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Pedersoli Kentucky Longrifle

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kje54

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Actually I was thinking the flintlock version. I know "Kentucky Long rifle" is or was a relatively modern generic name for long guns. I guess my question is how accurate is the so called Kentucky Long rifle to any rifle of that period? Or is the Pendersoli Kentucky pretty much a made up modern long rifle?
 

Zonie

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IMO, it is kinda, vaguely, sorta like a Reading longrifle due to the shape of the comb.
It has all of the basics that longrifles have like patchbox, curved trigger guard, pinned barrel and non-adjustable sights but it lacks the grace typically found on a original long rifles.

I've seen others flat out state these reproductions are no where close to a real longrifle but I often get the feeling when I read that, that they are bragging more about their own guns than giving these Italian reproductions a fair shake.
 

kje54

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IMO, it is kinda, vaguely, sorta like a Reading longrifle due to the shape of the comb.
It has all of the basics that longrifles have like patchbox, curved trigger guard, pinned barrel and non-adjustable sights but it lacks the grace typically found on a original long rifles.

I've seen others flat out state these reproductions are no where close to a real longrifle but I often get the feeling when I read that, that they are bragging more about their own guns than giving these Italian reproductions a fair shake.
Kinda what I was thinking especially about the Kentucky Longrifle "controversy". The primary reason I ask is as a kid the Kentucky was the first flintlock I ever saw and fell in love with it, it wasn't until much later I learned there were so many different longrifles that were made in so many different styles. I won't be attending any super authentic, judged events but I still want flinters that are reasonably close to some original.
 

kje54

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I'd like some more honest opinions. Is the Pendersoli Kentucky longrifle passable to a fair degree or is it really not? If not I won't even consider it and will continue to look for other longrifles that aren't high priced but more historically correct. Oh and I'm already working on one kit Tulle and have a flinter pistol kit waiting to be done so I'm really not interested in another kit.
Was even considering the Pendersoli Pennsylvania Rifle although I'm not so sure about the rear sight.

 

kje54

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Found some of the old discussions concerning this and basically all production flinters, pretty much says they are primarily a conglomerate of different styles thrown together to make an "appealing" rifle for the unwashed masses.........
Looks like I might have to really start saving my pennies and get something more historically correct.
 

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It's unfortunate this rifle and kit have been degraded over the years. Dixie Gun Works used to offer a Pedersoli Pennsylvania flint or percussion rifle or kit starting at $395 (1997), kit number FR-1065. The rifle came with a daisy style patchbox which opened with a button on the top of the buttplate, and 3/8" rear sight. However, they were limited to .45 caliber (mine was a flintlock kit, shot perfectly).
Recently ordered a .50 percussion Pennsylvania rifle kit on 28 Aug 2020 from DGW. No patch box, not even sure it has a sideplate. Shipped from DGW 9 September, finally shipped from Memphis USPS today 12 September (will be lucky to get it by Friday).
I ordered some parts from Track of the Wolf to individualize my rifle; nickel star inlay for the cheek piece, and oval thumbpiece inlay. Also plan to replace the adjustable rear sight with a primitive sight.

Get 'em while you can!
 
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kje54

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It's unfortunate this rifle and kit have been degraded over the years. Dixie Gun Works used to offer a Pedersoli Pennsylvania flint or percussion rifle or kit starting at $395 (1997), kit number FR-1065. The rifle came with a daisy style patchbox which opened with a button on the top of the buttplate, and 3/8" rear sight. However, they were limited to .45 caliber (mine was a flintlock kit, shot perfectly).
Recently ordered a .50 percussion Pennsylvania rifle kit on 28 Aug 2020 from DGW. No patch box, not even sure it has a sideplate. Shipped from DGW 9 September, finally shipped from Memphis USPS today 12 September (will be lucky to get it by Friday). Get 'em while you can!
On average inflation doubles prices every ten years so the current price is consistent with that estimation. I don't have a problem with the Pendersoli rifles themselves it's just I want something that is more authentic. Despite my claim that I don't want another kit gun I've been looking at the Kibler Colonial Rifle kit, for the price I get what I want at basically the same price of a finished Pendersoli Pennsylvania. Of course there's always the Pendersoli Indian Trade gun but I'm already building a French Fusil de Chasse and am buying another .54 caliber rifle that was listed here a while back.
 

