Painted Stocks

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I'm interested in the Painted Stocks muskets that were traded to Natives or whatever. Any comments, sites, or articles I can access that mention them would be interesting. Let's gin up some interest! Thanks!
 
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Here’s one I got in just yesterday from Clay Smith:

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I really like it! From my research, the natives enjoyed the painted guns and there are references to multiple colors/patterns being offered for the early trade guns, as well as various shades of woods. There is at least one period painting showing a native armed with a painted trade gun. The Bumford gun is an early original and it features painted on vinework.

Do a Google for “painted trade guns forum” and it’ll pop up with a lot of threads from here and the American Long Rifle forum detailing these guns. Good luck!
 

Brokennock

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I'm interested in the Painted Stocks muskets that were traded to Natives or whatever. Any comments, sites, or articles I can access that mention them would be interesting. Let's gin up some interest! Thanks!
There are a couple articles in PDF format that have been posted to this forum.
If you search painted "musket," you probably won't find them.
Search for topics that discuss the, "Type-G trade gun," or the, "Carolina Gun." Same gun.
If I find the PDF later I will try to post it here.
 
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The highly-figured, curly-moe-shemp, exquisite fancy 4X maple stocks are beautiful and popular, but a plain-jane stock is a nice basic relief from the hundred-stripes-to-the-inch high-end stocks. A handsome barn gun, SMR, or painted gun is a nice break from admiring the prize-winning customs!
 
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Here is mine. It’s a Mike Brooks via Allen Martin. It took forever to figure out a roundball load but I’ve got it down now.
 

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hanshi

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I think painted stocks can be really neat and wouldn't mind having a painted trade gun myself. If the wood already has nice wood patterns it would be a shame to cover it up with paint. But for a plain stock nothing is lost by painting one it.
 
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Fisherking,
That rifle is insanely beautiful. You are most fortunate.

I am SO lucky. I bought six flintlocks in three or four months and two are Mike Brooks and one is an Allen Martin. This rifle was the first purchase and is probably my favorite. Unfortunately, in my circle, no one appreciates them- my friends think my appreciation and affection is strange.

*don’t care. :)
 

Brokennock

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I think painted stocks can be really neat and wouldn't mind having a painted trade gun myself. If the wood already has nice wood patterns it would be a shame to cover it up with paint. But for a plain stock nothing is lost by painting one it.
I could be wrong, and I am having trouble finding the PDF article about these guns, but my impression is that these trade guns were mostly stocked in plain beechwood. Thus, painting them is an improvement.
 
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How do you treat the gun when cleaning? How do you deal with scuffs when in the field.
After cleaning my gun I dry and oil the metal. Buff the brass then rub oil in the stock.
How smooth is it to the touch
Do you add a wax over it?
 

sportster73hp

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I have a mauser that someone decided needed a pistol grip stock. The extra wood was grafted on and didnt take stain so Dad decided to paint it. 30 years later the paint has worn thru showing the wood grain . Looks cool. Have any trade muskets been found with this effect?
 
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I could be wrong, and I am having trouble finding the PDF article about these guns, but my impression is that these trade guns were mostly stocked in plain beechwood. Thus, painting them is an improvement.
That isn’t what I have read but I’ll let someone more knowledgeable than I answer that.

I’ve heard that very few were Beech and most were walnut. Where I read that would take some backtracking.
 

Brokennock

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That isn’t what I have read but I’ll let someone more knowledgeable than I answer that.

I’ve heard that very few were Beech and most were walnut. Where I read that would take some backtracking.
You very well could be correct.
Either way, I don't think they were usually made of highly figured wood and then painted, at least not the ones painted a solid color.
 

Bushfire

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The highly-figured, curly-moe-shemp, exquisite fancy 4X maple stocks are beautiful and popular, but a plain-jane stock is a nice basic relief from the hundred-stripes-to-the-inch high-end stocks. A handsome barn gun, SMR, or painted gun is a nice break from admiring the prize-winning customs!
I wholeheartedly agree, I get dazzled by maple stripes when I open the safe but my favourite is the plain (I think) cherry fusil.
 

jimhallam

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The Birmingham Trade frequently produced "muskets" with painted stocks -- - reduced the cost and made them more saleable to the "native trade".
Of course, it was not restricted to stocks. Pedersoli produced a DB percussion gun which had a "printed" barrel in the early days -- looked just like damascus.

Even more likely was what went on in the Belgian Trade, especially for cheap exports .... still being made well into the 1930s and maybe later.
 
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