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smoothshooter

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We read a lot about pulling a ball, and shooters having a full horn of powder but only four or five ball.
A mold of the time got pretty hot to hold after a few cast, and ladles were pretty small. It’s a lot easier to melt 1/4 pound of lead then a pound.
I THINK that ball was pulled and recast pretty often
“Hars wet powder and no fire to dry it’ was an old saying. I bet powder was spread out to dry pretty often and dry fresh loads replaced

Sometimes it would be dangerous to fire to clear the barrel, because the noise might alert enemies.
 

smoothshooter

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I believe that guns were loaded all the time out in the wilds. An unloaded gun is pretty worthless. And one never knew when one would need a gun out there. I also believe that they knew how to keep a load viable, and tended to them often.
If the threat level was low, there would be little reason to have all guns loaded all the time. Especially when out on the prairie where someone approaching could be seen a mile or more away. Plenty of time to load your gun before they got close. Once loaded you would know you have a freshly loaded and primed gun ready to go..
 

Bushfire

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I'm not one to complain that a thread got sidetracked and im not, but just to realign it for my purposes if guys coming in now still want to help.

I'm wanting to know how longhunters did it through the mid 18th century so I can use that methodology to keep a reliable charge in a gun under humid/wet conditions on a multi day hunt.

If you want to digress into talking on the plains and flintlocks do continue, it'll be of interest to me also.
 
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One thing you definitely don't want to do is to bring the rifle out of cold weather into a warm humid room. Moisture will collect inside and outside the barrel. I hunted a lot in western Oregon and Southeast Alaska. Lots of rain and humidity. A piece of electrical tape over the end of the barrel will keep the rain out. It may not be hysterically correct but it works. No it won't blow up the barrel when you fire it either.
 

Bushfire

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One thing you definitely don't want to do is to bring the rifle out of cold weather into a warm humid room. Moisture will collect inside and outside the barrel. I hunted a lot in western Oregon and Southeast Alaska. Lots of rain and humidity. A piece of electrical tape over the end of the barrel will keep the rain out. No it won't blow up the barrel when you fire it either.
No concerns there, I've been doing that since I was a kid.

The types of hunts I'm referring to is camping outside, at times under the stars, in a swag or under a rock shelter or similar. Gun is exposed to the elements pretty much 24/7
 

Bushfire

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Raid the ankle biters crayons and run a bead around the lip of the pan.
Prime it, and close it.
Ive done this here in the pacific north wet for decades, it always goes bang.
That's mostly about the prime being protected? I haven't but should try that, to date I've just dumped the prime throughout the day if necessary.

It's protecting that main charge I'm worried about.
 
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Finding two to three hundred year old frontiersmen being rather a challenge & even they would likley have different ideas . But the guns are still able to 'talk' the hole or wire staples indicate quills where at least to some extent once used. I generally drill a suitable series of feather holes or wire staples under the butt on cheek stocked wheellocks . & Matchlocks sport all sorts of holes some to put out the match cord others for vent picks and the stainless steel wire brushes sold for breech loaders & threaded 8 32 UNF made a usefull item to keep in a hole that your rod will screw onto . an item I generally put into the slideing wooden tool box most call a patchbox along with A worm ' ball drawer ' flints & Maybe a vent pick .. The wire brushes being best to grip cloth on a jag . This is all new made guns that go on' open sparks '.
The caplocks I got sealed with a bit of rubber to seal the nipple the .& short of fireing off and cleaning best you can do is wipe out the foul bore on top of the load and the lightest oiling . preserved my guns on long trips .
I held it muzzle down to find the welcome ledges I remember one long 12 day descent of the Homathko River in British Collumbia Big country no tracks. Was in a swollen narrow creak and ide the old 490 percussion to probe for the rocky ledges for a foothold . Big country can get knarly quite often ( Ive concluded a gun has to stand immersion now & then or its ill suited for big trips ( this was incidently from Tatkla Lake to Butte inlett via the Mosley up into the Teidmann Glacsial run off into Cleft camp near Murderers Bar & on down the Canyon to Cumsack Creek LoggIng show. Where I Set on And got cleaned up , fattened up, and made a few quid ere the weather shut us all down & got flown out on float planes . But I digress , I mean I Was a' wanderer' after all'
Rambling Rudyard
 
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One thing you definitely don't want to do is to bring the rifle out of cold weather into a warm humid room. Moisture will collect inside and outside the barrel. I hunted a lot in western Oregon and Southeast Alaska. Lots of rain and humidity. A piece of electrical tape over the end of the barrel will keep the rain out. It may not be hysterically correct but it works. No it won't blow up the barrel when you fire it either.

Not meaning to correct you sir, but when we Aussies did our J work in a certain Asian country over 4 decades ago we used Condoms and rubber bands to cover our weapons muzzles.
I still use the same MO here to this day with ML's Black powder being what it is.
 
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The plains can be deceptive though even in seemingly flat areas. There can often be little swales and draws where one can hide.
As more than one pilgrim found out when joe the Indian popped up looking for targets. (I have been to Kansas)

I have never had rain or etc. get past the ball and patch or shot and wad column and degrade the powder charge.
I usually try to keep the muzzle down and the lock covered under my coat or whatever.
 
