Muzzle Loading Guns, 1970's and 1980's

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Thanks for all the informative responses. So, others have noticed this too. I guess the sell-off is due to many of the reasons mentioned above. I remember during the 70's when the Hawken and Tennessee styled rifles were all the rage. Even custom guns from that period are selling for considerably more than they cost to build during that time. While us BP/ML shooters/collectors are still a minority compared to the entire shooting sports hobby, the prices realized for second hand guns (especially custom built) shows there is still a viable market. So this brings me to my question in about 2-3 years from now. I'm a widower with two daughters, granddaughters, son-in-laws, etc. with no interest in any of these guns, period. And I have always had a difficult time letting anything go from my collection. But not owning the fountain of youth, I will inevitably have to do something. So, with no heirs apparent, is it better to sell off 2-3 items a year ? Or just keep enjoying all and going to one big auction sometime down the road ? And just keeping the half-dozen or so that I plan on shooting on a regular basis.

Rick
 
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IMHO, the cool stuff that has floated my boat for all these many years IS JUST STUFF! Although I know I cannot take it with me, when I'm gone, I will truly not care anymore.

So......mine as well just keep on enjoying it all till that day comes! :p
I am coming to a similar conclusion. Rather than fret & worry about what happens to my stuff when i am gone, just enjoy it whether you shoot it or not! After all, when I am gone I am gone, won't really matter at that point whether it goes to a pawn shop, the NRA, or sold at auction.
 

Captjoel

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I am coming to a similar conclusion. Rather than fret & worry about what happens to my stuff when i am gone, just enjoy it whether you shoot it or not! After all, when I am gone I am gone, won't really matter at that point whether it goes to a pawn shop, the NRA, or sold at auction.
Just think, you sell, give away, get rid of your most prized possessions. Then live another 10 years missing it all. Makes no sense to me anyway.
 
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Thompson Centers we’re so popular in the 70s and 80s for the simple reason they were affordable, well made and they worked. They were a step above most offerings without costing an arm and a leg. Some in their early family life could afford them without taking out a second mortgage.

I’ve enjoyed mine made from a kit. It will go to one of my daughters along with a few others. The rest I may sell and use the proceeds to buy one that is foolishly expensive for my modest budget.
 

cynthialee

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I feel rather young in this conversation at 54. But with a heart condition and other issues usually reserved for septuagenarians and older I feel this conversation deeply.

I have been frank with my spouse the relative value of my firearms and she knows to not sell them to a pawn shop. I figure that they will sit in the gun safe until money is needed and sold off. I hope they find good homes and are not sold off in a buy back...But I have little to no control over this realm once I go to the next.

If I knew even one local young un with the urge to shoot then I'd leave a few to them in the will. But much like others here...there are no such critters in these parts. The few that do like firearms have magnumitis and mass fire power fever. My simple guns are an anachronism to them. Pity...my marksmanship with a rifle didn't get decent until I started shooting side lock rifles. The need to get it right the first time become of paramount importance when one has but a single bullet to achieve the goal.

I do think that there might be a come back to these rifles eventually. Interests and hobbies come and go like the tides. Eventually there might be a resurgence of interest in the general populace. One can hope.

I think part of the sell to the younger generation is their primitive nature. No one is going to steal a musket and go on a rampage. It just isn't going to happen. It takes knowing what you are doing to load them.
I think the single shot and close in nature of hunting with them can be an allure. It isn't modern hunting where the animal has basically zero chance if it is spotted. The few times I have encountered conversations amongst the young ones anti hunting it has mostly focused on how it is unfair. When I bring up hunting with old timey guns and the limited range and one shot, the resounding chorus is 'oh that is different'. Their objections to hunting are seriously reduced when presented with this alternative. Something to think on.
 

sportster73hp

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I have been collecting for 30 something years. Wife knows what i spent on most of my muzzleloaders many purchased with plastic .
I enjoy the hobby and left instructions on who to consult if i go first. By the way i also am 54. Don’t plan to go any time soon.
 

Capnball

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I feel rather young in this conversation at 54. But with a heart condition and other issues usually reserved for septuagenarians and older I feel this conversation deeply.

I have been frank with my spouse the relative value of my firearms and she knows to not sell them to a pawn shop. I figure that they will sit in the gun safe until money is needed and sold off. I hope they find good homes and are not sold off in a buy back...But I have little to no control over this realm once I go to the next.

If I knew even one local young un with the urge to shoot then I'd leave a few to them in the will. But much like others here...there are no such critters in these parts. The few that do like firearms have magnumitis and mass fire power fever. My simple guns are an anachronism to them. Pity...my marksmanship with a rifle didn't get decent until I started shooting side lock rifles. The need to get it right the first time become of paramount importance when one has but a single bullet to achieve the goal.

