Modern vs. Antique Muzzle Loaders for Film and TV

Discussion in 'General Muzzleloading' started by Zac, Aug 19, 2019.

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  1. Sep 1, 2019 #41

    seaguy

    seaguy

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    Quimbly! Really?... It’s QUIGLY! Man....unforgivable for a Tom Selleck movie!
     
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  2. Sep 2, 2019 #42

    Rat

    Rat

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    That was another movie, "Quimby Up Over".
     
  3. Sep 2, 2019 #43

    TFoley

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    Getting something as seemingly simple as the WHOOSH-bang of a muzzle-loader going off - whether it is new or old - they ALL do the same thing - can make or break a motion picture image. Just like the British WW1 troops in one very expensive movie shooting No4 rifles from WW2 - it's an easy thing to get wrong, and take away any credibility that the movie is aiming for.

    A muzzle-loader, old or new, DOES go WHOOSH-Bang - some faster than others. Watching the ambush scene in 'Patriot', with the British troops shooting their Brown Bess muskets, is a two-minute lesson in the visuals of a musket shooting

    A few minutes spent watching Youtube with people like Mike Beliveau, Murpheys Muskets, capandball, ANY bunch of rondy enthusiasts taking part in a trail shoot, would be better than reading ALL our pontifications over the last couple of weeks.



    Similarly, a visit to any 17thC re-enactment exhibition or a historical site, or just watching a scene like the battle of Camden from 'Patriot', would convince anybody, surely?

    To say that I've bitten my knuckles in sheer frustration reading this thread so far would not be an exaggeration. This is 'Murca!!!! How hard can it REALLY be to see a BP rifle or musket doing its thing?
     
  4. Sep 2, 2019 #44

    Rockvillerich

    Rockvillerich

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    Imagine sometime in the future a film maker wanting to have a car in his production...yeah, a Jaguar is a cool looking car, but not the sort of thing we'd expect a school teacher, or Elliot Ness to be driving. Depending on your location you might want to attend an 18th century reenactment and talk to the people in one of the militia companies, who would typically have a variety of civilian flintlock long guns, and more importantly, a lot of information about what would be accurate for your purpose. Good luck!
     
  5. Sep 10, 2019 #45

    MTCossack

    MTCossack

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    To the OP, also consider whether you're going to show the muzzle of the gun in your film - I'm having a hard time picturing a muzzle blast without also seeing the muzzle. Are you going to superimpose the muzzle flash onto a non-firing prop-gunwith the wonders of cinematographic wizardry? Will it be a nighttime scene where the gun is obscured? Otherwise it seems that you'll want a prop that's authentic to the period, more or less.

    Otherwise, as has been stated, as long as you use real black powder, it doesn't matter too much what kind of muzzleloading gun you use. The audience isn't likely to notice or care.
     
  6. Sep 10, 2019 #46

    azmntman

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    The enquirer dosn't seem to know what he wants plus a woefull ignorance of history

    Wow, I read each post and I cannot tell the gentlemen is history ignorant? Perhaps he has less knowledge than many of us here on this forum but why are we here? WE LOVE BP GUNS! He may wipe the smirck off yer face if we start to studying and replicating paper used in printers, ink used in printers, preparation of dyes from natural sources, etc. etc. Lets not run off another inquiring mind.

    My answer to the question is same as several above....without showing the ignition (match, wheel, flint, cap) it really wont matter as the flash will be the same UNLESS you are talked into using a replica powder. For the most realistic filming GET REAL BLACK POWDER.
     
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  7. Sep 10, 2019 #47

    biliff

    biliff

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    FWIW, the OP hasn’t been around for two weeks. He asked his question, got what he wanted and probably will never be heard from again.
     
  8. Sep 10, 2019 #48

    Pete G

    Pete G

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    We had a fella walk up during a BPCR match and ask"I that one o them Squiggly rafles?":confused:
     

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