No "charcloth" Flint & Steel Fire Lighting.

Discussion in 'Trekking' started by Le Loup, Nov 23, 2018.

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  1. Jan 4, 2019 #21

    Le Loup

    Le Loup

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    What is it Tom?
    Keith.
     
  2. Jan 4, 2019 #22

    Tom A Hawk

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    Well... its better if I show you rather than try to explain it. I learned about this method at a knap-in a couple of summers ago.
     
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  3. Jan 5, 2019 #23

    Cruzatte

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    What a surprise! Cool.:thumbs up:
     
  4. Jan 6, 2019 #24

    Newtire

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    Great idea. Makes me wonder how someone came up with that!
     
  5. Jan 6, 2019 #25

    attuco

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    It's called a Rudiger roll. Named after a WWII German who was held a LOW and first wrote it down as a method they used in prison. YouTube has a lot of videos. It's the easiest friction method of starting a fire.
     
  6. Jan 7, 2019 #26

    Tom A Hawk

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    Correct. I read the POW's used it to light their smokes.
     
  7. Jan 7, 2019 #27

    Two Feathers

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    I've never seen anything like that, amazing!!! I wonder if ground up charcoal would work? Basically same composition? Cool, keep 'em comin.'
    Two Feathers
     
  8. Jan 8, 2019 #28

    Ringo

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    Thank you for sharing that. I had never heard of that method.
     
  9. Jan 8, 2019 #29

    attuco

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    There is another method that is way cool also, it's called a fire piston it's a 4 or 5 inch long, about 1\2 inch diameter tube with one enclosed and fitted with an air tight piston.
    A piece of char cloth is attached to the piston and it is slammed into the tube. The pressure rises enough to ignite the char cloth. Works just like a diesel engine. The method came to the attention of the Navy during WWII in the Philippines.
     
  10. Jan 10, 2019 #30

    Tom A Hawk

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    Also called a "fire syringe", they were patented in England in 1800 and therefore period correct for reenactors. While there are modern versions available today the primitive designs were made in wood and buffalo horn and utilized a plant fiber gasket wrapped around the piston to achieve the air tight seal and compression. Rumor has it that such a device was included in the inventory of Louis and Clark's Corp of Discovery.
     
  11. Jan 10, 2019 #31

    Black Hand

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    Let's remember that "patented in England in 1800" doesn't necessarily translate to "used in the Colonies". I'd appreciate any documentation that confirms their presence here...
     
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  12. Jan 10, 2019 #32

    Le Loup

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    [​IMG]
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  13. Jan 11, 2019 at 12:17 PM #33

    Shawnee Mike

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    The Friction roll is pretty Kewl. Ive not seen that before. I wonder if there is a natural alternative to the cotton ball. Any thoughts ?
     
  14. Jan 11, 2019 at 7:00 PM #34

    Nativearizonan

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    I watched a few vids on youtube, and they seem to be making suitable fire rolls out of strong natural fibers like yucca. It seems to be a matter of whether or not the fiber is strong enough to hold up to the rolling action involved in making enough friction to create an ember.
     
  15. Jan 12, 2019 at 1:59 PM #35

    Flint62Smoothie

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    Neat method, will have to try it for myself!
     
  16. Jan 12, 2019 at 5:01 PM #36

    Shawnee Mike

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    Thanks for the Thoughts NA. Yucca a bit skeerce out this way. But perhaps something like it. Thanks for the idea.
     
  17. Jan 12, 2019 at 5:04 PM #37

    Black Hand

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    Check in front of your local Taco Bell - they seem to use Yucca in the decorative planters out front.
     
  18. Jan 12, 2019 at 5:58 PM #38

    Tb54

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    I seen guys ignite uncharred cloth with a ferro rod by permeating the material first with wood ash. I think one of the cloths was terrycloth. They rubbed it into the material such that had I done that to my cloths, mom woulda tanned my hyde.
     
  19. Jan 13, 2019 at 12:41 AM #39

    Logcutter

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    To catch a spark from a flint and steel chaga, especially dry chaga works very well. I have dropped a spark on a large piece of chaga and held it for hours. I think if you had enough or a big enough piece of dry chaga you could hold it for days. Ancient man used it to transport fire. And another plus is that you can make a nutritious tasty tea out of chaga as well.
     
  20. Jan 13, 2019 at 1:33 AM #40

    Tom A Hawk

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    Thanks for bringing this up Logcutter. Chaga, aka Tinder Fungus, is my favorite tinder and I was just thinking of creating a separate post on this alone. It doesn't grow very far south and I suspect the members in other areas may not be familiar with it. In NYS I have found it almost down to the PA border and the Adirondack region and southern Canada is full of it. This tinder works well with just about every fire making method. It catches a spark very easily and it can be used as a hearth board with friction methods.

    Winter is a great time to go hunting for tinder fungus as it stands out well against white snow. Look for a black cone shaped mass on birch trees. Chaga tea is reputed to have medicinal anti-tumor properties, The smoke has a nice incense like aroma and also serves as an insect repellent.

    The best quality will be buckskin color and spongy feeling. If hard and woody, grind into powder for flint and steel.

    Coal established by hand drill
    upload_2019-1-12_20-24-32.png

    What to look for
    upload_2019-1-12_20-29-30.png
     

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