• Friends, our 2nd Amendment rights are always under attack and the NRA has been a constant for decades in helping fight that fight.

    We have partnered with the NRA to offer you a discount on membership and Muzzleloading Forum gets a small percentage too of each membership, so you are supporting both the NRA and us.

    Use this link to sign up please; https://membership.nra.org/recruiters/join/XR045103

Oxidized balls, think they will be a problem?

Muzzleloading Forum

Help Support Muzzleloading Forum:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.
Joined
Nov 6, 2023
Messages
69
Reaction score
94
Location
Ohio
Last month I bought a box of Hornady .454 round balls at a gun show. When I opened the box up later I discovered they are all oxidized, almost crusty. I'm not sure how this could happen unless they were under water at some point. I'm going to shoot a few Wednesday to see what if any effect the oxidation has on accuracy. If I need to I'll just melt them down and recast. Have you ever run into this?
 
I've shot oxidized ball before. Back in the day, I think it was TC, sold .490 round balls in a blister pack with a white cardboard background. I used to get them (at the grocery store. Yep, that's country) and once most of the whole pack was that way. I was new to BP so didn't know enough to know if it was a problem or not. So I shot them with no problems.
 
I've shot oxidized ball before. Back in the day, I think it was TC, sold .490 round balls in a blister pack with a white cardboard background. I used to get them (at the grocery store. Yep, that's country) and once most of the whole pack was that way. I was new to BP so didn't know enough to know if it was a problem or not. So I shot them with no problems.
I've got some around here somewhere that I bought when I got my first BP rifle. Pretty sure I gottem at KMart. In like a plastic ball pouch deal. They were marketed by T/C, CVA or Traditions maybe? They are geener than the statue of Liberty. I'll try and dig them up and take a picture. Good for a laugh.
 
I did a search on oxidized lead, and if you believe in what you find, it sounds like the dust from the oxidization is extremely hazardous to young children possibly causing mental retardation. Be certain to wash your hands after handling as the dust can enter the body through rubbing the eyes, nose, or mouth. What I read said that older people can handle the contamination better but it is still a hazard.
 
Last month I bought a box of Hornady .454 round balls at a gun show. When I opened the box up later I discovered they are all oxidized, almost crusty. I'm not sure how this could happen unless they were under water at some point. I'm going to shoot a few Wednesday to see what if any effect the oxidation has on accuracy. If I need to I'll just melt them down and recast. Have you ever run into this?
They'll shoot just fine in your revolver, just don't put them in your mouth. That lead oxidation is poisonous and can make you sick... also, don't lick your fingers after handling them unless you wipe or wash them off.
 
I have heard that lead oxide is harder than lead and abrasive. Don’t know how true that is and if it is true, would the abrasive properties harm the bore? More so in a revolver due to the fact that it is not patched. One would think that the patch would protect the bore of a rifle.

I don’t shoot .22 LR ammo if the projectile is oxidized due to this exact concern.
 
It's really not a good idea to ingest lead in any form. At least you can see the white oxidation. I echo the previous poster - WD40 or similar and a towel will remove the visible white stuff if rubbed long enough. Applying "WD" or similar substances to old, loaded ammo is asking for trouble b/c some things will soak into the cartridge/primer and "Kill" that round entirely or cause a squib load.

Pinching old sinkers with your teeth ain't healthy, either. Don't bite the bullet. Shoot 'em.
 
I have heard that lead oxide is harder than lead and abrasive. Don’t know how true that is and if it is true, would the abrasive properties harm the bore? More so in a revolver due to the fact that it is not patched. One would think that the patch would protect the bore of a rifle.

I don’t shoot .22 LR ammo if the projectile is oxidized due to this exact concern.
Lead oxide on lead balls is a powder. It may perhaps be abrasive, but that powder comes off on your hands when you handle it and it doesn't feel abrasive. It's certainly not harder than lead in that powder form. Since we're shooting patched balls, I wouldn't worry about it at all because that lead ball never touches the inside of the bore, just the patch does.

I have to admit I shot plenty of .22 rounds that were oxidized with no "apparent" wear over the years. We were always shooting ground squirrels on Grandpa's ranch because he could only poison them every three years. Still, the .22 shells will actually contact the rifling and the bore, so that's different than using a patched ball and your reticence is certainly understandable.
 
I would think, excessive oxide could cause problems on patched round ball in tight spots in barrels.

Changes the diameter?
I don't think it would matter? I shoot .530 amd .535 balls in my .54 rifle and both work fine accuracy is good with both. I also find tight loads are very accurate!
 
Back
Top