Mountain Man rifles

Discussion in 'Rocky Mountain Fur Trade' started by crockett, Sep 21, 2018.

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  1. Feb 7, 2019 #21

    tenngun

    tenngun

    tenngun

    Cannon

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    We have records of whites, mostly French Canadians grabbing fusils, while ‘Americans’ reached for a rifle. Tucumshe traded off a NWG for a rifle.
    Americans were making copies of the NWG and importing copies from Belgium, so fusils were avalible to white trappers.
    Certainly men did lose guns at times and had to restock from what was available. Forts and post would have some NWG on hand, and no doubt brigades had a few in their supplies.
    I hate to say this since I love ‘em smoothies, but I doubt an American trapper in the west during the MM period would have carried a fusil except in an emergency.
    Double barrel shotguns were also sent west. In the absence of a rifle I think most would have turned to a shot gun before a NWG
     
  2. Feb 7, 2019 #22

    32 ballard xl

    32 ballard xl

    32 ballard xl

    32 Cal.

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    I was a young man when the first post-war surge of enthusiasm for new bolt action rifles came along. Winchester M-70's, Remingtons, and Savage 110's. The cabin class, and those who wanted to be considered cabin class, bought Winchesters. Those who couldn't stand the cabin class bought Remingtons, and the guys who didn't care what the cabin class thought, bought Savages. Mountain Men were very likely the same. So were the buffalo hunters.
     
  3. Feb 7, 2019 #23

    Kansas Jake

    Kansas Jake

    Kansas Jake

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    32 ballard xl, along with your observation is the simple economics of how much money one had available to spend. Also, one can read trader's lists to get an idea of what they took to rendezvous or trading posts. Obviously some were traded with the locals, but also would be available to MM. All of these things would factor into what a MM used during the fur trade ere.
     
  4. Feb 7, 2019 #24

    Grimord

    Grimord

    Grimord

    Fyrstyk MLF Supporter

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    It has been reported that the hostile Indian tribes feared the Mountain Man and his rifle because of its extended range and accuracy. The trade guns of the times were no where near as accurate or far ranging. Also the natives were not consistent with their loads or the cleaning of the guns. The trade guns were alittle more forgiving when it came to care.
     
  5. Feb 8, 2019 #25

    tenngun

    tenngun

    tenngun

    Cannon

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    It should be noted that trade rifles were being sold to Indians by the US government factories by the late 1790s. After the government got out of the business contractors were making rifles for the fur companies.
    Indians could get their hands on a rifle during the fur tradeMM period, but NWG would continue to be sold well into the reservation period.
     

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