OK, we are going to carry some lube

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So....
I have decided to try some Ballistol water mix at a 4:1 ratio per Grenadier's recc's (Thank you!)

I am going to carry it to the range in a plastic bottle.

This gets me thinking (always dangerous) We read about our backwoods hero's using a piece of greased cloth to load their PRB and I think we have discounted carrying grease in most original patch boxes due to there being no evidence of migration of the grease in to the wood on said originals.

How did they carry their lubes? David Cooke's hunting bag shows no grease container nor do the (very limited number) of other original bags I have seen.

What would be the HC/PC way of carrying lube while in the field? Any documentation that you are aware of would be welcomed.
 

Loyalist Dave

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Well you mentioned extant examples of guns with grease in the patch box or a tallow hole. We may not like to do that, but "they" apparently had no qualms about it. My. 40 has a two chambered area under it's wooden patch box and the smaller of the two has bullet lube within it.

Another reason why you may not find any "gease" marks in existing, antique rifle bags, is that they may have attached the strip of patching material to the bag strap. The bag itself may also have been waterproofed with the same grease, so how would we know what was on the bag from waterproofing and what was from the patching material?

I use a turned, wooden box. I use the grease for patching, for rust prevention, for lock lube, to keep my ramrod supple, for the skin on my face if the wind is causing the skin to chap, as a moccasin dressing for water resistance, and in an emergency, I can use it as a candle. So my container is larger than a wooden pill box. Might not be correct as per history, but it's not an invalid method of carrying the grease.
Here something similar that I found to mine, online... Wooden Rounds

LD
 

Spence10

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_Travels Through the States of North America and the Provinces of Upper and Lower Canada, During the Years of 1795, 1796 and 1797_, by Isaac Weld, Jr., a young Englishman.
"The best of powder is chosen for the rifle barrel gun, and after a proper proportion of it is put down the barrel, the ball is enclosed in a small bit of linen rag, well greased at the outside, and then forced down with a thick ramrod. The grease and the bits of rag, which are called patches, are carried in a little box at the butt-end of the gun."

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A altoids tin works nice, carefully peen the embossing out of the lid then toss the tin in a fire a bit too burn off the paint let cool and steel wool it give it a coat of wax or light oil on the outside. It is a nice size and rides well in the bag. Mine has my home made patch lube and a couple of pre lubed patches in it. If I cut patching at the muzzle it is a lubed strip attached too the bag strap, on occasions I will also carry pre lubed patches in the patch box. As a side note I have made and use a leather kit that holds such items as needed (maybe) on a hunt, items such as a turn scew,hand made pliers, extra flints and jaw leather, a square of linen for a rag, feather for a touch hole plug,extra vent pick, ect. also there are two small bottles with cork stoppers that contain sweet oil and home made cleaning solvent The bottles are insulin bottles my late father gave me. this kit works well for the hunt and fits nicely in a haversack. I really do think the old boys would never leave for a hunt with out a few extra items in there bags.
 
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I use a empty cap tin to keep a small amount of mink oil in my shooting bag. They are handy and I have a few around. As Loyalist Dave said you can use it for many things out hunting.
 
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I've looked at a number of originals that had grease residue in metal patch boxes. Most common guns were from Snyder , Union ,Bedford, Blair , ,Huntingdon , and Centre Counties. Most were probably made and used before 1855 in central Pa.. Some Pittsburgh,and Monongahela River valley guns also had grease holes in the right side of the butt stock. S. McCosh guns from Pgh. , Pa. , had a rotating grease hole cover on the right side of the butt stock................oldwood
 
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From what I understand...........Ballistols were ruthlessly hunted down by Indians , to allow their main source of food, the near extinct at the time , black bear , to survive. Ballistols , reportedly have a bitter flavor , while black bear tallow mixed with maple tree syrup was excellent in flavor. Wild game meat was plunged into melted , warm , maple/bear tallow mix and was excellent fare , according to White captive , James Smith , circa 1757.............Sorry for this possibly errant diatribe. I'm old and easily entertained.........oldwood.. :thumb:
 

