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Pedersoli Kentucky Longrifle

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kje54

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I finally decided to order the Kentucky kit that way I can do minor modifications if I choose to plus finish the furniture the way I want it. Most of the work is furniture anyway as everything is pre-fitted. Besides, I always wanted a "Kentucky Longrifle Flintlock since I was a kid.
 

LawrenceA

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I finally decided to order the Kentucky kit that way I can do minor modifications if I choose to plus finish the furniture the way I want it. Most of the work is furniture anyway as everything is pre-fitted. Besides, I always wanted a "Kentucky Longrifle Flintlock since I was a kid.
I am with you on that one. Got one just 2 months ago. Oh Happy days!!
 

Mongo

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kje54,
I ordered the Pedersoli Pennsylvania rifle on 28 Aug 2020, DGW shipped it within four business days, however USPS held it up, finally received it on 15 Sep 2020.
The kit has a lot less wood on it than the kit I built back in 1997 (not complaining).
I plan on putting on a TOTW 7/8" rear traditional sight (for example, RS-G-354-14).
 

Stophel

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There basically is nothing "historically accurate" about any of these mass produced guns. Like it or not. If you want one, that's fine. If you have fun with one, that's fine. But they really do not look or feel ANYTHING LIKE an actual 18th or early 19th century gun. Some of the military musket repros can be made to be OK, more or less, but any of the "Kentucky rifles" just don't come anywhere close.
 

JCKelly

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Fortunately for these gun makers, a large number of current ML shooters have no interest at all in history.

I think that somewhat dangerous, as current literature, IMHO, does not take these things seriously, as did mid-19th century publications. A minor example -again only in my personal view - is short starters. I'd say they are a mid-20th century invention. Lord help your barrel if you forget & ONLY use the starter in loading. My first percussion rifle experience was with a family rifle by John Shuler, Liverpool, Penna. Loaded just fine. Rifling was deeper at muzzle, seems impractical to do with a modern production made barrel.

Me, the newest book I'd suggest is Dillin's 1924 The Kentucky Rifle. Big game hunters (my view) ought consider The Sporting Rifle and Its Projectiles, Lieut James Forsyth, M.A. 1863. Anyone might find Greener's Gunnery, 1858, interesting. Reprints of both are available, look on abebooks dot com. Read something 19th century, guys!

Well, obviously I am a very old, perhaps demented, fellow.
 

Stophel

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Fortunately for these gun makers, a large number of current ML shooters have no interest at all in history.
But, the question was " How historically accurate are these rifles?". The answer is, not at all.
 

Loyalist Dave

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Is the Pendersoli Kentucky longrifle passable to a fair degree or is it really not? ..., Was even considering the Pendersoli Pennsylvania Rifle although I'm not so sure about the rear sight.
Well for ME, if I was your personal adviser, I'd say at least a 38" barrel would be needed for a "passable" repro flintlock rifle.

So you must decide where you "fall" into a category of buyer, and there are, from what I've observed,

Five Schools of Thought on Repro Flintlock Rifles...,

ONE
It's a flintlock, so that's fine for me. It works, it hits where I shoot it, and I don't care what others think.

TWO
It would be better for you to get something that "works" for you now, instead of putting off jumping into the hobby until you can "afford" a custom or semi-custom rifle. Life is short, and only you can judge if the cash for the fully correct rifle is in your foreseeable future.

THREE
Get the less costly, sorta right factory flintlock rifle now, and make a few cosmetic changes. That gives you a rifle that is OK to schlep around in the woods, and you won't fret about scratches and dents as you might with a really well made, solo-built, custom rifle.

FOUR
Buy once; cry once. Save up your greenbacks, and get a proper rifle the first time. After all if you buy the factory rifle now, and then save, you will have spent even more money. Sure you will have two rifles, but the money spent on the first rifle only delays you in getting that really nice rifle. (See version TWO)

FIVE
I can't imagine why anybody would ever buy a factory rifle. Mine was hand made, because only the most authentic rifle that I can purchase will do.


LD
 

JCKelly

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Yes, Stophel the question was indeed " How historically accurate are these rifles?".
"historically" means to me something about HISTORY
And, IMHO, there is little interest, in History, among many who shoot guns which require the bullet be pushed down the muzzle to load.
 

kje54

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Well for ME, if I was your personal adviser, I'd say at least a 38" barrel would be needed for a "passable" repro flintlock rifle.

So you must decide where you "fall" into a category of buyer, and there are, from what I've observed,

Five Schools of Thought on Repro Flintlock Rifles...,

ONE
It's a flintlock, so that's fine for me. It works, it hits where I shoot it, and I don't care what others think.

TWO
It would be better for you to get something that "works" for you now, instead of putting off jumping into the hobby until you can "afford" a custom or semi-custom rifle. Life is short, and only you can judge if the cash for the fully correct rifle is in your foreseeable future.

THREE
Get the less costly, sorta right factory flintlock rifle now, and make a few cosmetic changes. That gives you a rifle that is OK to schlep around in the woods, and you won't fret about scratches and dents as you might with a really well made, solo-built, custom rifle.

FOUR
Buy once; cry once. Save up your greenbacks, and get a proper rifle the first time. After all if you buy the factory rifle now, and then save, you will have spent even more money. Sure you will have two rifles, but the money spent on the first rifle only delays you in getting that really nice rifle. (See version TWO)

FIVE
I can't imagine why anybody would ever buy a factory rifle. Mine was hand made, because only the most authentic rifle that I can purchase will do.


