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tenngun

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Just watched the Patriot last night.
We know that the Patriot was not the tops on historic accuracy 😊
Howsomever We see some patriots hung in a tree. All have Jefferson style booties on. Something that came popular in the nineteenth century.
Most of the people in this movie have boots on.
I’ve seen plenty of paintings showing shoes. Mostly buckled some tied. Or boots, real popular in the army for officers. Lastly high-lows.
Does any one know of an historic reference to what became the Jefferson bootie in eighteenth century?
I would love it as it’s a lot more comfortable then high-lows. And nicer to wear in the woods.
When I trek in eighteenth century dress I cheat and wear my booties... is it historic at all, I’ve yet to find a painting of one.
 

Spence10

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Show me some Jefferson booties, I'm not familiar with them and the internet doesn't seem to be, either.

Spence
 

kje54

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Supposedly laced shoes had been around for a while primarily among the lower classes as buckles were expensive and by the time of the Rev War associated with the aristocracy and to a degree shunned by many American patriots. Jefferson wore a pair of "workman's" bootees to his 1801 inauguration to identify with the common man and the bootees became known as Jefferson Bootees.
 

tenngun

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In France after the revolution buckles were a style trend, people just lost their heads over them.
One was expected to foreswear aristocratic things. Waist coats got short, hair got cut and buckles on shoes were out. Jefferson was a Frenhophile and went with booties, tied not buckled.
The cut of the bootie giving some ankle support and more importantly keeping crap out of your shoes is the thing I’ve not seen in eighteenth century cartoons or paintings. However many poor are often in trousers or have a gaiter over their shoes so they can’t be seen easily. Gents would never get painting done in ‘working shoes’
 

tenngun

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Those are a high top, Ive learned to call them high lows or tracking boots. I was hoping some one would know of the shorter brogan style earlier then nineteenth century
I’m thinking Prescott is painted in those at Bunker(Breeds) hill
Or this good looking Gent .... but that’s me treking.... no jury on a trek
6F8964A9-E370-4974-91AA-6817D91B095F.jpeg
CB8DB4C8-AE7A-4E2D-97C2-9DDD7504FDEB.jpeg
 

kje54

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Those are a high top, Ive learned to call them high lows or tracking boots. I was hoping some one would know of the shorter brogan style earlier then nineteenth century
I’m thinking Prescott is painted in those at Bunker(Breeds) hill
Or this good looking Gent .... but that’s me treking.... no jury on a trekView attachment 47194View attachment 47196
From my readings Brogans were originally derived from the 16th century Scottish/Irish farmer boots. The first known issuance of Brogans was to the English army during the English Civil War, (1642 - 1651).



Later 18th & 19th century Brogans:



A brief history of Brogans (English Civil War to World War I)
 

Spence10

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There are some terms in the old literature which always make me wonder what kind of footwear they are describing. Anyone have an idea?


1750 ….mens double channel'd and shoe boots
1762 Men women, boys and girls shoes of all sorts, Shoe-boots,
1767 Pair of half worn English shoe Boots
1775 militia White Stockings, half Boots, black knee Garters.
1783 One pair of Shoeboots [estate inventory]

and...

1772 half worn leather breeches, crown boots, and yarn stockings

Spence
 

tenngun

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There are some terms in the old literature which always make me wonder what kind of footwear they are describing. Anyone have an idea?


1750 ….mens double channel'd and shoe boots
1762 Men women, boys and girls shoes of all sorts, Shoe-boots,
1767 Pair of half worn English shoe Boots
1775 militia White Stockings, half Boots, black knee Garters.
1783 One pair of Shoeboots [estate inventory]

and...

1772 half worn leather breeches, crown boots, and yarn stockings

Spence
Thanks pretty neat
I wonder how close they were to later
 

David Veale

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Just watched the Patriot last night.
We know that the Patriot was not the tops on historic accuracy 😊
Howsomever We see some patriots hung in a tree. All have Jefferson style booties on. Something that came popular in the nineteenth century.
Most of the people in this movie have boots on.
I’ve seen plenty of paintings showing shoes. Mostly buckled some tied. Or boots, real popular in the army for officers. Lastly high-lows.
Does any one know of an historic reference to what became the Jefferson bootie in eighteenth century?
I would love it as it’s a lot more comfortable then high-lows. And nicer to wear in the woods.
When I trek in eighteenth century dress I cheat and wear my booties... is it historic at all, I’ve yet to find a painting of one.
I actually know the guy who made many if not most of the shoes used in this movie -- and he's top notch in terms of making them all by hand and knows their history as well. I actually had him teach me to make a pair of Jefferson bootees. Can't vouch for producers who had Mr. Gibson's family harvesting bushels of sweet corn instead of field corn (ugh...), but I do believe that this style of shoe was around before Mr. Jefferson popularized it. Can't say where I remember picking up on that though.
 

toot

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well at least they died with there BOOTS ON!! or was that a GEN. GEORGE ARMSTRONG CUSTER film? EROLL FLINN film? now I am dating my self.
 

Packrat

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IMO I think the Jefferson Boots are a tad taller than the brogan
 

toot

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wow a TAD taller, how much is a TAD? not so you would notice it? wouldn't the trousers cover up the top of them? are we splitting hairs here?
 

tenngun

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On English measurement. Much like jack and Gill, cable, stone ect.
Two and a half tads is a bit. A bit is five smeadge, and ten smeadgins. One smeadgin is twelve hairs or seventeen red hairs
 
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