Lyman GPR Cracked Stock

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Rod Man

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So yesterday I was practicing some off hand shooting with my new (2 months) Investarms Lyman GPR in .54. The day was going well, was laying'em in there petty tight with 90 grs of 2F Goex, CCI #11's. Set my rifle down on the table went down range to paste up the target walked back to the table and dang if I didn't notice crack in the stock. Called Lyman this morning and of course they don't have any Left handed stocks on hand, but they put the order in and at some point they will send me one. Has anybody else had this happen? Now days there is no telling how long of a wait I am in for. So, I got a .50 with a Hunter barrel at the gun shop on consignment was thinking of pulling it off the shelf and using that stock to keep shooting. Any of you Lyman peeps see a problem with that?, or am I going to have to modify it to where it might cause problems later for getting the .50 back together with the new stock comes in? Also, with the replacement stock will I most like need to do some fitting or are they pretty much plug and play.

Thoughts?

RM

This Sucks.

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So yesterday I was practicing some off hand shooting with my new (2 months) Investarms Lyman GPR in .54. The day was going well, was laying'em in there petty tight with 90 grs of 2F Goex, CCI #11's. Set my rifle down on the table went down range to paste up the target walked back to the table and dang if I didn't notice crack in the stock. Called Lyman this morning and of course they don't have any Left handed stocks on hand, but they put the order in and at some point they will send me one. Has anybody else had this happen? Now days there is no telling how long of a wait I am in for. So, I got a .50 with a Hunter barrel at the gun shop on consignment was thinking of pulling it off the shelf and using that stock to keep shooting. Any of you Lyman peeps see a problem with that?, or am I going to have to modify it to where it might cause problems later for getting the .50 back together with the new stock comes in? Also, with the replacement stock will I most like need to do some fitting or are they pretty much plug and play.

Thoughts?

RM

This Sucks.

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Yikes. As an aside, several yrs. ago I was at Dixon's and noticed they had a number of GPR stocks sitting in a rack. I asked why, and they were at that time a repair facility for the Lyman rifles. So maybe cracked stocks are something of an issue in general. I'll bet many guys will offer you good
advice about this, but it's good the company is sending you a replacement. I'm a Lefty, also! Good luck! I have a Lyman LH GPR Perc. .54, haven't really shot much. Nice guns!
 

The Appalachian

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Use brown tinted Brownell's Acraglass and squeegee it into the crack with an old credit card or a bondo speader. It's a very good slow cure epoxy so you can take your time. Keep carding it into the crack until you see it seep through to the inside of the crack. When it's cured the repair will be stronger than the wood was and you'll hardly even know it was ever cracked. It will just look like a line in the wood grain.

You can clean off any still wet excess when you're done with some WD40 on a rag and no harm will come to your stock finish.
 
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FWI My wood Cabelas (Investarms so a generic GPR) in .58 stock cracked like 10" on bottom. Had it repaired and glass bedded. Have to look to find it and after bedding shoots better than ever.
 

Idaho Ron

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One of my Renegade's cracked in the same place after an accident my son had. No matter how I glued it. No matter how I pinned it. The heavy recoil of the conical bullets kept breaking it at the crack.
I finally gave up on that stock.
 

Rod Man

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First,

Thank you all for your comments and suggestions!!!

Much appreciated!

I am very aware of what can happen if one over torques the lock bolts and I am very careful about it. Just enough so that lock is set and doesn’t wiggle around screw/bolt is not loose.

They are supposed to send me a new one as I mentioned earlier but the way things are now days, I think we can all agree, I might as well try and repair what I got and keep shooting. It may be a while before I see it.

I have a .50 Percussion GPR Hunter (fast twist 1/32?) on Consignment At a Gun Shop in Berryville was thinking about pulling it off the shelf and swapping the barrels and triggers since they are better.
While I sort out the stock situation. Then after it’s all done I’ll have back up.

I got options.

RM
 
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Since you have a new stock coming...
Get some Titebond in the crack and clamp it but good, overnight. Most likely it will hold up fine even well after the new stock arrives.
Typically wood glues like Titebond don’t adhere well to themselves in my experience if repair fails and you try to re-glue, while Acraglas for example, is designed to adhere to itself. Just something to think about.
 

CaptainKirk

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Typically wood glues like Titebond don’t adhere well to themselves in my experience if repair fails and you try to re-glue, while Acraglas for example, is designed to adhere to itself. Just something to think about.
Good to know. I used Titebond on my GPR stock but havent had a chance to shoot it yet.
 

N.Y. Yankee

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My Investarms .54 GPR did the same thing and I thought the screw wasn't too tight. Oh well. I tried to repair it with epoxy and sand it smooth because it was lifting up a feather of wood. very sharp and caught my finger twice. I even covered the repair with several coats satin polyurethane. Let everything cure and reassembled. 12 shout later, the crack was back! I was fortunate to find a pre-enjoyed stock on ebay. Not as nicely figured but it's back to shooting.
 
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With all the wood removed in that area that sideplate panel and the sides of the trigger inlet are about the only areas where the grain flows through to the wrist. Loading and shooting can make the wood flex. Especially with the bolt hole making a weak spot in the grain. I've seen any number of rifles cracked from the hole to the barrel channel. A bedded breech might help some.
That's another reason I have started using undersized balls and thicker patching. It puts less pressure in that area when loading without losing any accuracy.
 
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First,

Thank you all for your comments and suggestions!!!

Much appreciated!

I am very aware of what can happen if one over torques the lock bolts and I am very careful about it. Just enough so that lock is set and doesn’t wiggle around screw/bolt is not loose.

They are supposed to send me a new one as I mentioned earlier but the way things are now days, I think we can all agree, I might as well try and repair what I got and keep shooting. It may be a while before I see it.

I have a .50 Percussion GPR Hunter (fast twist 1/32?) on Consignment At a Gun Shop in Berryville was thinking about pulling it off the shelf and swapping the barrels and triggers since they are better.
While I sort out the stock situation. Then after it’s all done I’ll have back up.

I got options.

RM
I've repair many rifles with this issue over past years when operating my ML business.
On most modern factory produced production rifles they are machine inletted & fitting at the breech & barrel channel is poor.
Poor fit in the breech & barrel channel area causes wandering groups & often cracking appears in the breech area. The best inexpensive cure is to glass bed the barrel & breech areas with Accra-glass or a similar product. This is not a difficult process & good how-to videos are available on websites like utube.
 
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