Old longrifle identification

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Lfpdlt

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I get it. Went from "Just picked up this old rifle" to now going to the local shop for parts and makin it right. Thats great. Have at it. Enjoy your work. Its your rifle after all. The reason so many current examples are bitched up.
James
So are you saying it would be better left in 2 pieces held together with kite string?Starting to sense some sarcasm in your replys.
 
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So are you saying it would be better left in 2 pieces held together with kite string?Starting to sense some sarcasm in your replys.
Yes it would be unless it was restored by someone who knew what they are doing. But get some Gorrilla Glue and have at it though since its your money. Dont want to have it in 2 pieces now. That would ruin the value.
James
 
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Uh.
I bet the new owner would appreciate some actual advice.
You've posted lots of other comments that were intelligent and useful.
Not so much, here tonight.
Just the way I'm seeing these comments. Maybe I'm misinterpreting....
Well. I gave advice and it was not received with sound judgement. I am certainly not an authority on this rifle nor am I the owner. So the OP may do what he wishes with the ole rifle he just picked up since he knows all about it now and its in two pieces. Its his money and property what can I say? None of my business really.
James
 
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It would be nice to keep it as is, and make a copy of it. If only that ole girl could talk

I would try and work on getting the trigger guard replaced based on whats left of the original parts.

I would just wax it up with Johnson's paste wax, and leave it alone as far as the rest.

Fascinating piece of history
 
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IF...and a very big IF!
This rifle is restored by someone who knows what they are doing it will be much improved in appearance and value (I lost my best friend less than a month ago who could have done this).

If it is messed with by someone who does not know what they are doing it will be irreparably harmed.

I would be looking for someone to restore it but someone with the necessary skills will also not be cheap.
 

Robby

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Well, I hope there is some way to put the gun whole again without loosing the personality it has earned. Somehow, that cord binding must be kept, classic!!!!
Robby
 

Lfpdlt

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Ok I seem to have ruffled some feathers over the future of this rifle. I will be keeping the rifle for my own personal enjoyment, to admire for many years to come, and daydream about the stories it could tell, which unfortunately it cannot. There is no known history of this piece other than who made it, where, and approximately when. I have no idea when and how the damage was incurred, and can only speculate. Monetary value is the least important part of this rifle to me as it is not for sale. I was not looking for this rifle. It found me, for the whopping asking price of $25 (and I gladly paid double the asking price). More experienced people here than me seem to feel it is worthy of the services of a professional restorer and should not be monkeyed with by an amateur, which I can respect. My vision for this rifle is to have it stabilized and mostly complete. I have no plans to have it turned into a shooter or made to look like new. I love the character of the rifle and want to keep it with it’s well earned scars. I just want to stop the further deterioration of this old beauty. So, in your more experienced opinions than mine, what would you estimate as possible cost have this work done, and who are some experts you would recommend?
 

excess650

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I heard a rumor that the Ferree rifle recently discovered and sold at auction (Broken in two at the wrist) will be about a 5 or 6k restoration.
That Ferree brought $12K and if the restoration is $5-6K, the total is just a fraction of its value because its an early rifle.

Regarding the J Roop, my first reaction at the photos was "Upper Susquehanna" and the rifle combined with the name and family history adds value to collectors. It needs restoration, but it needs to be done correctly for real value.
 

Notchy Bob

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That is an interesting rifle. I've heard of Roop, but don't know much about him. I believe a couple of the builders who frequent the ALR Forum have produced some copies of Roop rifles, so his work is known and respected by at least a few.

It sounds to me as if the subject rifle in this thread found itself a good home.

I haven't seen any comments on the powder horn that came with it (re photos 8, 9, and 10 in post #2). That's a nice, old, workingman's horn. I like it a lot. I've seen photos of a lot of 19th century horns with a big, flat-head wood screw in the base for a strap button, like that one has. I think it was common practice. And yet, the maker did a careful job carving the tip. It's a nice horn.

Best regards,

Notchy Bob
 

Lfpdlt

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That is an interesting rifle. I've heard of Roop, but don't know much about him. I believe a couple of the builders who frequent the ALR Forum have produced some copies of Roop rifles, so his work is known and respected by at least a few.

It sounds to me as if the subject rifle in this thread found itself a good home.

I haven't seen any comments on the powder horn that came with it (re photos 8, 9, and 10 in post #2). That's a nice, old, workingman's horn. I like it a lot. I've seen photos of a lot of 19th century horns with a big, flat-head wood screw in the base for a strap button, like that one has. I think it was common practice. And yet, the maker did a careful job carving the tip. It's a nice horn.

Best regards,

Notchy Bob
Thank you, sir.
 
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