No Such Rifle !

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Yes Gents, there is no historical basis whatever for this flight of fancy, so, 'tongue in cheek' is the approach we'll be using. OK ? It's a rifle made here in the Hudson River Valley, 3rd or 4th qtr. 18c. A customer walks into an old Dutch gun builders shop with a rifle bbl. and wants a gun made using it. Our old Dutchman neither knows nor cares about nosecaps, patchboxes, cheeckpieces, etc. So, our customer gets a fowler with a rifle bbl. in it, in full Dutch style but way too short for our old Dutchman's taste. He's getting paid so he could care less. His customer got this and went away pleased (my gun and story so I can tell it any way I like). Now, there's a good half dozen or more things I'm not happy with at all so the 'critical eye' line forms right behind me. It's been a good 25 yrs. since I did a concept, to pattern, to finished gun. Have fun.
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'Neglected to mention that in the pics of the bottom of the rifle that piece of 'driftwood' is actually a hunk of old rotten pier from the Hudson. To it's left almost out of the one pic is a brick from Bannerman's Island Arsenal that sits in Newburgh bay. My hometown. Like I said, we have no 'rifle' legacy here so I'm pulling in any and all trinkets to lend credence to this completely unfounded project (chuckle) .
 

Notchy Bob

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I see nothing to criticize. The rifle is beautiful. I've never seen one quite like it, but there are a number of old guns out there that don't necessarily conform to recognized conventions.

Where did you find that triggerguard? I was somewhat interested in the Dutch-styled guns in South Africa a while back, and that square-backed triggerguard appeared to be a favorite with the old builders. I never did find a guard like that for sale anywhere, though.

Strong work!

Notchy Bob
 

Rudyard

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I agree with Brer Bob In any good Gunshop the customer is always right even if he's a complete Nong . ! non can say" It never happened'' maybe true with military pattern but even then 'Commercials' pop up to confound the pattern types . & The Poster is decidedly not a Nong Good on him .
Regards Rudyard .
 

Rudyard

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I see nothing to criticize. The rifle is beautiful. I've never seen one quite like it, but there are a number of old guns out there that don't necessarily conform to recognized conventions.

Where did you find that triggerguard? I was somewhat interested in the Dutch-styled guns in South Africa a while back, and that square-backed triggerguard appeared to be a favorite with the old builders. I never did find a guard like that for sale anywhere, though.

Strong work!

Notchy Bob
Into Cape Dutch muskets are you I studied every example I found in the museums while in SA . Though we sometimes derided the Boer as a' Hairy back' their historical doings in the hinterland make the Wild West look tame .
Regards Rudyard
 

stevenj4810

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That is very good carving on the stock. I can see what you mean, it is not a Lancaster rifle but not a true Fowler instead. I think Fowlers were smooth bore. What caliber is that masterpiece? It looks fantastic! Is that maple the type of wood?
 

dave_person

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Hi,
Very nice gun! Beautiful wood. If you look in Shumway's "Rifles in Colonial America vol. 2" , rifle 142 is very early and has strong Dutch influences. It is also shown in detail and color in Jim Mullins' "Of Sorts for Provincials". The famous Tileston rifle is possibly New England or New York made and may date to the 1770s. We also have 2 rifles by John Hills when he worked in Vermont after 1784. They have beautiful maple stocks and the Hills family worked in Goshen, CT close to NY and were clearly influenced by Hudson River gun making. In addition, there was a large German population that moved into the Mohawk River Valley. It would be strange if they had no rifle culture at all.

dave
 

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