I do think that there might be a come back to these rifles eventually. Interests and hobbies come and go like the tides. Eventually there might be a resurgence of interest in the general populace. One can hope.

I think part of the sell to the younger generation is their primitive nature. No one is going to steal a musket and go on a rampage. It just isn't going to happen. It takes knowing what you are doing to load them.
I think the single shot and close in nature of hunting with them can be an allure. It isn't modern hunting where the animal has basically zero chance if it is spotted. The few times I have encountered conversations amongst the young ones anti hunting it has mostly focused on how it is unfair. When I bring up hunting with old timey guns and the limited range and one shot, the resounding chorus is 'oh that is different'. Their objections to hunting are seriously reduced when presented with this alternative. Something to think on.
Lol
, IDK I see some guys out at the range and I'm thinking "the wildlife on the muzzle end of his gun is completely safe!"
 

Tn poor boy

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I fill you alls pain im 61 .i was thanking about this same thing a few months back. I went got me a pad and pen wrote. Out to whom my smoke poles go .My grandsons one being 7yr old the other 2 yrs both brothers. My first hp rifle was bought by mh mother and so on not to be sold but passed on
 

Capnball

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I got
I fill you alls pain im 61 .i was thanking about this same thing a few months back. I went got me a pad and pen wrote. Out to whom my smoke poles go .My grandsons one being 7yr old the other 2 yrs both brothers. My first hp rifle was bought by mh mother and so on not to be sold but passed on
Great thought. I've got two rifles and two pistols.
I have two sons and twin grandchildren on the way!
I'm all set! LOL
 

Rock Home Isle

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I had a chat with my grandsons. The older one wants my original .50 calibre CVA Mountain Rifle…he loves the stories about that gun and trips it’s taken in the field. The younger one wants the .50 CVA Mountain Rifle kit, that I’ve had for the last 15 years. He wants me to build it, and together we sight it in…now, what to do with the rest…
 
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Reading the comments here, some about what to do with ML accumulated but can’t be used. Fears of them ending up in a pawn shop or junk pile can be real.

How about willing them to a long standing local club to be given to a young shooter?

Or leaving them to the NMLRA designating them for young shooters.
 
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I feel rather young in this conversation at 54. But with a heart condition and other issues usually reserved for septuagenarians and older I feel this conversation deeply.

I have been frank with my spouse the relative value of my firearms and she knows to not sell them to a pawn shop. I figure that they will sit in the gun safe until money is needed and sold off. I hope they find good homes and are not sold off in a buy back...But I have little to no control over this realm once I go to the next.

If I knew even one local young un with the urge to shoot then I'd leave a few to them in the will. But much like others here...there are no such critters in these parts. The few that do like firearms have magnumitis and mass fire power fever. My simple guns are an anachronism to them. Pity...my marksmanship with a rifle didn't get decent until I started shooting side lock rifles. The need to get it right the first time become of paramount importance when one has but a single bullet to achieve the goal.

I do think that there might be a come back to these rifles eventually. Interests and hobbies come and go like the tides. Eventually there might be a resurgence of interest in the general populace. One can hope.

I think part of the sell to the younger generation is their primitive nature. No one is going to steal a musket and go on a rampage. It just isn't going to happen. It takes knowing what you are doing to load them.
I think the single shot and close in nature of hunting with them can be an allure. It isn't modern hunting where the animal has basically zero chance if it is spotted. The few times I have encountered conversations amongst the young ones anti hunting it has mostly focused on how it is unfair. When I bring up hunting with old timey guns and the limited range and one shot, the resounding chorus is 'oh that is different'. Their objections to hunting are seriously reduced when presented with this alternative. Something to think on.
I have always said, there is a difference in hunting and killing. if you try and give yourself every single advantage , you are just killing, like it or not. My brother and I hunted for years with Single shot rifles because we felt a good hunter should only need one shot. We only took shots that were good, ethical ,that we knew "we" could make. We were hunters, not killers.
 

Capnball

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Reading the comments here, some about what to do with ML accumulated but can’t be used. Fears of them ending up in a pawn shop or junk pile can be real.

How about willing them to a long standing local club to be given to a young shooter?

Or leaving them to the NMLRA designating them for young shooters.
The boy scouts used to have a firearms program when my boys were in it.
Neil
 

Capnball

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I have always said, there is a difference in hunting and killing. if you try and give yourself every single advantage , you are just killing, like it or not. My brother and I hunted for years with Single shot rifles because we felt a good hunter should only need one shot. We only took shots that were good, ethical ,that we knew "we" could make. We were hunters, not killers.
I always thought the difference was putting food on the table or just killing to get a tag.
I never shot anything I wasn't fully ready to clean and eat.
 
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