LD
I decided to get the kit for one reason and one reason only, because I always wanted one. As for taking it to an event? Probably not, so no need to fear me tarnishing a good event other than by my presence of course........... (That was a joke).
As for a "proper, historically accurate" longrifle that's already in the works. Now if I could just make a historically accurate me....... Sans the body lice and fleas........
 

Dale Lilly

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My deceased wife shot along with a bunch of ladies with 'custom' rifles. She shot a CVA frontier that I made from a kit. Winner??? Gloria [Li'l Sparrow] My wife. BTW it also killed a few game animals. I love Hawkens but the idea that they made only one 'style' is nonsense. Polecat
 

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kje54

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Here's the authentic Virginia Longrifle I just bought. A K. Smith with a Jim Chambers round faced lock, all hand forged iron furniture.

 

kje54

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IMO, it is kinda, vaguely, sorta like a Reading longrifle due to the shape of the comb.
It has all of the basics that longrifles have like patchbox, curved trigger guard, pinned barrel and non-adjustable sights but it lacks the grace typically found on a original long rifles.

I've seen others flat out state these reproductions are no where close to a real longrifle but I often get the feeling when I read that, that they are bragging more about their own guns than giving these Italian reproductions a fair shake.
I just received it (the Kentucky) today and I'm comparing it with original Readings. It will take some extra work but I'm positive I can get it closer than "kinda, sorta, maybe".
:thumb:
 
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JCKelly

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Original Southern rifle, unmarked, probably Virginia. Styling similar to upper James area, either Botetourt or Rockbridge County. A relatively shallow trigger guard and stock with little drop are Virginia characteristics. I personally, do not know. Was told all of this by I forget who, lousy notes. Converted from flint. Bought it strictly because I liked the lines.

Virginia right 001.jpg
DSCN0416 ed.jpg
Virginia Rear Sight 018.jpg

43-3/8" .42 cal heavily swamped bbl, muzzle 0.938", narrows to 0.832" about 8" back, then widens slightly at breech to 0.862" This is not atypical of southern rifles. Weighs 8 lb, has 13-1/8" length of pull.
 
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Mongo

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How many repros or kits are "historically accurate"? None, if the stocks are made using a five axis pantograph machine, computer controlled machined and bored barrels, cast lockplates and components (versus hand forged), pre-inlet stocks, etc.
 
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Mark Herman

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Why buy a repop? Some folks are not that interested in HC, many folks can't afford a custom replication or an original. Why shouldn't that person be allowed to enjoy the sport and comradship without being derided for buying and enjoying the best they can afford. Perhaps it will spur them on to getting better equipment later, maybe not. We're not all Hershel House or Jud Brenen.
 

Loyalist Dave

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How many repros or kits are "historically accurate"? None, if the stocks are made using a five axis pantograph machine, computer controlled machined and bored barrels, cast lockplates and components (versus hand forged), pre-inlet stocks, etc.
Ah but there are distinctions.....,

Historically Inspired.., is a piece, whether it is a rifle/gun, or furniture, clothing, or a tool, that is made from similar materials to those available in the 18th century, and follows what the technology could have produced. This is the broadest group as opinions widely differ on the meaning of "similar materials" above. The Pedersoli PA Longrifle and the Pedersoli Frontier fall into this group as does the Leman GPR, and the TC Hawken.

Historically Accurate..., is a piece, whether it is a rifle/gun, or furniture, clothing or a tool, that is made from materials available in the 18th century, and made to resemble an actual extant item from the time period. Most of the solo built rifles fall more, or less, into this category, even with a modern steel barrel.

Documentary Piece..., is a piece, whether it is a rifle/gun, or furniture, or a tool, that is made from materials available in the 18th century, this is made as close as possible a copy to an extant piece, to often include using the same tools and techniques used in the original time period. A rifle made with a hand forged, hand rifled barrel would fall into this category. ;)

LD
 
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I bought mine with idea it would get me in the game sooner and I will either trade up or add a correct, period rifle. I have parts for a fowler, that have been being kicked around for years, but not being around BP or having shot BP, it's hard to make the call on what is correct or what I want to build.

With that said, now that I am shooting, having to tweak things and making my own accoutrements, the light bulbs are coming on. I am seeing what I like, don't like, things I would want different in a future rifle.

Plus, now that I have a rifle, I have joined a "local" BP club that is aging out and getting short on members.
 

Mongo

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I can forgo a $2000 to $3000 gun for the sake of a rendezvous, reenactment, or primitive trek. Back when I started in living history in the '90's, we used what was available from Dixie Gun Works (1766 Charleville pattern muskets versus the historically accurate Springfield Armory Model 1795), or any variety of long rifes and the 1814-1819 era Zoli "Model 1803" repro (to be honest, it was a near spittin' image of an original I placed next to at Pompey's Pillar- it once belonged to Norm Flayderman). Not many in the public knew the difference anyway. Very few had The Rifle Shoppe Model 1803 Type I rifle. As far as clothing went, some made the effort towards historical accuracy, most didn't and couldn't be bothered to learn period correct skills or terms. But, each group and organization has different standards. Me, I personally like hand making and sewing my own clothing and accoutrements, eating period foods on a trek, and "roughing" it on a period camping trip or float down the river. I'm not going to have all my fillings removed to be "historically accurate", bleed myself when I fall ill, have teeth pulled without anesthesia, nor engage in any battles with hostile natives (bears and meth heads in the wilderness, that's another issue).
 
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