Moccasins

Discussion in 'Clothing' started by Sparkitoff, Aug 18, 2018.

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  1. Aug 18, 2018 #1

    Sparkitoff

    Sparkitoff

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    My son decided to make some moccasins. He has been wearing them around town and really likes them. He would like to take them to the woods. When he tried, he said every stick and rock hurt his foot and a lot of small stuff stuck in the leather. Is there a way to overcome this?
     
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  2. Aug 18, 2018 #2

    Loyalist Dave

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    Switch to shoes. :wink:

    Not trying to be a "smart-backside"..., but mocs are referred to in journals from back-in-the-day as a "decent way of going barefoot". Journals also note having to repair them each night :grin:

    I've found elk and moose hide help, but my 20th century feet even in the 21st century aren't hardened as those of the folks that lived in mocs.

    They do give an advantage when creeping through the woods...., allows you to feel what's beneath, and thus not step down on stuff that will hurt or worse, stuff that will snap and spook the game.

    One should also have three pair for woods walks..., one to wear, one as a backup and one pair for repair..., and you rotate them as the trek progesses.

    LD
     
  3. Aug 18, 2018 #3

    Black Hand

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    Adding multiple soft leather soles and using a liner/insole made of several layers of wool makes a big difference. One also needs to learn to walk in moccasins - modern shoes have us coming down hard on our heels and rolling off the toes, while in moccasins, the ball of the foot comes down first then rolling to the heel. You MUST also pay attention to where you put your feet. Walking in moccasins is a learned skill, once mastered, the discomfort is eliminated (other than the occasional time when you forget and walk modern).
     
  4. Aug 18, 2018 #4

    tenngun

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    It’s a good skill. Moccs can be pretty slippery, so you lean that waking balls and toes first, you do get weight lifters calfs from it. One needs to learn to watch the ground. Mind each step as it were. Walking in town is hard on moccs and doesn’t teach the skill. Until you learn it you have to think about it, once learned it’s like riding a bike.
     
  5. Aug 18, 2018 #5

    NeilMacleod

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    Add crepe rubber to them, will also help no slip when on shiny floors.
    Search for other threads on Moccasins.
     
  6. Aug 19, 2018 #6

    smo

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    I just use good brand name insoles they really help the tinder footed. :wink:
     
  7. Aug 19, 2018 #7

    Crewdawg445

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    There is... I ONLY wear mocs. The most important factor is good leather. I prefer to use elk, moose or bison. For me, deer hide wears out way to fast. Mocs indeed are a acquired comfort item, as is learning to wear them in the forest.

    I also use a little 21st century in my mocs in the form of shoe goo. Multiple layers applied to the sole area improves wear, comfort and longevity while still maintaining quietness in the forest.

    [​IMG]

    Also If I may add, when making mocs it is important to fit them very tight. Reason is once broken in the leather will stretch and become increasingly uncomfortable over time. Sewing them with a very tight fit ensures they will stretch and contour to your foot accordingly.

    Lastly, one needs to accept the fact your feet WILL get wet in mocs. A facet one must accept. While I grease mine with tallow, over time the morning dew creeps in and the toots become wet, again even when wet vitaly important you make the fit tight! Once the day is over, lay them by the fire to dry and you are set!

    Again, wearing mocs will teach you to be mindful of foot placement. A learned skill none the less. No amount of reinforcement though will save your foot from a black locust thorn or the like, again be mindful of were the foot goes and you'll be surprised at just how comfortable they truly are. :hatsoff:
     
  8. Aug 22, 2018 #8

    Sparkitoff

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    Thank you!
     
  9. Aug 23, 2018 #9

    crockett

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    William Drummond Stewart wrote about stuffing grass into his moccasins before he had to run over some rough ground. So- even in the day- they had issues. I would get some heavy felt , maybe several layers, and put them inside the mocs.
     
  10. Aug 25, 2018 #10

    jrmflintlock

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    As others have said, it’s a learning process. You also use different muscles when walking “properly” in Mocs. So until those muscles are strengthened there is soreness in lots of places in addition to the feet!.