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While an altoids tin type metal box might be debatable as to historical correctness, many of us use them and similar for several things.
So, I'll share a couple tips.
If one doesn't want to deal with the embossed logo I have two options for you.
Trader Joe's grocery stores carry tins of Ginger Mints at the registers that come in the same hinged tin, but the graphics are just painted or printed on, no need to hammer out embossed lettering. (Also the mints are really good) While there grab a bag or three of their organic all natural beef or buffalo jerky, probably the best of the store bought commercial jerkys I've tried. If you get the "original" I think it's called, their is also no soy.
Another option is, Specialty Bottle Company,
Hinged altoid type tins, slip top round and square tins, screw top round tins, and of course bottles. (No I don't work for them)
If all you are carrying in it is lube I like product THN2 or their smallest screw top round tin. Here is the smallest rectangle with common muzzleloading items for scale,
20211113_090454.jpg20211113_090519.jpg20211113_090603.jpg
Ball is .610
 
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Colterkid

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I'm sure containers made of horn or tins carried extra grease, some frease or tallow would be found in every critter shot but I have my doubts there were any Ballistols left in the country by the 18th century. Ballistols were hunted nearly to extinction in this country.
That's funny. Them thar Ballistols were killed out in our area.
 

Colterkid

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While an altoids tin type metal box might be debatable as to historical correctness, many of us use then an similar for several things.
So, I'll share a couple tips.
If one doesn't want to deal with the embossed logo I have two options for you.
Trader Joe's grocery stores carry tins of Ginger Mints at the registers that come in the same hinged tin, but the graphics are just painted or printed on, no need to hammer out embossed lettering. (Also the mints are really good) While there grab a bag or three of their organic all natural beef or buffalo jerky, probably the best of the store bought commercial jerkys I've tried. If you get the "original" I think it's called, their is also no soy.
Another option is, Specialty Bottle Company,
Hinged altoid type tins, slip top round and square tins, screw top round tins, and of course bottles. (No I don't work for them)
If all you are carrying in it is lube I like product THN2 or their smallest screw top round tin. Here is the smallest rectangle with common muzzleloading items for scale,
View attachment 104303View attachment 104304View attachment 104305
Ball is .610
Thanks for the link Brokennock.
 

Colterkid

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Well you mentioned extant examples of guns with grease in the patch box or a tallow hole. We may not like to do that, but "they" apparently had no qualms about it. My. 40 has a two chambered area under it's wooden patch box and the smaller of the two has bullet lube within it.

Another reason why you may not find any "gease" marks in existing, antique rifle bags, is that they may have attached the strip of patching material to the bag strap. The bag itself may also have been waterproofed with the same grease, so how would we know what was on the bag from waterproofing and what was from the patching material?

I use a turned, wooden box. I use the grease for patching, for rust prevention, for lock lube, to keep my ramrod supple, for the skin on my face if the wind is causing the skin to chap, as a moccasin dressing for water resistance, and in an emergency, I can use it as a candle. So my container is larger than a wooden pill box. Might not be correct as per history, but it's not an invalid method of carrying the grease.
Here something similar that I found to mine, online... Wooden Rounds

LD
Thanks for the link to the Wooden Boxes.
 

JB67

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I think natural grease and oils would leave a different residue than mineral oils. How much antique wood food wares do we see with no apparent grease stains because they have absorbed into and oxidized with the wood itself? It simply becomes part of the patina.
 

Ajgall

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Wait, we’re not supposed to use the grease hole or the patchbox? Oh no, what have I done…j/k
I use the grease hole or have a small tin I slip into my bag depending on the rifle. A few years ago my mother-in-law made some type of mystery salve to put on dry skin it’s awful lotion but very passable bullet lube.
 

smoothshooter

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So....
I have decided to try some Ballistol water mix at a 4:1 ratio per Grenadier's recc's (Thank you!)

I am going to carry it to the range in a plastic bottle.

This gets me thinking (always dangerous) We read about our backwoods hero's using a piece of greased cloth to load their PRB and I think we have discounted carrying grease in most original patch boxes due to there being no evidence of migration of the grease in to the wood on said originals.

How did they carry their lubes? David Cooke's hunting bag shows no grease container nor do the (very limited number) of other original bags I have seen.

What would be the HC/PC way of carrying lube while in the field? Any documentation that you are aware of would be welcomed.
I use an Altoids hinged lid box to carry pre-lubed and cut patches, and a few balls.
The lube is a mix of melted beeswax and olive oil. Mix ratio depends on shat time of year I am making them for, but generally it seems to work out to about 60% beeswax to 40% olive or some kind of cooking oil.
 
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