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Can't find unlubricated condoms anymore......guess you could get the ribbed ones for extra shooting pleasure.

But I have found Saran wrap and a rubber band works equally well. If you are running a cap gun, works for the cap too. I use those below. $10 and you have a forever supply.

Of course, nothing historically about that.......but I think it answers the OP's question well.


 
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Can't find unlubricated condoms anymore......guess you could get the ribbed ones for extra shooting pleasure.

But I have found Saran wrap and a rubber band works equally well. If you are running a cap gun, works for the cap too. I use those below. $10 and you have a forever supply.

Of course, nothing historically about that.......but I think it answers the OP's question well.



Apologies but you missed a subtle point, a condom over your Muzzle indicates you have Stud like qualities, whereas some Saran wrap / Glad wrap hints that the individual is a mere short order Burger flipper; there again if an individual is a rusted on socialist with snow flake tendencies; then "he/she" is a mere rivet rather than a Stud.
 
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Finding two to three hundred year old frontiersmen being rather a challenge & even they would likley have different ideas . But the guns are still able to 'talk' the hole or wire staples indicate quills where at least to some extent once used. I generally drill a suitable series of feather holes or wire staples under the butt on cheek stocked wheellocks . & Matchlocks sport all sorts of holes some to put out the match cord others for vent picks and the stainless steel wire brushes sold for breech loaders & threaded 8 32 UNF made a usefull item to keep in a hole that your rod will screw onto . an item I generally put into the slideing wooden tool box most call a patchbox along with A worm ' ball drawer ' flints & Maybe a vent pick .. The wire brushes being best to grip cloth on a jag . This is all new made guns that go on' open sparks '.
The caplocks I got sealed with a bit of rubber to seal the nipple the .& short of fireing off and cleaning best you can do is wipe out the foul bore on top of the load and the lightest oiling . preserved my guns on long trips .
I held it muzzle down to find the welcome ledges I remember one long 12 day descent of the Homathko River in British Collumbia Big country no tracks. Was in a swollen narrow creak and ide the old 490 percussion to probe for the rocky ledges for a foothold . Big country can get knarly quite often ( Ive concluded a gun has to stand immersion now & then or its ill suited for big trips ( this was incidently from Tatkla Lake to Butte inlett via the Mosley up into the Teidmann Glacsial run off into Cleft camp near Murderers Bar & on down the Canyon to Cumsack Creek LoggIng show. Where I Set on And got cleaned up , fattened up, and made a few quid ere the weather shut us all down & got flown out on float planes . But I digress , I mean I Was a' wanderer' after all'
Rambling Rudyard

I always enjoy your accounts Ruddy, you've lived a full life mate.
 
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Apologies but you missed a subtle point, a condom over your Muzzle indicates you have Stud like qualities, whereas some Saran wrap / Glad wrap hints that the individual is a mere short order Burger flipper; there again if an individual is a rusted on socialist with snow flake tendencies; then "he/she" is a mere rivet rather than a Stud.
HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!

Your writing style leads me to believe you have read and studied under McManus.
 
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The plains can be deceptive though even in seemingly flat areas. There can often be little swales and draws where one can hide.
Was thinking that
Antelope-pronghorn goat are well known for their eyesight. They have something like 30 power binoculars built in their heads.
They know the value of wide open spaces and you don’t often see them where vision is obscured
But I took one at less then thirty yards. I bet we have more then one hunter on this forum that bagged more then one with his front stuffer. And long before the first gun shot was heard in America there was plenty antelope stew in Indians bellies.
Wide open spaces are rarely wide open spaces
 
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I do plug the vent overnight but exposure to the air throughout the day is more my concern.

As an example, recently I loaded my gun and went off for a hunt. Being winter there is humidity in the air. Repeated this the next couple of weeks. Start of each hunt pricked the vent.

After 3 weeks I finally shot off the charge and had 3 flashes in the pan before it fired. Something is getting at the main charge I feel.

Maybe I need to invest in a cows knee? I'll do whatever it takes to have reliable ignition in the field on a multi day hunt.
If you’ve got spare leather lying around, it’s cheaper to make the cows knee yourself. Plus the satisfaction of making it yourself.
 
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i use grouse feather's that curve for a vent plug in cruddy weather. the downward curve covers the pan and sheds rain.
i have been known to pluck a duck for the same purpose if i can get one to sit still long enough. the belly feather has a quill just about right for the vent and they are water proof. works great in snow, and lasts long enough for me to get out of the rain. did i ever mention i hate being out in the rain?
 
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i use grouse feather's that curve for a vent plug in cruddy weather. the downward curve covers the pan and sheds rain.
i have been known to pluck a duck for the same purpose if i can get one to sit still long enough. the belly feather has a quill just about right for the vent and they are water proof. works great in snow, and lasts long enough for me to get out of the rain. did i ever mention i hate being out in the rain?
Well Pluck A Duck! Never thought of that! Of course I’d get a citation from the city for plucking a duck at the park….
 
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:D mostly i just go down to my neighbors and pick them up off the ground! i am the worlds worst organizer so the drawer full of them i thought i had from last years duck plucking isn't there anymore. where they go is like the dryer mystery! two socks in one sock out.
I did find a well insulated mouse nest one time. talk about feather beds. pampered mice.
 
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