My new Whitworth and Volunteer molds

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In anticipation of working up some loads for my PH Whitworth and Volunteer I finally decided on some molds to try. Both molds are supposed to cast a .442 in pure lead for paper patching with vintage .002 onion skin paper. The cylindrical mold should cast a 500 grain, 530 grain, and 550 grain bullet but I won't know that until I have a chance to cast some and test them. The same goes for the hexagonal mold but I'm not sure of the grain weight until I cast a few of them as well. The upside is that I can use both the cylindrical and hexagonal in the Whitworth and I will have an assortment of weights to test in the Volunteer with the cylindrical mold. I also had Tom at Accurate make 2 different nose styles on the cylindrical mold to see what if any difference there is. My guess is that it won't change anything but I like to tinker so it should View attachment 141130 View attachment 141131 View attachment 141132 View attachment 141133 be interesting to see what happens. View attachment 141130 View attachment 141131 View attachment 141132 View attachment 141133
very nice. Let us know how it all works out.
 

Cpt Flint

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🤣 Funny!

Apparently it's OK for you to use your trick "Brooks Custom mold for my BPCR .45-70" in a muzzle loading rifle, but not so for someone seeking to use a bullet of the form originally used in the Whitworth rifle... Surely the use of a hexagonal bullet for the Whitworth rifle is part of its allure and in keeping with traditional muzzle loading, which this forum promotes.

Similarly paper patched bullets are traditional and still widely used today in both long range muzzle loading and black powder cartridge rifle. They're easy and quick to prepare and no messing around with lube. Why are they discredited? Worked fine for me just over two weeks ago when I won a 900 yard muzzle loading rifle match.

The Whitworth in the 19thC used both hexagonal and cylindrical paper patched bullets to good effect. Seeking to replicate that is part of the joys of traditional muzzle loading.

David
Mr Minshall, far be it from me to disagree with you at all on the subject of Whitworth rifles. I defer to your superior knowledge. I simply enjoyed going straight to an incredibly accurate combination that was on hand without spending any more money. I have your books and consider them to be the last word.
I also happen to believe that the Brooks bullet is superior to any and all other appropriate Whitworth projectiles at 500 yards. Nostalgic originality is one thing. Ballistic superiority is quite another.
 

ResearchPress

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Mr Minshall, far be it from me to disagree with you at all on the subject of Whitworth rifles. I defer to your superior knowledge. I simply enjoyed going straight to an incredibly accurate combination that was on hand without spending any more money. I have your books and consider them to be the last word.
I also happen to believe that the Brooks bullet is superior to any and all other appropriate Whitworth projectiles at 500 yards. Nostalgic originality is one thing. Ballistic superiority is quite another.
Oh I'm not disagreeing with your choice of bullet - use what works for your purposes and gives you your desired results. Unfortunately though, your disparaging original post failed to share your enjoyment with what you have achieved. It just came across as derogatory rather than encouraging.

The most successful / consistent shooting I have seen with Whitworth rifles is with a cylindrical paper patched bullet with hollow base. I seldom see grease groove bullets used in long range muzzle loading and none demonstrating consistent superiority over paper patched bullets - they are far from "discredited".

David
 

TFoley

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Are you sure of that I believe your in error sold the Jersey lads guns RFD to RFD.at Bisley Rudyard

The Channel Islands (Norman: Îles d'la Manche; French: îles Anglo-Normandes or îles de la Manche)] are an archipelago in the English Channel, off the French coast of Normandy. They include two Crown Dependencies: the Bailiwick of Jersey, which is the largest of the islands; and the Bailiwick of Guernsey, consisting of Guernsey, Alderney, Sark, Herm and some smaller islands. They are considered the remnants of the Duchy of Normandy and, although they are not part of the United Kingdom,[3] the UK is responsible for the defence and international relations of the islands.[4] The Crown dependencies are not members of the Commonwealth of Nations, nor have they ever been in the European Union. They have a total population of about 170,499, and the bailiwicks' capitals, Saint Helier and Saint Peter Port, have populations of 33,500 and 18,207, respectively.
 

TFoley

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The Channel Islands are British territory and were the only part of Britain occupied by the Germans in WW2 , Channel Islanders are British citizens .

The Channel Islands (Norman: Îles d'la Manche; French: îles Anglo-Normandes or îles de la Manche)[note 1] are an archipelago in the English Channel, off the French coast of Normandy. They include two Crown Dependencies: the Bailiwick of Jersey, which is the largest of the islands; and the Bailiwick of Guernsey, consisting of Guernsey, Alderney, Sark, Herm and some smaller islands. They are considered the remnants of the Duchy of Normandy and, although they are not part of the United Kingdom,[3] the UK is responsible for the defence and international relations of the islands.[4] The Crown dependencies are not members of the Commonwealth of Nations, nor have they ever been in the European Union. They have a total population of about 170,499, and the bailiwicks' capitals, Saint Helier and Saint Peter Port, have populations of 33,500 and 18,207, respectively.

Islanders are full British citizens, but were not classed as European citizens unless by descent from a UK national. Any British citizen who applies for a passport in Jersey or Guernsey receives a passport bearing the words "British Islands, Bailiwick of Jersey" or "British Islands, Bailiwick of Guernsey".

Our resident Jerseyite claims, quite rightly, that as William the Conqueror was actually Duke of Normandy BEFORE the invasion of England in 1066, that England is also actually part of the remnants of the Duchy of Normandy, and that the Channel Islands therefore have Precedence in governmental terms over the rest of the present-day UK.
 
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Cpt Flint

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Oh I'm not disagreeing with your choice of bullet - use what works for your purposes and gives you your desired results. Unfortunately though, your disparaging original post failed to share your enjoyment with what you have achieved. It just came across as derogatory rather than encouraging.

The most successful / consistent shooting I have seen with Whitworth rifles is with a cylindrical paper patched bullet with hollow base. I seldom see grease groove bullets used in long range muzzle loading and none demonstrating consistent superiority over paper patched bullets - they are far from "discredited".

David
Mr Minshall, I freely confess that I am prejudiced against paper patching. My apologies to any and all that I might have offended. I’m an old BPCR shooter who sought the simplest way to win. Thank you for your continued efforts to educate us on Whitworth rifles.
 

ResearchPress

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. . . I’m an old BPCR shooter who sought the simplest way to win. Thank you for your continued efforts to educate us on Whitworth rifles.
All's good with me. Paper patched bullets with my long range match rifles I find simple and effective (win matches when I do my bit), and these matches have time for the necessary cleaning between shots. I'm not pushing any agenda though - it's for the individual to work things for themselves. I have a great historical interest in Whitworth, but shoot mine infrequently. BPCR this year I've been working through the ranges with a 45-90 and grease groove bullet. I've got sight settings now for 300, 500, 600 and 1000 yards - will have chance to shoot at 900 in a couple of week.

David
 

TFoley

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Mr Minshall, I freely confess that I am prejudiced against paper patching. My apologies to any and all that I might have offended. I’m an old BPCR shooter who sought the simplest way to win. Thank you for your continued efforts to educate us on Whitworth rifles.

Ever read any of Idaho Lewis' exploits with pp bullets? Asking for a friend.
 

ResearchPress

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What rifle?
Gibbs-Metford for long range muzzle loading, Pedersoli Gibbs also. Both with paper patched bullets - later this year we have an aggregate match comprising 15 shots at each distance, 1000, 1100 & 1200 yards. BPCR 45-90 is a Browning 1885 High Wall.

David
 
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