No "charcloth" Flint & Steel Fire Lighting.

Discussion in 'Trekking' started by Le Loup, Nov 23, 2018.

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  1. Nov 23, 2018 #1

    Le Loup

    Le Loup

    Le Loup

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  2. Nov 30, 2018 #2

    Shawnee Mike

    Shawnee Mike

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    I have used charred punkwood. Works well.
     
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  3. Nov 30, 2018 #3

    Le Loup

    Le Loup

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    Yes it does Mike & there is usually plenty of it around once you know what you are looking for.
    Keith.
     
  4. Nov 30, 2018 #4

    Pukka Bundook

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    If you can find the proper touchwood, (a fungus)it will hold a spark without charring.
    Here we have more horeshoe fungus than proper stuff, so of course char that.
    For a matchlock, this can be used without charring. (Not that this is pertinent to this thread!)
     
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  5. Nov 30, 2018 #5

    Le Loup

    Le Loup

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    Yes Pukka, we have a wildfire here that will catch a spark without charring, but all plant & fungus tinders are proper touchwood/wildfire.
    Keith.
     
  6. Dec 1, 2018 #6

    Johnny Tremain

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    Up here is the great wet pacific north woods they have stuff called fatwood. I have a 6 inch by 1 inch stick tired to my bag always.
    Different to tender you have to keep dry. Fatwood works even when wet. Not as well as when dry, put in a pinch you have it.
    You Tube is the place to learn all about it.
     
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  7. Dec 1, 2018 #7

    Le Loup

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    The original name Johnny was candlewood, it is a kindling, not a tinder although since the production of the Ferocerium Rod which is manufactured flint, that is called steel by those that don't know any better, then what was once & still is to traditional people kindling is now known as tinder. You can't light kindling with a REAL flint, steel & tinderbox. This changing of materials & names has become very confusing for newbies, & at times is confusing for traditional fire masters but I guess we are getting used to it now & know that when someone says they can light candlewood with a flint & steel, we know they are using a ferocerium rod.
    Keith.
     
  8. Dec 1, 2018 #8

    Crewdawg445

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    The forest always will provide! One just need know were to look!
     
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  9. Dec 1, 2018 #9

    N.Y. Yankee

    N.Y. Yankee

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    Any natural material will work for char. Punk wood, dry horse-hoof fungus, natural rope, and cotton lantirn wicking all work well. My favorite is an old pair of blue jeans. It makes many years supply of char cloth. I once gave someone an old denim jacket for char and he cut and charred several cans of cloth from it.
     
  10. Dec 1, 2018 #10

    Le Loup

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    Agreed Cd.
    Keith.
     
  11. Dec 2, 2018 #11

    drobs

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    I like Cedar (juniper) Bark for tinder. Pull it off a tree and rolled it in your hands. Great for catching a spark.
     
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  12. Dec 4, 2018 #12

    jrmflintlock

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    Le Loup, Great video! I use charred punkwood, which I char in a tin like you mentioned. You call the material in your tinder box "tinder"? is it Charred? or is it naturally like that? I really liked your method of leaving the "Char" in the can for reuse! I usually take a piece out and wrap it in my "birds nest" but then its lost.

    Thanks for sharing!!
     
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  13. Dec 4, 2018 #13

    jrmflintlock

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    Well La Loup, I found another video you did on making the tinder in the fire without the little tin oven. Thanks!! I'll have to try it!!
     
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  14. Dec 5, 2018 #14

    Le Loup

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    I like to use original terms as much as possible, with modern gadgets & new term it can get confusing. Char is a term used when you char something in the fire so it is charred. Tow rag was charred in homes to make tinder, so charring plant & fungus does the same thing. So what I have in my tinderbox is charred punkwood (also known as spunge, touchwood & wildfire) & charred fungus charred directly in the fire & smothered in my tinderbox. This was one of the original methods of preparing plants, fungus & tow rag as tinder.
    Keith.
     
