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Marking Identification: New England Militia Musket

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David Burke

32 Cal
Joined
Jun 9, 2024
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Good afternoon,

I am looking for guidance in identifying a proof mark on my grandfather's New England Militia Musket, cal .69, C. 1830s. The rifle features a Lane and Reed, Boston lockplate and is an original flintlock rifle. I believe it is an early stylized eagle marking, a very early marking in US production. I cannot find any reference to it, and hope the community may shed some light/information. Please see the photo below. Happy Sunday.

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Good afternoon,

I am looking for guidance in identifying a proof mark on my grandfather's New England Militia Musket, cal .69, C. 1830s. The rifle features a Lane and Reed, Boston lockplate and is an original flintlock rifle. I believe it is an early stylized eagle marking, a very early marking in US production. I cannot find any reference to it, and hope the community may shed some light/information. Please see the photo below. Happy Sunday.

View attachment 326212
Good photo; is intriguing! Perhaps a stylized Eagle, it would seem.
 
Enlarged, it looks nothing like an eagle. Possibly an imported or recycled barrel with the original proof mark overstruck to obliterate.View attachment 326600

Yes it does resemble an overstruck symbol, and perhaps because it's in the vicinity of the "U.S." it was some other stamp that was misapplied to this particular musket?

LD
 
Please see several more photos of the rifle overall. Thank you.
 

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Lane & Reed of Boston were importers. The lock is a later English commercial type, probably about 1820-30ish. The stampings are odd. I can make out what does appear to be right facing eagle super imposed over something. The eagle was facing left by 1833 and significantly skinnier. The barrel has a left side flat which are seen on French barrels. The furnishings are commercial from what is seen. The barrel appears to have been shortened due to lack of bayonet stud/front sight and abrupt way the forearm ends. You have a parts gun, that could have been a militia gun or could have been made by the various surplus houses for sell to poor westward bound immigrants.
 

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