    It’s one of the things I have the most trouble with when hunting in my “traditional” garb.
     
  11. Aug 25, 2018 #11

    Rifleman1776

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    I love wearing soft soled mocs. But, as others have said, wearing the requires a learning process and some concessions. To minimize wear I avoid gravel, blacktop and concrete. They are the perfect footwear in mild temps with dry grass. For other tasks, like trying to get out of a canoe and climb up a wet, steep and muddy bank is an exercise in futility. DAMHIK :redface:
     
  12. Aug 25, 2018 #12

    tenngun

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    :rotf: been there done that.
     
  13. Aug 25, 2018 #13

    Crewdawg445

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    Myself as well... Went fishing for a rifle along the way. :shake:
     
  14. Sep 1, 2018 #14

    stubshaft

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    :rotf: I thought that was one of the "requirements" in order to pass Moccassin 101.
     
  15. Sep 3, 2018 #15

    Mad Irish Jack

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    Location:
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    Sparkitoff, You mentioned your son made his. Did he just want mocs, or does he want to be in a pair for a particular Historical Period portrayal? I made what are referred to as the the Fort Ligonier Boot. I have a pattern I obtained when my group was privileged a visit to the bowels (basement) of the museum at Ft Ligonier in Ligonier PA. We had access to the archeives. Their site is on line and one of the best Fort sites in PA, and the East for that matter.
    Those moc/boots are made with a sole, a right and left side and collar. The were made primarily with deer hides, but elk was also used. I ALSO need the cushion for my feet base, so I used a product I got from Lietzau Taxidermy in Cosmos, Minnesota. It's referred to as Sole Rectangles {Thickest} (L or XL); at the time I got the Moose Neck leather (It also came in Buffalo) for thickness (My moose came 3/4" thick for my soles). You can Google or computer search for their info. I walked less than 100 yards on B modified stone on mine with no discomfort. They are as other mocs on dry leaves and muddy hillsides. Proceed with caution. If your interested in the pattern, contact me PM and we'll make arrangements to get it to you.
     
  16. Sep 11, 2018 #16

    Sparkitoff

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    Thanks!
     
  17. Oct 19, 2018 #17

    nuttbush

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    I know this thread started off with a question about moccasins, shoes were mentioned by someone. Fugawee makes period colonial footwear that's good in the woods if you're looking for period shoes.
    Hope this helps someone. https://www.fugawee.com/
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 27, 2018
  18. Nov 3, 2018 #18

    dgracia

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    I have to wear some custom orthotics because of an ankle problem and have found that to make wearing them much more comfortable. No need for custom ones, but get some insoles and put those inside. Won't be like hard shoes but will be better.

    To make them last longer, put some gunk or shoe goo on the bottom of the mocs and, after it dries a bit, go out and walk on a dirt road or trail. That will add a protective coating on the leather while embedding enough trail debris to just look like you've walked a lot in them as the dirt and gravel sticks to the Shoe Goo.

    By the way, you will find walking on wet grass or snow up a slight hill to be quite challenging...been there, done that. Heaven help you if it's an uphill muddy incline. I once got the nickname of "Mr. Muddy" from one such experience at a reenactment in North Carolina. I was almost to the top of the hill where the parking area was and then slipped and slid all the way back down to the bottom of the hill.

    Twisted_1in66
    Dan
     
  19. Nov 4, 2018 #19

    Sure Shot Rick

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    Get a good athletic shoe insert and cut to fit. They will always be slick. you can also sew some cow hide soles to them.
     
  20. Nov 4, 2018 #20

    Le Loup

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    There are several ways you can solve this problem, one is add an insole of leather, another is to stitch on extra soles, & the other is to cobble extra soles.
    https://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com/2011/09/cobbling-soles-on-moccasins-shoes.html
    [​IMG]
    https://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com/2009/07/moccasins-for-white-man.html
    https://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com/2012/07/prolonging-use-of-your-moccasins-on.html
     

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