Need recommendation on getting my first flintlock

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dew9lei

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Just had to ask when I noticed you were a forum member less than a month. The main struggle I have seen some folks have with flintlocks is the flash a few inches in front of their face. Sometimes it takes a while to work through it. Good luck in your search, currently somewhat limited availability and inflated prices, but be patient and you will find what you want. It can be addicting.
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Oh I won't be having any problem with that.
 
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Do you guys have a "go-to" website for ordering a Charleville? How much am I looking at for one in brand new condition?
Well, you are making me change. But a new replica Charleville from Pedersoli as sold by Dixie Gun Works is out of your target budget.

Dixie Gun Works has a couple of the Pedersoli Pennsylvania Rifles that are nearly in the target budget. It's very plain and has an adjustable rear sight that could be changed for a fixed sight. If one squints in the proper lighting conditions, it will pass for an AWI era rifle.

The same thing can be said for the Pedersoli Kentucky Rifle, which is in your budget but unfortunately, it's not available.
 
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You can also look at the Pedersoli rifles offered by Midway USA. They have the Pedersoli Frontier Rifle in mixed availability. The Barrel is 38" which is a bit short.
 
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In fact I'm open to either.

I was looking at it too. Does the stock require any sort of woodworking other than painting it with perhaps wood stains and truoil (or tung oil) if not then I'm all good to go! Thank you sir!
A tiny bit of inletting of the wood to get some of the parts to fit. Most just fit as delivered. There may be some smoothing of the stock and sanding/polishing of the metal parts to remove any machine marks. The wood is to be stained, not painted although this is most likely a slip of the tongue rather than a description of technique. I don't think any drilling is required but that would need to be confirmed.

Do look at Jim Kibler's videos to see just how much work is involved.
 

dew9lei

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A tiny bit of inletting of the wood to get some of the parts to fit. Most just fit as delivered. There may be some smoothing of the stock and sanding/polishing of the metal parts to remove any machine marks. The wood is to be stained, not painted although this is most likely a slip of the tongue rather than a description of technique. I don't think any drilling is required but that would need to be confirmed.

Do look at Jim Kibler's videos to see just how much work is involved.
Yes sir "stain" is the right wording. i've refinished a couple of mosin nagants, a Chinese SKS and a M44 so I should be ok with that. Thx!!
 

dew9lei

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Rock Home Isle

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I am looking for a repro of a flintlock rifle during the American revolution war era. Something in full length (40+" barrel length) and 50+ cal. Can you pros give me some recommendations? It'll be my first flintlock rifle.

Budget is $1000 (or less) I'm open to DIY kits (less expensive) Thank you!!

Added: I'll be only punching paper with it.
Add about $400 to $500 and a good quality Flintlock becomes very doable…
 

JackP

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My first flintlock is a Jacob Dickert that I built myself. As much as I love it, if I had it to do over my choice would the one I'm building now Which is a Fusil de Chasse smooth bore. If you want a rifle build that. But don't overlook the smooth bores, they are more fun for my old eyes.

Jack
 

Daveboone

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The Kibler Colonial is well researched and designed to be typical of a Pennsylvania rifle of the 1760-1780 time perioed (per his website). As such, it would be a very typical generic rifle of the revolutionary war era. Otherwise, probably the most common long arm would be a Brown Bess design.
Kiblers kits are designed for minimal skill...just needs patience. Very basic hand tools are required, which you can find on his website. Final fitting (which can be fussy and time consuming) only is required, with all predrilling etc. done (except for drilling the barrel pin holes...easy as the wood holes are predrilled).
You will read where some folks are able to assemble a Kibler in five hours.....hmmmm....
Most of us plan it as a winters project.
For the money...which is above your target, you are getting probably the best overall rifle /flintlock possible.
There is a lot of love for Kiblers here, for a good reason.
 
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Based on the Kibler website, they have what is called an American Longrifle in multiple calibers, starting at .50 cal and going up in both rifled and smoothbore. The Maple and Cherry stocked versions are $830 + $300, not bad at all. It goes up when you get into Fancy Maple, Extra Fancy and Walnut but the styling is the same as many of the colonies in the 1760s and 1770s, so it might be the ticket. This is the one I am looking at myself, although I am personally leaning toward the Fancy Maple. I do not do reenacting but I would think it would be darn close if you ever went in that direction. Based on the copious posts I have read on this site about Kiblers I think if you were to take the plunge then there are MANY here who would gladly help you through the assembly and finishing process, I know when I do it I will surely call on the brain trust for assistance :thumb:
 
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Probably the Kibler Colonial rifle would be the closest to a type of rifle used in the American War of Independence (AWI). There is no one specific rifle used. Any of them could come from many different schools of construction. If you have any wood working skills, then extend your budget to about $1,350 to afford the Kibler Colonial Rifle kit in 54 or 58 caliber (for weight reduction).

