patch material

Discussion in 'Handguns' started by thorr1965, Apr 30, 2019.

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  1. Apr 30, 2019 #1

    thorr1965

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    picked up some pillow ticking today and was wounder if it needs to be washed be for i use it for patches or will it be fine as is. If i remember correctly i read a post on here that stated i need to wash it several time be for use but i could not find the post. So i thought i would just ask to make sure
     
  2. Apr 30, 2019 #2

    tenngun

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    Yeah about four times, last one just plain water.
     
  3. Apr 30, 2019 #3

    arcticap

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    Folks have always said that the material should be washed to remove any sizing sprayed on it from the mill.
    But I've thought that washing it could loosen up the weave.
    I doubt that factory cut patches are washed or ever had any sizing put on the material.
    I doubt that it matters but shows what one of the differences could be between factory and bulk patch material.
    Sometimes I wonder if factory patches do have sizing on them because they seem to be very stiff, especially the pillow ticking.
     
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  4. Apr 30, 2019 #4

    Stony Broke

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    I've tried using patch material both ways over the years and really can't tell the difference. Once you wet the patch, they get just about as pliable whether washed or not. I agree with articap that washing might open up the weave some, and I don't know that it would help the situation.
    If one were using the patches without any lube, it would make a difference...but a wet patch is a wet patch.
     
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  5. Apr 30, 2019 #5

    FishDFly

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    "If one were using the patches without any lube, it would make a difference...but a wet patch is a wet patch."

    Would it make a difference when using Dutch's Dry Formula, washing or not washing the material prior to his method? Opinions from Dutch??

    Seems everyone has a different approach. I know a guy who buys a certain fabric for his patches .

    After he washes it three (3) times, he sends it off to have it teflon coated. He is always on the leader board and has a bunch of "50" patches. He has skill and knowledge, do not believe fabric really cares how many times it is washed.

    I think folks are over thinking shooting M/Ls.
     
  6. Apr 30, 2019 #6

    Grenadier1758

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    Washing the patch material removes the sizing. Drying the material on high heat will cause a slight shrinking of the material that tightens up the weave. The washed patching material will take the lubrication better than unwashed material. Differences may be slight, but patch material should be washed and dried.

    The more supple washed fabric will compress better on loading and fill the grooves better.

    My cotton drill measures 0.017" before washing and 0.018" thick after washing under light compression. Its enough of a difference that I will wash the fabric.
     
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  7. Apr 30, 2019 #7

    FishDFly

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    Back when I bought patching material, I did as you do for the same reasons, that is what I was taught.

    I have since moved onto Teflon and much prefer it. It does cost more, but it brings consistency all the time. Do not have to worry if the patch is too wet or too dry.
     
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  8. Apr 30, 2019 #8

    rafterob

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    If you aren't going to put it in your mouth to lube it as a "spit patch" no need to wash it. But sucking on that fabric with the sizing in it is not very pleasant.
     
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  9. Apr 30, 2019 #9

    BlackHillsBob

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    if you buy a yard of 100 percent pure flax linen medium weight tight weave you will never use cotton pillow ticking again.their is no comparision between the two.linen is wayyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy better for patching material.
     
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  10. Apr 30, 2019 #10

    Ranch 13

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    Run the pillow tic thru the washer just like any other cotton material, hang it on the clothesline to dry, if you put it in the drier it'll shrink a bit and may turn out to be a bit thicker than you wanted. After it's washed then cut it to the width of strips you want.
     
  11. Apr 30, 2019 #11

    Rifleman1776

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    Ditto that. Leaving the sizing in the fabric changes what you are shooting. The sizing becomes part of your patch/lube equation. And, I have no idea how it acts under heat and pressure of shooting.
    Wash, rinse, dry then lube.
     
  12. Apr 30, 2019 #12

    Kansas Jake

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    I've always just washed once and thrown it in the dryer. Consistency is probably the answer. I do spit patches often so don't want to suck on sizing.
     