troy2000

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Actually I was thinking the flintlock version. I know "Kentucky Long rifle" is or was a relatively modern generic name for long guns. I guess my question is how accurate is the so called Kentucky Long rifle to any rifle of that period? Or is the Pendersoli Kentucky pretty much a made up modern long rifle?
Believe it or not, 'Kentucky long rifle' isn't a modern term. The name got pinned on them way back when.
Exactly when these uniquely American long rifles came to be called Kentucky rifles is not entirely certain. Daniel Boone’s adventures in the rich lands of Kentucky west of the Appalachian Mountains, and the subsequent stream of settlers through the Cumberland Gap into this new frontier, may have been a part of it. The name Kentucky rifle first appears in an 1822 poem called “The Hunters of Kentucky,” written by Samuel Woodworth, about General Andrew Jackson’s defeat of the British at the Battle of New Orleans in 1815. In the fifth verse, he wrote:

But Jackson was wide awake,
and wasn’t scar’d of trifles,
For well he knew what aim we take
with our Kentucky rifles;
 

kje54

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Believe it or not, 'Kentucky long rifle' isn't a modern term. The name got pinned on them way back when.
Yeah, I know. It was late and I wasn't thinking that well, didn't put my thought down properly. Was thinking back when I was a kid, every flintlock was a "Kentucky longrifle" which is what I meant by "relatively modern generic name". Sorry for the confusion.
 

Mongo

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The accessories on those Pedersoli's have been degraded, I'm not referring to the price, which is consistent with inflation. There are several Pennsylvania schools which the rifle resembles, a little knowledge goes a long way.
 

kje54

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The accessories on those Pedersoli's have been degraded, I'm not referring to the price, which is consistent with inflation. There are several Pennsylvania schools which the rifle resembles, a little knowledge goes a long way.
Why do you think I'm asking..........? Of course I'm getting different results in my research, different opinions, different claims. So who do I believe?
 

brazosland

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I have the Kentucky that I bought almost 30 years ago. It was flint and I converted it to percussion (never liked the flintlock, it never was reliable.)

Stylistically the gun seems to fit in the 1815-1830 time period. It’s a loose representation of several different schools. Not a good representation of any of them, and it’s stocked in walnut. I like historical accuracy, so all of that has always bothered me.

All that said, the rifle handles beautifully and is ridiculously accurate. As a shooter it’s just outstanding. Points naturally and nice long sight radius.

Mine is a .50, so as light as it is to handle, it’s also powerful enough to hunt just about anything. More win.

I couldn’t stand the look of the gun so last spring after almost 30 years I stripped the finish off the stock, stained it darker with an oil finish and worked on trying to correct a few of its issues.

I took the barrel back to white, mounted a percussion lock, and filed the nose piece into a more correct style. Still need to make a new ramrod. I think it looks a lot better. I want to replace the patch box with something that doesn’t scream spaghetti gun.

I have much more expensive and historically correct guns, but this piece has a place for me as a rainy day gun, a loaner, and a back up gun traveling to hunt. If you need a rifle to fill those roles...it’s a damn good choice.

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Doc Ivory

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Boy, that's a nice lookin' piece.
Nothin; like taking a little time and a bit of patience for something to pay off.
 

JCKelly

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I shot various muzzle loading guns, ranging from Grampa's in 1954 to ones I built through the '80's. Quit (long story).

Started up again about 2009 with a Pedersoli long rifle. It was not worth a bucket of warm spit, as far as accuracy went.

