NO YEAST at the store....

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Loyalist Dave

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OH GOOD GRIEF...,
Well there's no standard yeast at the store, so I'm going to have to use brewer's yeast.
Not a problem because I've done it before, but one has to "schedule" the dang stuff, as it takes about 12 hours to rise.
So you make the dough at 8 pm for a 6 am first "punch down" and a baking at 8 am the following morning.

The yeast on the shelf is just too old and won't proof, so, MY lack of attention to details......

LD
 

Eterry

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I thought i would never find AP Flour, i went to a half a dozen stores looking, finally found 10lbs today. They were also out of yeast... i'll have to get up at crack of dawn and try again.
 

Carbon 6

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OH GOOD GRIEF...,
Well there's no standard yeast at the store, so I'm going to have to use brewer's yeast.
Make a beer starter first, split the batch and refrigerate half for the next use.

I made waffles for supper, no yeast required.
 

Carbon 6

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OH GOOD GRIEF...,
Well there's no standard yeast at the store, so I'm going to have to use brewer's yeast.
Surely a man in your profession has a good relationship with a local doughnut shop or bakery. They buy that stuff in bulk. Surely you could talk them out of a couple grams. ;)

Btw, many breweries have a centrifuge for separating and recycling yeast. Another possible source. It would be like a return to the 18th century.

Do you have a bottle of home brew? that would be another source.

The stuff at the grocery store marked "brewers yeast" nutritional supplement" won't work.
 

sussexmuzllodr

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OH GOOD GRIEF...,
Well there's no standard yeast at the store, so I'm going to have to use brewer's yeast.
Not a problem because I've done it before, but one has to "schedule" the dang stuff, as it takes about 12 hours to rise.
So you make the dough at 8 pm for a 6 am first "punch down" and a baking at 8 am the following morning.

The yeast on the shelf is just too old and won't proof, so, MY lack of attention to details......

LD
PM me Dave I will send you the required yeast.....SM
 

Carbon 6

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I thought i would never find AP Flour,
If making bread, you can stretch that flour some by adding a cooked potato to the mix..
The starch rich water from boiled potatoes can also be added. let it cool first, don't put it in boiling hot.

Times like these my library full of old cook books comes in handy.
 

Eterry

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That reminds me of a sourdough starter.

Years ago, about 20 actually, my dad got me a batch of sourdough starter that had been made during WWII. I made several loaves and biscuits with it, then went on vacation and managed to kill it.
Maybe i should make another, and can say i made it during the 2020 pandemic.
 

Loyalist Dave

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Surely a man in your profession has a good relationship with a local doughnut shop or bakery. They buy that stuff in bulk. Surely you could talk them out of a couple grams. ;)
The SAD SAD part is that a great many of these places get their dough already made and proofed. They just unfreeze it, then allow it to rise and bake (or fry if doing donuts)

Btw, many breweries have a centrifuge for separating and recycling yeast. Another possible source. It would be like a return to the 18th century.
The local breweries aren't letting anybody near their facilities. They don't have many employees, and they don't want an outsider to contaminate a worker who the takes out the whole staff.

Do you have a bottle of home brew? that would be another source.
I have lots of different packets of brewing yeast, hence the reason I'm going to resort to it, and since I've used it in the past, I know about the 12 hour wait time for it to rise. It makes tasty bread for sure.

The stuff at the grocery store marked "brewers yeast" nutritional supplement" won't work.
Neither will the stuff sold in the pet aisle for one's dog, or at the pet store, labelled "brewer's yeast". ;)

Time to discover sourdough. Starting from scratch with a starter made from rye and whole wheat flour, you can have bread a few days .
AH well the trick there would be to find the rye flour.... 😶 Flour is pretty scarce in may area too....

I'm good with the ale yeast..., and in the past, sometimes it soured and I had a sour dough starter, but it doesn't always sour. When I lost my sour dough sponge, I tried to restore it with the same procedure....the yeast worked fine the second time but the sponge didn't sour. I used it every three days for about a month, and it never soured. So..., I wonder sometimes when archaeology folks assume that as bread was being baked every few days or as long as once a week, that it must have been sour dough.

LD
 

Tom A Hawk

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The SAD SAD part is that a great many of these places get their dough already made and proofed. They just unfreeze it, then allow it to rise and bake (or fry if doing donuts)



The local breweries aren't letting anybody near their facilities. They don't have many employees, and they don't want an outsider to contaminate a worker who the takes out the whole staff.


