Over 50 hours of carving later...

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Jerry Samouce

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Ok.... sigh... back stretch...
50 hours of work later...

I just finished carving on my 1st Virginia rifle for my NC Militia reenactment persona...
Based off of my Scottish relative Samuel Whiteside who lived near Whiteside Mountain NC.

1st two videos will be a prestain grand tour of my results.

The 3rd video is a question for you experienced folks.



 

azmntman

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Insanely nice! However, for me/my practical purposes to put that kinda art on a gun I will hunt with (I do HUNT my guns) would be like polishing the tread of your tires.

Again, insanely nice work!
 

Nameless Hunter

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That would be nice... however I don't yet know how to do that...

Any advice?
All above my pay grade, but I'm sure there are several members who can help with ideas. Your wood carving is very nice, just seems like the brass needs to match it. 😁

I'm still waiting on my Kibler to arrive, and have got to get at it on my practice maple pieces. I am just hoping my simple efforts turn out half as good as your work.
 

theC525

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This is some nice looking work. I just want to point out that it's kind of hard to tell but it looks a little high and sharp. Easy fix, take some 0000 steelwool and LIGHTLY go over your carving to soften the edges. Question, why did you darken the work with a pencil? Was it for detail? Usually that is done with more "body" carving. You need to round the edges over and carve some detail into the leaves, giving things a 3D effect. That patch box is very nice but right now it's "flat" the same with the cheek piece side and tang area of the rifle. Are those Oak leaves around the forward pin? Very nicely done but again they lack definition/ body. Afew angled cuts with a knife and some shallow gouges along with some light sanding on the "in between" and you'd have some "body" going on. As far as your inlay goes, I suggest the smaller of the two. Drill holes for your pins first and get your inlay positioned on the wood where you want it first, then pin it down to the wood and "scribe" around it with your knife first. Go over it at least twice before you pull out your pins and THEN do your bend (it won't be as much as you think ). Try to remove your field as evenly as you can with small micro carving tools, remember to keep your points and edges clean.
What color are you planning on staining this rifle, dark or light? Depending on the color you choose the pencil lead may ( if you do a light "honey"/ yellow color) or may not (darker reddish brown or brown) show up. It looks neat in the light on your video, almost silver and if it comes out may add some very interesting "personality" to your gun.
Pleas know that I am not trying to insult you. I have spent weeks carving on a rifle and well understand the time and effort you have put into this project. Al I'm saying is that you can make it "more better", you can make it POP, keep going!
 

.36Rooster

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This is some nice looking work. I just want to point out that it's kind of hard to tell but it looks a little high and sharp. Easy fix, take some 0000 steelwool and LIGHTLY go over your carving to soften the edges. Question, why did you darken the work with a pencil? Was it for detail? Usually that is done with more "body" carving. You need to round the edges over and carve some detail into the leaves, giving things a 3D effect. That patch box is very nice but right now it's "flat" the same with the cheek piece side and tang area of the rifle. Are those Oak leaves around the forward pin? Very nicely done but again they lack definition/ body. Afew angled cuts with a knife and some shallow gouges along with some light sanding on the "in between" and you'd have some "body" going on. As far as your inlay goes, I suggest the smaller of the two. Drill holes for your pins first and get your inlay positioned on the wood where you want it first, then pin it down to the wood and "scribe" around it with your knife first. Go over it at least twice before you pull out your pins and THEN do your bend (it won't be as much as you think ). Try to remove your field as evenly as you can with small micro carving tools, remember to keep your points and edges clean.
What color are you planning on staining this rifle, dark or light? Depending on the color you choose the pencil lead may ( if you do a light "honey"/ yellow color) or may not (darker reddish brown or brown) show up. It looks neat in the light on your video, almost silver and if it comes out may add some very interesting "personality" to your gun.
Pleas know that I am not trying to insult you. I have spent weeks carving on a rifle and well understand the time and effort you have put into this project. Al I'm saying is that you can make it "more better", you can make it POP, keep going!
There's two types of critics, the ones who make you better and help you you grow, and the ones who just want to tear you down.

I would say this guy is of the first type. And I would be honored to have both your skill and his criticism.

Excellent work.
 

Jerry Samouce

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This is some nice looking work. I just want to point out that it's kind of hard to tell but it looks a little high and sharp. Easy fix, take some 0000 steelwool and LIGHTLY go over your carving to soften the edges. Question, why did you darken the work with a pencil? Was it for detail? Usually that is done with more "body" carving. You need to round the edges over and carve some detail into the leaves, giving things a 3D effect. That patch box is very nice but right now it's "flat" the same with the cheek piece side and tang area of the rifle. Are those Oak leaves around the forward pin? Very nicely done but again they lack definition/ body. Afew angled cuts with a knife and some shallow gouges along with some light sanding on the "in between" and you'd have some "body" going on. As far as your inlay goes, I suggest the smaller of the two. Drill holes for your pins first and get your inlay positioned on the wood where you want it first, then pin it down to the wood and "scribe" around it with your knife first. Go over it at least twice before you pull out your pins and THEN do your bend (it won't be as much as you think ). Try to remove your field as evenly as you can with small micro carving tools, remember to keep your points and edges clean.
What color are you planning on staining this rifle, dark or light? Depending on the color you choose the pencil lead may ( if you do a light "honey"/ yellow color) or may not (darker reddish brown or brown) show up. It looks neat in the light on your video, almost silver and if it comes out may add some very interesting "personality" to your gun.
Pleas know that I am not trying to insult you. I have spent weeks carving on a rifle and well understand the time and effort you have put into this project. Al I'm saying is that you can make it "more better", you can make it POP, keep going!
Wow! Thanks for all of the information! Here is what I am planning to use as a finish.

