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Making a hunting sword from a machete

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What you have made may look like a hunting sword at a distant glance, but among a few other points, a hunting sword blade would start out with some noticeable thickness at and below the guard for a way, tapering to the point. I applaud your efforts, but the results simply fall a bit short as far as representing an 18th century piece. If you cannot forge, grind or heat treat a proper blade, buy one. Some of the best makers started with store bought blades until they were able to do it themselves. Study on some of the 18th c. surviving pieces.
 
I applaud your work and will check out your other videos! On the path of learning don’t let perfection be the enemy of the good! While it is true that a forged sword might have distal taper, many a bladesmith starts the journey by modifying existing blades like this. Such may well serve adequately in one’s living history representation or it might just be the starting point.

The same seems to be true with bags, clothing and even guns. The first attempt isn’t the best or last, but without the first attempt the journey doesn’t get started.
 
What you have made may look like a hunting sword at a distant glance, but among a few other points, a hunting sword blade would start out with some noticeable thickness at and below the guard for a way, tapering to the point. I applaud your efforts, but the results simply fall a bit short as far as representing an 18th century piece. If you cannot forge, grind or heat treat a proper blade, buy one. Some of the best makers started with store bought blades until they were able to do it themselves. Study on some of the 18th c. surviving pieces.

Respectfully, the video is about making a 18th hunting sword/hanger/cutlass from a 16 dollar machete, you simply aren't going to get that distal taper. I can and have forged swords, however, that was not the point of the video. The point of the video was to make one from a cheap machete. Also I have studied originals from the 1690s-1740s extensively, and there were slab side (without fuller) blades that would resemble the blade from this project.
 
Respectfully, the video is about making a 18th hunting sword/hanger/cutlass from a 16 dollar machete, you simply aren't going to get that distal taper. I can and have forged swords, however, that was not the point of the video. The point of the video was to make one from a cheap machete. Also I have studied originals from the 1690s-1740s extensively, and there were slab side (without fuller) blades that would resemble the blade from this project.
Respectfully, all you've really done is make a narrow machete that has a guard. By making an already too thin of a sword blade more narrow, you have increased its flexibility properties and diminished its penetration abilities. Hunting swords were not just for a coup de gras, but also as a last defense against an enraged beast. You have made a nice looking costume accessory or wall hanger. No pun intended.
 
Respectfully, all you've really done is make a narrow machete that has a guard. By making an already too thin of a sword blade more narrow, you have increased its flexibility properties and diminished its penetration abilities. Hunting swords were not just for a coup de gras, but also as a last defense against an enraged beast. You have made a nice looking costume accessory or wall hanger. No pun intended.
It is perfectly capable, thank you for your kind input, and I wish you well.
 
Just thought I would add this period correct English hunting sword/hanger for folks to see.

1712684218787.png

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Gus
 
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Here are a few "slab" blades. No Fuller. Quite common on many.
Outside two are early 18th century, inner two 19th century.
German hunting sword is called a Hirschfänger.
Anyone else interested in die Hirschfänger?

William
 

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So, I guess this means Ashton's Hunting hanger is historically correct?
 
So, I guess this means Ashton's Hunting hanger is historically correct?
Well...
Since the machete material is flexible, keeps somewhat of an edge, does not snap when hit against a stone... yes. The functionality of the material is better than the average metal from the time period. Forging helps in the material properties mentioned above as well as conserving high quality metal which was not so common.
The main "historical accurate" part is that many items were re-purposed to make hunting sword for the general populations. Many Hirschfänger exist today that were made from cut down or broken swords.
The blade material and some of the style could be considered (loosly) historically accurate, however the construction methods are modern.
This reminds me when I used up my father's 8" grinding wheels making a file into a knife. Anneling? What is annealing?
I am glad the Ashton is having fun doing it!

William
 
These are my inspirations for the blade and the hilt. These are originals.
 

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Well...
Since the machete material is flexible, keeps somewhat of an edge, does not snap when hit against a stone... yes. The functionality of the material is better than the average metal from the time period. Forging helps in the material properties mentioned above as well as conserving high quality metal which was not so common.
The main "historical accurate" part is that many items were re-purposed to make hunting sword for the general populations. Many Hirschfänger exist today that were made from cut down or broken swords.
The blade material and some of the style could be considered (loosly) historically accurate, however the construction methods are modern.
This reminds me when I used up my father's 8" grinding wheels making a file into a knife. Anneling? What is annealing?
I am glad the Ashton is having fun doing it!

William
William,
Thanks kindly for this additional info, it sounds totally plausible. You sound like someone who knows his swords. I just thought that the boys were being a little hard on Ashton because it didn't look to me like he was making something that couldn't have existed in the time period that he reenacts. I think his Hunting Sword came out great and I really enjoyed his post. It looks like a fun and worthwhile project.
 

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