Patterns and reference books on clothing

Discussion in 'Clothing' started by Sicilian Hunter, Feb 10, 2019.

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  1. Feb 10, 2019 #1

    Sicilian Hunter

    Sicilian Hunter

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    Folks,
    This may be a better suggestion as an add-on to the "How-to" forum but I think it would be helpful to those looking to make their own clothing with less experience to have a pool of patterns and books in a PDF format to draw upon.
    Many books that have been suggested to me have been exorbitantly priced when I find them (if I can find them in print) on line.
    I found "The Cut of Men's Clothing" which was recommended to me on Amazon for a mere $123 (https://www.amazon.com/dp/0878300252/?tag=skimlinks_replacement-20) !!!

    I then found this and wanted to share it: http://www.reenactor.ru/ARH/PDF/The_Cut.pdf

    The Sicilian
     
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  2. Feb 10, 2019 #2

    jackley

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    Wm. Booth Draper, Quarter Master General, Track of the Wolf, Jas. Townsend, Dixie Gun Works,The Books of Buckskinning. Northwest Traders.

    These are a few off the top of my head that have fabric and patterns.

    Jerry
     
  3. Feb 10, 2019 #3

    Sicilian Hunter

    Sicilian Hunter

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    Jerry,
    I was thinking more along the lines of free PDFs that folks might want to share along with tips and/or warnings when it came to the instructions.
    I found when looking up patterns on Amazon that the reviews on some might read, "...the instructions were hard to understand for an experienced person and would be just about impossible to understand if you were new to sewing..."
     
  4. Feb 10, 2019 #4

    Stophel

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    To be brutally honest, that's just the way it goes. If you want to research and learn, it ain't cheap. Many of us have spent large amounts of money and huge amounts of time (years and years and years) to learn what we wanted to know. I wish it was cheap and easy too... but it ain't.
    And no, sewing instructions are often NOT easy for those new to sewing...that's just kinda the way it is with everything, isn't it? 18th century clothing is often complex, and the hand stitching can be hard to comprehend at first. I like to have never figured out how to do the stroke gathers for where the shirt sleeve meets the wrist bands. It was NOT easy to understand, even with proper instructions. I FINALLY got it, though, and now I can make really nice looking stroke gathers. ;)

    And since the golden age of reenacting was back in the 80's-90's, and has dwindled considerably since then, there just ain't a whole lot of new stuff being published, and the old books are often out of print, and hard to come by.

    Depending upon exactly what it is you're looking for, here's a few books you may be able to still find that may be helpful:
    Fitting & Proper, by Sharon Ann Burnston
    Tidings From the 18th Century by Beth Gilgun
    Rural Pennsylvania Clothing by Ellen Gehret

    I'm not sure if any of these are still in print, actually.

    If you want to get more in depth, there are other titles which will no doubt be harder to come by.

    All that said, in this day and age, you can discover SO MUCH here on the internet... IF you are willing to look for it. Most aren't, of course. But digging, and searching, and scrounging can yield some pretty good results. It takes lots of time, lots of work, and some pretty creative search terms, and often one discovery will lead to another and another.

    Patterns themselves are actually not hard to come by at all, with J.P. Ryan patterns being among the best.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  5. Feb 10, 2019 #5

    Stophel

    Stophel

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    Oh, and Amazon shows The Cut of Men's Clothes used for $39.40.

    Many years ago, I saw that book and passed it up, as it didn't seem like it would be all that helpful to me.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  6. Feb 11, 2019 #6

    Cruzatte

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    I've been using patterns from https://reconstructinghistory.com/product-category/historic-patterns/18th-century-patterns/ I've found the instructions for the pattern for an early 18th century waistcoat pretty easy to understand. Also for the purist, they give proper 18th century hand sewing options, as well as modern sewing machine instructions. If you're a moderate purist, you can mix and match, sewing the hidden interior seams by machine, and the obvious exterior seams by hand. And some of the patterns are available as PDF downloads.
     
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  7. Feb 12, 2019 #7

    Sicilian Hunter

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    Stophel,
    I agree that to get it "right" takes effort, time and money.
    However, I would help someone out who maybe a little light on cash and or experience get a leg up in this lifestyle as it is waning as you mentioned.
    I did see the book on a mm Amazon later for the cheaper price but I know I can spend $43 better then on a book I can down load and print myself for the price of the paper and ink (see my first post for that link).
    I have Beth Gilgun's "Tidings from the 18th Century" and although its OK I don't think it will help a beginner tremendously.
    Out of print books and dead links litter this lifestyle and its a shame because it discourages new people.
    The patterns that Broken Nock mentions are good as he explained.
    I have one for a weskit that's pretty good
     
  8. Feb 12, 2019 #8

    Sicilian Hunter

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    N
    Nock,
    Are the downloads free?
     
  9. Feb 12, 2019 #9

    Cruzatte

    Cruzatte

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    I doubt it. I just checked, and it didn't look like it.
     
  10. Feb 12, 2019 #10

    Sicilian Hunter

    Sicilian Hunter

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    Thanks for checking into that
     
  11. Feb 12, 2019 #11

    Coot

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  12. Feb 12, 2019 #12

    Coot

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    Thousands of out of print books are readily available. Check bookfinder.com
     
  13. Feb 12, 2019 #13

    Sicilian Hunter

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    Thanks Coot!
     
  14. Feb 15, 2019 #14

    MOwoodsman

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    There are a number of tailoring books on archive.org. I found a hand full from 1860-1880. I'm sure there are some from far earlier.
     
  15. Feb 16, 2019 #15

    Sicilian Hunter

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    Woodsman,
    Thanks for the link/info
     

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