If you want an accurate rifle with a good, tough barrel get Traditions. MidwayUSA sells them.
If you want authenticity, get a Traditions kit & maybe some good brass hardware from Track of the Wolf and finish it yourself. I am about to do that now with a pistol.

Traditions barrels are accurate and best withstand human error in loading. Again, long story.
I am an experienced metallurgist and over the last several decades have become very picky about what I shoot.
 

mushka

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Historically correct don't mean spit to me. I couldn't tell an HC rifle from a modern one side by side. They all look alike to me. Kinda like looking at a stinger of bass after fishing. They are long, some got half stocks, some full stocks, some drop down at the butt more than others. All unimportant. I just like sidelock muzzle loaders and if it shoots well my major requirement is satisfied. If others don't like the way my guns look they don't get to shoot them. I think a lot, or even a majority of modern MZ shooters could care less about HC as long as their gun shoots the way they want it to.
Just my two cents.
 

mooman76

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I've seen others flat out state these reproductions are no where close to a real longrifle but I often get the feeling when I read that, that they are bragging more about their own guns than giving these Italian reproductions a fair shake.
I'm with Zonie on this one. I see it all the time where people say a certain rifle isn't historically correct and not even close. I can see little to no difference and guns way back didn't come off assembly line so no two were exactly alike. People often would make their own little changes to make it unique the way they wanted it, just as today. Gun makers often bought parts and added on whatever they could get to make it work like different patch boxes and such.
 

Cowboy

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A lot of gun builders built and adopted a certain architectural look that was desirable and popular at the time and place where they lived. Thus resulting in a certain type (school) of muzzleloader.

I’m betting that these renowned builders set these trends that gained popularity.

I’m also betting that these accomplished builders represented a very small percentage of the number of guns being produced?

I’ll be the last to state that a current build is or isn’t historically correct? Small obscure villages, homestead’s, or on the frontier, muzzleloader’s were built with whatever parts were available?

Lastly, I personally own many books with old illustration’s and pictures of many types within the same time frame and geographic location.

Have a Pedersoli Kentucky flint in .50 cal. Love the rifle. Sparks great and like any of them, accurate with the right shooter behind the trigger.

My negative would be all that dang printing inscribed on the barrel. Of course all those production guns share this affliction. Personally defarbed and refinished more than one barrel due to that.

Respectfully, Cowboy
 

JCKelly

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My Pedersoli might have been accurate if loaded in whatever interesting manner suited that barrel.
It seemed to me to have some variable size along the presumably .45 cal bore, and whatever else I do not know.
I just loaded it as I had other rifles, one original and other modern made (by me) rifles with barrels from a couple different sources. These rifles all shot OK. The Ped I valued as already described. One other Pedersoli rifle, a .50 cal, in my Mich club appeared to satisfy its owner.
I would maintain that Traditions is a very good source for muzzle loaders to actually shoot. Me, I have studied old weapons so I fix the style to suit. Just my preference.
 

kje54

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It's unfortunate this rifle and kit have been degraded over the years. Dixie Gun Works used to offer a Pedersoli Pennsylvania flint or percussion rifle or kit starting at $395 (1997), kit number FR-1065. The rifle came with a daisy style patchbox which opened with a button on the top of the buttplate, and 3/8" rear sight. However, they were limited to .45 caliber (mine was a flintlock kit, shot perfectly).
Recently ordered a .50 percussion Pennsylvania rifle kit on 28 Aug 2020 from DGW. No patch box, not even sure it has a sideplate. Shipped from DGW 9 September, finally shipped from Memphis USPS today 12 September (will be lucky to get it by Friday).
I ordered some parts from Track of the Wolf to individualize my rifle; nickel star inlay for the cheek piece, and oval thumbpiece inlay. Also plan to replace the adjustable rear sight with a primitive sight.

Get 'em while you can!
I have a question on the primitive rear sight you plan on using. Is that a ToTW purchase or something else?
 

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