installed in it.

    To modify the percussion drum to work as a flintlock, all of the exposed surfaces of the drum would need to be removed. Do NOT remove the plug. Instead, saw off the majority of the exposed drum and file the rest down to be flush with the side of the barrel.

    After this is done, the hole that remains in the plug must be drilled using the right size tap drill and the drilled hole will need to be threaded.

    This is a one way journey and once it is done the percussion configuration cannot be reinstalled without major surgery.

    The lock can be replaced with a Traditions, CVA or L & R replacement lock.

    That L & R lock will cost about the same as the gun is worth after it is converted so if someone is going to do this, they are doing if for themselves. They will never be able to recoup the money they have invested in the gun.
     
  4. Feb 11, 2019 #4

    zimmerstutzen

    zimmerstutzen

    zimmerstutzen

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    Less hassle to buy another barrel and lock. or just get another similar gun of the other persuasion.,
     
  5. Feb 12, 2019 #5

    Joe Roof

    Joe Roof

    Joe Roof

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    Thank you for the info. If I do attempt this it will be for my enjoyment and use. I have another cap lock and would enjoy making a rifle a 1 of a kind with my own changes and style.
     
  6. Feb 12, 2019 #6

    Zonie

    Zonie

    Zonie

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    Look into getting a lock first before you mess up your gun by removing the drum.
    If the prices or availability of the lock is a problem you don't want to end up with a basically worthless rifle.
     

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