  15. Dec 5, 2018 #15

    Le Loup

    Le Loup

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    That is the way it was done originally jrm.
    Keith.
    "We might make tinder by burning: some linen rag, and putting it in & close box: but we have unfortunately none to spare and therefore, the best thing for us would be to find ... Johann David Wyss, Johann Rudolf Wyss - 1818

    "Shall I instruct you in the practical science of getting a light with flint and steel? The first thing is to make your tinder, by burning or rather scorching a piece of rag. Toast it or char it till it is tenderly made into tinder. Neither do it too little, nor too much; cook your rags to a turn. Be very mindful to keep your tinder dry as a bone; for a spark will be of no service if it does not fall where it will be nourished; and the least damp will kill it. The sparks of temptation would be harmless if it were not for the tinder of corruption in our hearts. Good teaching is also lost unless it falls upon a mind prepared to receive it: so that the metaphor can be used either way.
    Having secured your tinder, you had next to know how to strike your flint and steel so as to create sparks. Many a knock of the fingers would you get if you did not look alive. Possibly you would also bark your knuckles if you did know the art, if the weather was cold and your hands were half frozen. So is it in your dealing with men's consciences: you may give a hard knock and fetch fire out of them, or you may break your own knuckles by bringing upon yourself personal ill-will.
    If you were so skilful or so fortunate as to cause a spark to drop into the tinder, you had to blow upon it very gently; just as the first sign of grace in any heart needs encouraging with the fostering breath of sympathy. How often have I seen a servant go down on her knees to blow at a coal which seemed to have a little life in it! Let us do the like with those persons concerning whom we are somewhat hopeful.
    When the spark had become fairly prosperous in the tinder, then you applied the point of your brimstone match. You do not quite know what I mean. Well, mind you do not make a brimstone match when you get married. The brimstone, at the sharpened point of the match, would take fire when it touched the spark, and then your labour approached its reward. When you had your match flaming, and smelling, you lighted your candle; and having done with your elaborate apparatus, you popped the flat lid of the box upon the tinder to put it all out".

    http://www.spurgeon.org/misc/candles2.htm


     
  16. Dec 6, 2018 #16

    Spence10

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    You might enjoy this, Keith. Excuse the long title, they talked funny in those days.;)

    Tartaglia, Niccoláo, d. 1557.
    Three bookes of colloquies concerning the arte of shooting in great and small peeces of artillerie, variable randges, measure, and waight of leaden, yron, and marble stone pellets, minerall saltepeeter, gunpowder of diuers sortes, and the cause why some sortes of gunpower are corned, and some sortes of gunpowder are not corned: written in Italian, and dedicated by Nicholas Tartaglia vnto the Royall Prince of most famous memorie Henrie the eight, late King of England, Fraunce, and Ireland, defender of the faith &c. And now translated into English by Cyprian Lucar Gent. who hath also augmented the volume of the saide colloquies with the contents of euery colloquie, and with all the corollaries and tables, that are in the same volume. Also the said Cyprian Lucar hath annexed vnto the same three books of colloquies a treatise named Lucar Appendix …

    The 20 Chapter. [of the Appendix]

    "To make touchwood and tinder for a Gunners Tinder boxe

    "Take those great things which are called olde Todestooles growing at the bottoms of nut trees, beechtrees, okes, and such other like trees, drye them with the smoke of fire, & cut them into so many peeces as you will, and having well beaten them, boyle them in strong lie with waule floure, or saltpeeter, till all the lie shall be consumed.

    "After this laying them in a heape uppon a boorde, drie them in an oven which must not be made verie hotte, and after you have so done, beate them well with a wooden mallet, and when you shall have cause to use any parte of those Todestooles (now by the meanes above declared made touchwood) rubbe well that parte betweene your handes for to make it sofe and apte to take fire. But when you will make tinder for a Gunners tinder boxe, take pieces of fustian, or of olde and fine linnen clothe, make them to burn and flame in a fire, & suddenly before the flame which is in the cloth die, choke their fire, & keep their tinder so made in a box lined with clothe, to the end it may not be moyste at any time."

    http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A13381.0001.001

    Spence
     
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  17. Dec 6, 2018 #17

    Le Loup

    Le Loup

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    Many thanks Spence, very much appreciated. The first quote would be about Amadou, & I did know that Gunners used cloth, but it is great to find another documented quote. Well done mate.
    Regards, Keith.
     
  18. Dec 6, 2018 #18

    Spence10

    Spence10

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    Keith, are you interested in a report on the scholarly analysis of the fire making kit of Ötzi, aka The Ice Man, the 5,000-year-old copper age man found in the Italian alps?

    Spence
     
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  19. Dec 6, 2018 #19

    Le Loup

    Le Loup

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    I already have it Spence, but I appreciate you thinking of me.
    Thank you.
    Regards, Keith.
     

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