It is fairly dark. I have used the pencil technique before on furniture with a darker Danish oil... The pencil turns dark but also sort of devolves into a shadow effect...

Here is what I order from tracking the wolf.
Screenshot_20210131-094827_Chrome.jpg
 

Jerry Samouce

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Any suggestions on what I can use, or where I can get a tool to carve that star?
01-17757x5-1.jpg
 

martin9

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By carve I think you mean engrave the star? I get my gravers from MBS. Not sure who makes em' but they sharpen and cut nicely.
 

LongJnSilver

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Ok.... sigh... back stretch...
50 hours of work later...

I just finished carving on my 1st Virginia rifle for my NC Militia reenactment persona...
Based off of my Scottish relative Samuel Whiteside who lived near Whiteside Mountain NC.

1st two videos will be a prestain grand tour of my results.

The 3rd video is a question for you experienced folks.



FANTASTIC WORK, Jerry! Can't wait to see it all done. I'M IMPRESSED! - Johnny -
 

totonap

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So so Jealous. I wish I can do have as nice as you. I couldn't take it out hunting, But love to shoot it and just stare at it.
 

theC525

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Any suggestions on what I can use, or where I can get a tool to carve that star?View attachment 64149
If you are asking about inletting the star I use an exacto knife with a #11 blade, I grind off about a 1/16" of the tip ( grind at about a 30 angle and buff the blade on a wheel, it's like strapping the blade) so it will not snap off in the wood while I'm carving/ cutting. As for engravers, you can get them fron Track or Rio Grand I would get a 5 line shader an oglet and a knife graver. You will need to put handles on them, also you'll need a lite chasing hammer, I got a nice one at A.C. Moore in the jewelry making section, You need to sharpen them with/ at a 45 degree angle with about a 30 degree angle on the under side so that you can "peel out" of your work. Remember, they MUST be sharp or you'll booger it all up, check them by pushing the tip against your thumb nail, if they skip and leave a white line they aren't sharp, if they hit and stick they are ready (kind of like checking a fishing hook). Track offers a good book about engraving, "The Art of Engraving" that I would suggest you get before going forward. Practice on something else like you did with the carving before you go for the star. Remember to keep a steady hand and DON'T RUSH, if you get off a bit don't try to go back over it and correct it, just work it in to the design, otherwise it will look like ass.
As a gun smith you have to be proficient in several things like metal fabrication, wood carving, lock smithing and engraving, all of these things come together to build a gun that is graceful and pleasing to one's eye. As for those people who say "I'd never take it hunting" SHAME on them! I have built myself and others rifles into the 5000.00 range and shoot matches and hunt with them all the time. Why not? That's what they were intended for!
Matter of fact, if I hear "I'd never take it hunting" I usually up the price by 500.00!
 
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As for those people who say "I'd never take it hunting" SHAME on them! I have built myself and others rifles into the 5000.00 range and shoot matches and hunt with them all the time. Why not? That's what they were intended for!
Matter of fact, if I hear "I'd never take it hunting" I usually up the price by 500.00!
A'yup, could not agree more.
 

Jerry Samouce

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If you are asking about inletting the star I use an exacto knife with a #11 blade, I grind off about a 1/16" of the tip ( grind at about a 30 angle and buff the blade on a wheel, it's like strapping the blade) so it will not snap off in the wood while I'm carving/ cutting. As for engravers, you can get them fron Track or Rio Grand I would get a 5 line shader an oglet and a knife graver. You will need to put handles on them, also you'll need a lite chasing hammer, I got a nice one at A.C. Moore in the jewelry making section, You need to sharpen them with/ at a 45 degree angle with about a 30 degree angle on the under side so that you can "peel out" of your work. Remember, they MUST be sharp or you'll booger it all up, check them by pushing the tip against your thumb nail, if they skip and leave a white line they aren't sharp, if they hit and stick they are ready (kind of like checking a fishing hook). Track offers a good book about engraving, "The Art of Engraving" that I would suggest you get before going forward. Practice on something else like you did with the carving before you go for the star. Remember to keep a steady hand and DON'T RUSH, if you get off a bit don't try to go back over it and correct it, just work it in to the design, otherwise it will look like ass.
As a gun smith you have to be proficient in several things like metal fabrication, wood carving, lock smithing and engraving, all of these things come together to build a gun that is graceful and pleasing to one's eye. As for those people who say "I'd never take it hunting" SHAME on them! I have built myself and others rifles into the 5000.00 range and shoot matches and hunt with them all the time. Why not? That's what they were intended for!
Matter of fact, if I hear "I'd never take it hunting" I usually up the price by 500.00!
Looking at Rio Grande..... Hmmmm...
What do the # differences on gravers mean? IE: #14, #10 #8 ???
 
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Looking at Rio Grande..... Hmmmm...
What do the # differences on gravers mean? IE: #14, #10 #8 ???
Specifications:
  • Brand : E.C. Muller
  • Dimensions : 4"L x 2.0mmW
  • Material : Carbon steel
  • Size : #10
  • Style : Line
  • Country of origin : United States
Additional Specifications:
  • Width between lines, #10: 0.125mm
    Face width (approx.): 0.75mm
 
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