Quantcast

Old time jags, worms, etc

Help Support Muzzle Loading Forum:

Marc Adamchek

54 Cal.
Joined
May 17, 2005
Messages
1,650
Reaction score
9
I feel a little silly carrying shiny brass jags and other ramrod (ok, wiping stick) tools in my shooting bag to help out with loading, cleaning, etc. Lately I've seen some really beautiful old greyish ones that look like they came straight out of the 18th century that would look great in a shooting bag to accompany a flintlock or two (or three or...)

Does anybody know what I am referring to here and if so, where I can purchase these items? They sure would go a long way to bringing my shooting bags back a long way, if you catch my drift.
 

Rifleman1776

Cannon
MLF Supporter
Joined
May 26, 2011
Messages
16,644
Reaction score
1,163
Location
Arkansas Ozarks
Just use yer brass and/or wipe with dirty patches until it takes on that ole timey looking dirtiness. No need to replace other than personal want.
 

Pukka Bundook

45 Cal.
Joined
Jun 28, 2007
Messages
907
Reaction score
449
Location
Alberta Canada.
You can make them yourself, if your brass ones are a bit new-style looking.

These are homemade and turned in an electric drill, no need for fancy equipment.
Rifles homemade too, but that doesn't count!
DSCN2428.JPG
 

Zonie

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
MLF Supporter
Joined
Oct 4, 2003
Messages
32,239
Reaction score
5,757
Location
Phoenix, AZ
I feel a little silly carrying shiny brass jags and other ramrod (ok, wiping stick) tools in my shooting bag to help out with loading, cleaning, etc. Lately I've seen some really beautiful old greyish ones that look like they came straight out of the 18th century that would look great in a shooting bag to accompany a flintlock or two (or three or...)

Does anybody know what I am referring to here and if so, where I can purchase these items? They sure would go a long way to bringing my shooting bags back a long way, if you catch my drift.
I have a jag that looks rather gray colored. I don't use it though.

My reason for not using it is, it is made out of aluminum. The aluminum threads are very weak and likely to fail if I need to pull a stuck jag out of the barrel.

Although I'm not into period correct thinking, another reason not to use aluminum jags is, back "during the days" aluminum was more valuable than gold or platinum. In fact, outside a laboratory it was virtually not in existence.

Aluminum was so valuable that in the 1880's when they built the Washington Monument, they tipped its pointed spire with a piece of it.

IMO, a well used brass jag is stronger and more suitable for a muzzleloader. Brass was commonly available and almost all of the old muzzleloaders used it for one thing or another.
If you use a brass jag and don't clean it after you use it, it will develop a nice dark, "used" look that is hard to beat. :)
 

Stophel

75 Cal.
Joined
Jul 8, 2005
Messages
5,824
Reaction score
579
What are those weird duckbill and screw-head-looking things? Bore scrapers?
 

rich pierce

70 Cal.
Joined
Nov 27, 2004
Messages
5,107
Reaction score
1,027
Location
St. Louis, Mo
I think the duckbill ones must be for a smoothbore. Maybe to loosen fierce fouling? The breech scrapers are pretty cool. I like the ones with button ends. Probably work just like modern jags.
 

Marc Adamchek

54 Cal.
Joined
May 17, 2005
Messages
1,650
Reaction score
9
I have a jag that looks rather gray colored. I don't use it though.

My reason for not using it is, it is made out of aluminum. The aluminum threads are very weak and likely to fail if I need to pull a stuck jag out of the barrel.

Although I'm not into period correct thinking, another reason not to use aluminum jags is, back "during the days" aluminum was more valuable than gold or platinum. In fact, outside a laboratory it was virtually not in existence.

Aluminum was so valuable that in the 1880's when they built the Washington Monument, they tipped its pointed spire with a piece of it.

IMO, a well used brass jag is stronger and more suitable for a muzzleloader. Brass was commonly available and almost all of the old muzzleloaders used it for one thing or another.
If you use a brass jag and don't clean it after you use it, it will develop a nice dark, "used" look that is hard to beat. :)
Well, ok, but I've been using most of these for close to 15 years or more and they still look pretty "brassy" to me! I mean, I NEVER clean the brass on any of my guns, and some of it turns a real nice reddish brown, other just nice and dull. Just not the same with the little doo-hickeys for some reason......
 

Smokey Plainsman

50 Cal.
MLF Supporter
Joined
Jul 26, 2014
Messages
2,809
Reaction score
1,343
Here is my shooting bag contents:
In the lower left, you can see a ball screw and tow worm. Tow is the fluffy tan material, it is just course fiber byproducts of flax (or hemp), and is a traditional gun cleaning material. You pull off a wad of tow and wrap it around the worm and use that to scrub the bore. The ramrod on my rifle has a tapered tip to accept the worm and ball screw. This is an authentic and period correct setup. I normally use a range rod and modern brass jags when at the range, but like to go fully traditional for hunting and field shooting out of the bag.
 

jbwilliams3

45 Cal.
Joined
Dec 23, 2006
Messages
663
Reaction score
101
Lots of craftsman out there make traditional iron worms/pullers, etc. Larry Callahan is one of the few whom you can buy from easily right off his website. He makes the best bag moulds out there too, by the way. The balls that come from those moulds are as precise as they can be, whilst the mould fits right in with a living history set up.

Anyhow, kudos to you for recognizing that. For all of the modern stuff that creeps into traditional muzzleloading, it’s nice to keep things operating as they once were, including two worms! I still use modern jags for full cleaning, but in the field, it’s nice to use a tow worm.
 
Top