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Now why did I let this sit for 20 years????

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TexasAndy

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I'm trying to decide why I let this sit over a bookcase for 20 years without shooting it. Took it out Thursday for the first time and had so much fun shooting it. I don't think Pietta makes this anymore. Brass frame obviously, 61' style 5 1/2" bbl and in .36 caliber. I had to pound the heck out of the wedge to get it out but this one will definitely be coming with me to the range again.

pietta1.jpg
 

ord sgt

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Distractions happen. New toys are often set aside when something else grabs your attention. It may only be for a short time, until another new item catches your interest. But the smell of Sulphur and charcoal in the wind will draw you back to the sport.
 

Cowboy

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Most importantly she was always their waiting on you?

Now is time to make amends and show that beautiful pistol all the attention she deserves my friend.

I foresee many good times ahead for the both of you!

Enjoy.

Respectfully, Cowboy
 

wb78963

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If you think the wedge was hard to get out wait until you have to strip the frame for cleaning.
Get a good set of hollow ground gunsmith screwdrivers and good TOW nipple wrench.
Otherwise have fun shooting they are lots of fun.
Bunk
 

Zonie

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My information shows very little difference between the Griswold & Gunnison, and the Leech & Rigdon. Both of them usually had brass frames and round barrels ahead of the lug.

The Augusta Machine Works, and the Schneider & Glassick on the other hand usually had octagon barrels like the Colt revolvers. Some Augusta revolvers have 12 cylinder stops, 6 of them serving the purpose of holding the cylinder in a safe position.
 

sourdough

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My information shows very little difference between the Griswold & Gunnison, and the Leech & Rigdon. Both of them usually had brass frames and round barrels ahead of the lug.
The Leech & Rigdon never had a brass frame, and the Rigdon & Ansley 12-stop-slot revolvers all had steel frames. All had part round/part octagon barrels and smooth non-engraved cylinders.

The Augusta Machine Works, and the Schneider & Glassick on the other hand usually had octagon barrels like the Colt revolvers. Some Augusta revolvers have 12 cylinder stops, 6 of them serving the purpose of holding the cylinder in a safe position.
You are correct.

Regards,

Jim
 

sourdough

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Spiller & Burr
Leech & Rigdon
Griswold & Gunnison

how come it took Two guys to copy the original?
:dunno:
It fails to amaze me why a question like this is asked. None of the revolvers you specify were copies of original Colt 1851 Navy .36.

These were all Confederate manufactured revolvers. As such, due to the scarcity of materials and extant manufacturing facilities, Confederate business entities joined together to manufacture needed sidearms for the Confederate "cause".

The Spiller & Burr .36 was a brass-framed copy of the Union Whitney revolver and had no ties to the Colt 1851 Navy .36 in any way.

Pietta Spiller & Burr 001.jpg


The Leech & Rigdon had a steel frame like the Colt 1851 Navy .36 but had the easier/cheaper to produce part round/part octagon barrel and the smooth non-engraved cylinder.

Leech & Rigdon 001.JPG


The Griswold & Gunnison was the same with a brass frame. They manufactured over 3600 copies of it.

Regards,

Jim
 
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