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New Gonne Project

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coehornboy

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So...I show Claypipes videos (can't remember or find the original post - help!!) to my buddy, who is a armorer for a local PD. He shoots cannons, but never has been into BP rifle or pistol...

HOWEVER, when he gets a look at the vids, he gets all worked up :hmm: . Here's a look at the finished project:



The bore is .75, with a 5/8 dia. chamber. The length of the bore is 6" and the overrall length is 11"

Here it is with the tiller:



The finish on the barrel is "black zinc." Over time, with UV exposure, it turns to a grey-green color.



The half-turned barrel in the background will be used for a "hackenbuch."

Next, I'll take shots of the proofing and firing. :v
 

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Quite cute, as well as functional with the mace like muzzle treatment. .75 caliber, not too shabby. In my video's I'm shooting .995 round balls out of Zeus, my 4-bore

Zeus Speaks
Zeus Again.

Now, see my newest piece, turned by Powder Keg, Thanks Wes!

Meet the Kracken!



12" OA, 1.5"x6" bore, 1"x2.5" powder chamber

 

spitfire

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Could it be a 1 gauge! :) You gotta luv it!I can't wait for the proof test video!Gee,I would just be satisfied with a 4 gauge.But the concept of a 1# rb sounds interesting. :thumbsup:
 

coehornboy

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Claypipe: What size charge do you plan to use? Does the excess room in the powder chamber cause a problem with ignition??

Thanks :v
 

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spitfire said:
Could it be a 1 gauge! :) You gotta luv it!I can't wait for the proof test video!Gee,I would just be satisfied with a 4 gauge.But the concept of a 1# rb sounds interesting. :thumbsup:
That may take a while, :cursing: I live in Massachusetts and it takes a permit with a good reason for the discharge of artillery pieces. My next big project will be a Medieval style breech loading cannon with a pair of thunder mugs. But that may be awhile as well, Jeep needs repairs.

CP
 

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spitfire said:
Nice work and looks very combative! :winking:
These types of handgonnes were the grandfathers to the more modern Coehorn Mortars.

The design is mine, based loosely on several medieval pieces. I made the muzzle ring more cannon like.

Here's a nice profile:



CP
 

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coehornboy said:
Claypipe: What size charge do you plan to use? Does the excess room in the powder chamber cause a problem with ignition??

Thanks :v
Well, the powder chamber is 2.5" x 1.0". Each .5" is roughly 100 grains of powder by volume. So I can do a 500 grain charge, no problem.

The following is a theory that I am experimenting with, and should not be considered a common or a safe practice of handgonne shooting. Only certain designs can be considered for this practice, thin walled handgonnes MUST NOT attempt to use this sort of loading.

I have been working on the theory, based on observation of many different handgonnes, that many of the early handgonnes were designed to make use of the extreme pressures that result from what is commonly termed detonation or flashover. This is an extremely dangerous event in modern cartridge guns. It can be destructive, and definitely dangerous, event when it occurs in modern firearms. However, if you look at the way gonnes like the Tannenberg Gonne and the Tabor Píštala are constructed, you will see that the powder chamber, the combustion area of the gonne, is reinforced. I believe this was done to take advantage of the high pressures that detonation offers, as well as to conserve powder, an expensive commodity. If you go to my profile, you'll find a link to my handgonne site, check out the videos I did when testing the Tannenberg Gonne.

CP
 

hawkchucker

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Clay pipe dont wes make the pretyest stuff?

I will definatly have to post picks of mine now.

As For the cannon Let me know we can take it to my work and shoot ot 200 acres and the police dont mind!
 

marmot

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Claypipe - you're probably aware of this already, but just in case... there is some discussion concerning early gonnes and their use of serpentine powder (ie, mechanically mixed without out being wetted) as opposed to a more homogenous wetted mixture (black powder as we know it)... the two have different burning characteristics, which could explain some of the interior designs of the early gonnes... :hmm:
Now a little figuring... flashover with modern BP usually equals higher pressure... flashover with serpentine might have simply been more reliable in getting enough presure to send the projectile downrange, without a high pressure spike like we see in modern BP...
Don't know... just thinkin' on it... trying to make my college chemistry course good for something after all these years...

M
 

spitfire

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I was going to recommend that Link!Good research! :thumbsup:
 
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