  13. Apr 30, 2019 #13

    arcticap

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    According to Wikipedia, all textiles have sizing applied which is then washed out [desized] after weaving and before being sold.
    There's different types of sizing formulas depending on the fabric and the manufacturer.
    And some of the characteristics of the sizing may be beneficial to shooters [strength] while others may not be [taste].
    We really don't know if there are sizing residues left in the finished material or not, their amount or ingredients.
    The description of the purposes for using sizing appear to be beneficial - to increase strength, abrasion resistance, adhesion and encapsulation of fibers etc...
    So some sizing residue may be beneficial while others aren't.
    At this time I highly doubt that the commercial patch cutting companies rewash their material prior to cutting.
    I suppose that it's possible that they have their own fabric specifications or sizing formula to help make cutting patches easier in mass quantities, i.e.- with the fabric in the same condition that it's received from the mill.--->>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sizing#Textile_warp_sizing
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2019
  14. Apr 30, 2019 #14

    FishDFly

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    Thanks for your research and efforts.
     
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  15. May 1, 2019 #15

    Stantheman86

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    I dont think people put this much thought into patches in the original period of these firearms, I think they just found something that started easily, was good for a few shots without cleaning and was reasonably accurate.
     
  16. May 1, 2019 #16

    FishDFly

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    I agree with you.

    What comes to mind after reading, "The Pennsylvania-Kentucky Rifle", I was amazed at the vast number of gunsmiths in the area, I would imagine that when a person bought a rifle he did what the gunsmith recommended for shooting. I remember reading in other places that a rifle came with a mold and targets from where the gunsmith shot it. To me the buyer would trust what the maker recommended for patches, lube and powder charge.

    I doubt many shooters wandered into the local mercantile with a micrometer to measure the cloth.

    They bought what seemed about right, if to thick, bought some a thinner.
     
  17. May 1, 2019 #17

    S.Kenton

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    I agree with you, however being a competitive shooter, I’ve tried both, washing and non washing with the exact same ticking. I’ve found literally no difference in accuracy between the two methods, off a rest, using the same measure of powder and the same roundball at 50 yards. That was three years ago, I’ve since moved and now have a 150 yard maximum range at my house... I may revisit that same experiment at a little longer yardage. Good thread...
     
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  18. May 1, 2019 #18

    longcruise

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    I wash it hot and dry it hot. It removes the sizing and tightens the weave. I read long ago that the sizing can be abrasive. I'm not sure either way on that score.

    Another reason to wash it is it's often treated with insecticides. I have bought some that you could smell it on. Once I was able to smell it while walking down the aisle in the cloth dept at Walmart.
     
  19. May 1, 2019 #19

    Rifleman1776

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    Thanks Wiki. That source if every bit as reliable as "I heard" and "someone said".
    The fabrics I buy (mostly pillow ticking) very notably have sizing in them.
     
  20. May 1, 2019 #20

    arcticap

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    Sure Wiki can make mistakes but it's hardly the same as hearsay.
    There are footnotes and external links, and many entries are written by experts.
    For instance, the entry about "sizing" leads to another entry about "textile manufacturing" with many detailed facts, footnotes and photos about cotton textile processing and
    the equipment used.
    Like I said there's footnote after footnote.
    For instance, under desizing this section states:
    "Depending on the size that has been used, the cloth may be steeped in a dilute acid and then rinsed, or enzymes may be used to break down the size.[27]"

    Do you think that they faked the photos and all of the detailed info. is fake news?
    I guess that some folks don't want to know the details because they come from Wiki and would rather attack it.
    But who uses encyclopedias anymore when there's so much info. at our fingertips that is referenced.
    Take a look and read some of these relevant sections regarding cotton textile processing.
    It's so detailed and referenced that anyone would realize that it's not hearsay at all but rather highly technical information. --->>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Textile_manufacturing
    Or perhaps it's all a Russian plot to make us think that fictions are actually facts. ;)
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2019

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