Peep sight

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deermanok

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I got this peep sight from track of the wolf with the intent of replacing the rear sight on one of my rifles.
Not sure if it would be good for hunting or more of a target shooting sight.
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BS

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Id lean to target shooting. Hunting situations go into twilight periods and the aperature may be too small for that sort of lighting.
That is why you screw out the aperture and use the peep as a ghost ring. That big hole lets light in.
 

Prairieofthedog

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Yup what they said,used one similar on my squirrel gun. In the woods could absolutely not see thru it.
 
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I got this peep sight from track of the wolf with the intent of replacing the rear sight on one of my rifles.
Not sure if it would be good for hunting or more of a target shooting sight.
View attachment 86377
Is there enough meat around the aperture to drill and tap for some sort of insert? then you could use it for both hunting and targets (in all lighting). If not, a better option might be a blank like pictured below, and then drill and tap that. if you don't like the inserts for the william's sights and such, you could make them from small, short bolts, just center punch them and drill them out to the right diameter for you (easier in a drill press, but the short length is helpful, as you won't notice if it was lightly off level and plumb when you drilled as much). A rubber o-ring will keep the aperture tight, without having to over-tighten it. Remember, aperture sights are best when they're mounted close to the eye, rather than further out like a notch.
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deermanok

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Is there enough meat around the aperture to drill and tap for some sort of insert? then you could use it for both hunting and targets (in all lighting). If not, a better option might be a blank like pictured below, and then drill and tap that. if you don't like the inserts for the william's sights and such, you could make them from small, short bolts, just center punch them and drill them out to the right diameter for you (easier in a drill press, but the short length is helpful, as you won't notice if it was lightly off level and plumb when you drilled as much). A rubber o-ring will keep the aperture tight, without having to over-tighten it. Remember, aperture sights are best when they're mounted close to the eye, rather than further out like a notch.View attachment 86874
Appreciate the idea.
I also been looking at the Williams fiber optic sights.
I have those on one of my other rifles and set it up with a ghost ring rear sight. Works good for me.
 

Spikebuck

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That is why you screw out the aperture and use the peep as a ghost ring. That big hole lets light in.
One of the disadvantages of too large a hole is it diminishes accuracy if the aperture holes size encroaches on or is larger than the eye pupil (which, of course, changes with the amount of light).

BTW...I have one of the sights the OP shows. It's spent it's life in my muzzleloading tackle box....too small and way too far up the barrel for me.

From an article on the topic:

Aperture sights are accurate even if the front sight is not centered in the rear aperture due to a phenomenon called parallax suppression. This is because, when the aperture is smaller than the eye's pupil diameter, the aperture itself becomes the entrance pupil for the entire optical system of target, front sight post, rear aperture, and eye. As long as the aperture's diameter is completely contained within the eye's pupil diameter, the exact visual location of the front sight post within the rear aperture ring does not affect the accuracy, and accuracy only starts to degrade slightly due to parallax shift as the aperture's diameter begins to encroach on the outside of the eye's pupil diameter. An additional benefit to aperture sights is that smaller apertures provide greater depth of field, making the target less blurry when focusing on the front sight.

In low light conditions the parallax suppression phenomenon is markedly better. The depth of field looking through the sight remains the same as in bright conditions. This is in contrast to open sights, where the eye's pupil will become wider in low light conditions, meaning a larger aperture and a blurrier target.
 

BS

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Yes, but you still have the rear sight, it just may be a little fuzzier but the ghost ring still helps with focus.

You have to do whatever works for you!
 

Vaino

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Had a peep sight on my Garand which was the only peep sight that worked.....and was used for horizontal shooting.

Went hunting w/ a Redfield peep sight and used it on squirrels......missed a whole lot of squirrels when they were in the trees. My buddy and I used a peep sight on our deer rifles and seeing the country we hunted had many deep ravines, uphill and downhill shots resulted in many misses. Solved the problems by installing and using plain iron sights.

Target shooting is where the peep sight is superior to plain iron sights..... only because of shooting horizontally. .....Fred
 

deermanok

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I don't think it's worth the effort for me to install that sight.
I did take a small 1/8" round file and opened up the rear sight notch. I have a much better sight picture now.
Probably just leave well enough alone.
 
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