I have lots of different packets of brewing yeast, hence the reason I'm going to resort to it, and since I've used it in the past, I know about the 12 hour wait time for it to rise. It makes tasty bread for sure.


Neither will the stuff sold in the pet aisle for one's dog, or at the pet store, labelled "brewer's yeast". ;)



AH well the trick there would be to find the rye flour.... 😶 Flour is pretty scarce in may area too....

I'm good with the ale yeast..., and in the past, sometimes it soured and I had a sour dough starter, but it doesn't always sour. When I lost my sour dough sponge, I tried to restore it with the same procedure....the yeast worked fine the second time but the sponge didn't sour. I used it every three days for about a month, and it never soured. So..., I wonder sometimes when archaeology folks assume that as bread was being baked every few days or as long as once a week, that it must have been sour dough.

LD
No Rye, no problem. You can use grapes to get the starter going. Plunk a few in your sponge and the wild yeast on the skins will take it from there.
 

Nyckname

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Beer bread uses baking powder and a can of suds.

 

Carbon 6

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The SAD SAD part is that a great many of these places get their dough already made and proofed. They just unfreeze it, then allow it to rise and bake (or fry if doing donuts)
Oh don't I know it, it's so sad. Many people today don't know what real food is supposed to taste like.
 

Carbon 6

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I have lots of different packets of brewing yeast, hence the reason I'm going to resort to it, and since I've used it in the past, I know about the 12 hour wait time for it to rise. It makes tasty bread for sure.
You could make a low hop beer, after a week transfer to a secondary and then dry hop. Use the yeast from the primary fermentation to make bread. refrigerate the rest.
It might be some time before yeast becomes available again. A lot of bread yeast is imported. or they are made at the epicenters of the virus.

I wonder sometimes when archaeology folks assume that as bread was being baked every few days or as long as once a week, that it must have been sour dough.
It often wasn't sour unless they wanted it to be sour. There are a lot of factors that contribute to bread going sour. You already named one, the type of grain used. If they were using barm, from a brewer. it most likely wasn't sour.

No Rye, no problem. You can use grapes to get the starter going. Plunk a few in your sponge and the wild yeast on the skins will take it from there.
Fresh grape skins in April ?
 

Tom A Hawk

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You could make a low hop beer, after a week transfer to a secondary and then dry hop. Use the yeast from the primary fermentation to make bread. refrigerate the rest.
It might be some time before yeast becomes available again. A lot of bread yeast is imported. or they are made at the epicenters of the virus.



It often wasn't sour unless they wanted it to be sour. There are a lot of factors that contribute to bread going sour. You already named one, the type of grain used. If they were using barm, from a brewer. it most likely wasn't sour.



Fresh grape skins in April ?
Absolutely. They are fresh from Argentina.
 

Eterry

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I just remembered a book i have talking of making a yeast paste, then using a clean scraped board and painting the yeast on, after several layers have dried you scrape off a postage stamp sized piece to soak for making bread.

I'll see if i can dig it up.
 

Loyalist Dave

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A lot of bread yeast is imported. or they are made at the epicenters of the virus.
Holy crap, I didn't know a lot of the stuff was imported. Thanks.

No Rye, no problem. You can use grapes to get the starter going. Plunk a few in your sponge and the wild yeast on the skins will take it from there.
Fresh grape skins in April ?
Good to know, and true about grape skins unless they are flown in from...Argentina, but what about...RAISINS ? 🤔

So speaking of yeast..., I know of a site that's been trying to re-create an 18th century distilling operation. They are trying to use the local, wild yeast, and to culture a strain, as the brewers who then would distill the brew would've done by default after a few batches...the dominant strain would've become the majority of the yeast they were using as they transferred it from the finished barrel to the new barrel.

BUT..., they can't get the local strain to go to 8%, in fact they have a tough time (using some modern equipment to test and to cultivate) getting the "beer" to go anywhere near 8%. They know the two fellows who set up the distilling operation in their town came West, out of Lancaster PA, but neither of them wrote down any details as to how they did the fermenting portion of their distilling business. Maybe it was proprietary, or maybe they simply "knew" it as a common thing, and felt no need to write it down.

Last time I talked to the guys at the site, it was October of 2018, and I asked if they thought perhaps since raisins were known to have been available in the town, if the distillers might have used the yeast growing in the raisins. Sometimes it's a wine yeast, not a top fermenting ale yeast, and so might ferment out at a much higher ABV....

I suppose I should check back with them and see if they made progress...
🤔

LD
 
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