I have Martini and Trapdoors, had a Swiss Vetterli and Mauser 1871 over the years; only shot the Trap live, others were never shot. You're on a good path!
Ha! I know this is a Traditional ML forum, but I have to say, r.
e: the Martini Henry's... Sounds like I'm not the only one who was permanently marked from watching the movie "ZULU!" decades ago...

" Men of Harlecht, stand ye dreaming, can't you see their spearpoints gleaming..."
 

Rock Home Isle

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Ha! I know this is a Traditional ML forum, but I have to say, r.
e: the Martini Henry's... Sounds like I'm not the only one who was permanently marked from watching the movie "ZULU!" decades ago...

" Men of Harlecht, stand ye dreaming, can't you see their spearpoints gleaming..."
Micheal Caine’s acting debut…I watch it at least once a year….Well I watch “Zulu Dawn“ 1st…then “Zulu“…
 

JBird

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For someone who doesn't have experience with hand tools, the hardest part on a Kibler would be finishing out the brass castings which already come very refined when compared to the other kits on the market. worst case scenario a few areas on the rifle aren't perfect, you can live with it and enjoy the rifle or order replacement castings from Kibler.

There is little you can do to ruin the wood unless your careless, it needs very little to be ready for whatever method of staining you decide suits your needs. No shaping should be needed, at most the corners of a few inlets may need a few slivers of wood removed with a small chisel.

Even if you make mistakes, you'll still be ahead of the game when compared to production rifles in the same price range with the quality of the parts and the historicity. Jims videos on building the Colonial are a great watch if you have any interest. Keep in mind that Jim is a custom rifle builder and has all the hand tools and fancy vices that are not truly necessary for one of these kits. Many people have built these on their kitchen table.

 
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Dixie is a great company ; both their Perdersoli Charleyvilles (good guys) and Besses (redcoats) are over 1600$
The few I’ve seen are good quality, but all new muzzleloaders need tweaking.
You’ll notice no one here wants you to buy a “cheap” flinter, because they all know there are few things in life more frustrating than a cheap flintlock lock
(with the possible exception of golf).
Seems to me the closest rifle to your budget is a Kibler Colonial.
There’s some work involved but very little and there’s tons of help from Jim and others on YouTube and here.
As a bonus you get a top quality lock that is as good or better than the very best locks made today, and you won’t have to learn how to harden a frizzen, like you do with most of the imported locks.
If you’re in So Cal swing by Burbank Muzzleloaders, you can try some flinters, we shoot black powder anything… even cannons!
 

Rock Home Isle

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Dixie is a great company ; both their Perdersoli Charleyvilles (good guys) and Besses (redcoats) are over 1600$
The few I’ve seen are good quality, but all new muzzleloaders need tweaking.
You’ll notice no one here wants you to buy a “cheap” flinter, because they all know there are few things in life more frustrating than a cheap flintlock lock
(with the possible exception of golf).
Seems to me the closest rifle to your budget is a Kibler Colonial.
There’s some work involved but very little and there’s tons of help from Jim and others on YouTube and here.
As a bonus you get a top quality lock that is as good or better than the very best locks made today, and you won’t have to learn how to harden a frizzen, like you do with most of the imported locks.
If you’re in So Cal swing by Burbank Muzzleloaders, you can try some flinters, we shoot black powder anything… even cannons!
I have a Pedersoli Brown Bess Carbine, love that gun. Someday I’ll get a full sized Bess & a Charleville…someday.
 

manbat

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Long time cartridge shooter and reloader here. I was faced with the same want for a revolutionary war era replica, no experience shooting a flintlock, lots of questions, and communicated concerns and advice from friendly sources. I bought a Pedersoli Brown Bess and the basics needed to shoot it for the first time and never looked back. My BB fired on the first shot I took and every shot afterward. A deal on a used Pedersoli Bess can be found to get closer to your budget goal- I've seen multiple sales posted in this forum as examples.
 

manbat

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Long time cartridge shooter and reloader here. I was faced with the same want for a revolutionary war era replica, no experience shooting a flintlock, lots of questions, and communicated concerns and advice from friendly sources. I spent the extra and bought a Pedersoli Brown Bess and the basics needed to shoot it for the first time and never looked back. My BB fired on the first shot I took and every shot afterward. A deal on a used Pedersoli Bess can be found to get closer to your budget goal- I've seen multiple sales posted in this forum as examples.
 
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