Longhunter footwear

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Muskeg Stomper

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Fugawee is now making a pair of reproduction colonial shoes called the Lexington.
"The left/right Concord And Lexington is unlined and made of a heavier leather than the Franklin.The Lexington is 5/8 of an inch deeper then the regular Concord. The Lexington only comes in smooth at this time. This shoe is to afford the more mature reenactors space to place orthotics inserts or Inner soles without compromising fit. Thus giving more time to walk about, instead of sitting with aching feet wishing you could go visiting."
When I'm in the market for a new pair of buckle shoes, this is the route that I'm going to take.

For hunting or trekking, consider these.
Fugawee Hi-Low Trekkers
Yes they are still a little slick but you can always go to the shoe department at Walmart and buy those little tack-on rubber heel plates and stick on traction pads that they make for women's high heels. They work wonders for adding traction and nobody can usually see the difference
 

William O.

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Well, one solution would be the wear something that fits and works well for the task at hand even it it means covering your feet in something that is only loosly based on historical designs and find some way to cover them up or hide as much as you can, thus my suggestion for leggings. If it was going to be a 4 day hunt in the snow then I doubt anyone could see what you were wearing on your feet but might be able to hear it in your voice, like when you brag that your feet don't have frostbite. As noted, the Hi-Low Trekers have impressed many people, or you can always make some mocs for yourself. If you need a source of moose hide let me know and I'll give you some links to check out, plus I am sure plans for making yourself a pair would show up pretty quick too.
I've seen folks modify those suede Minitonka brand mocs into useable and period correct items (at a distance)
 

Onojutta

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Everytime I read of or see a picture of what most have described as HC footwear from the 18th century, my immediate reaction is that surely there had to be better footwear available then. After all, those people needed to survive on the frontier, not just recreate as we do. Like many things in life, often I find that the old timers of yesteryear had a better (and simpler) solution to many problems that modern technology claims to solve.

But, perhaps the greatest insight here is that as someone mentioned, when the longhunters and Indians could hunt year round, survival on the frontier meant you had all your meat for the winter skinned and salted long before many of us even purchase our hunting licenses, and so there wasn't need for boots that kept the feet warm and dry at 20 degrees F.
 

Muskeg Stomper

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so there wasn't need for boots that kept the feet warm and dry at 20 degrees F.
I doubt it. There are plenty of examples of native mocassins that will keep your feet warm at those temperatures and the French in Canada were smart enough to adopt similar footwear. The English settlers along the coast line were either not that smart or we just haven't found documented examples. Folks who had to operate in the cold of winter generaly stayed close to home and those that didn't adopted native footwear or suffered terribly.
 

flintlock75

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I have made and use a pair of caribou hide overboots, I wear my regular mocs inside and tied up the outer shell, they have the hair on the inside, i placed a piece with the hair out fro a bottom sole for traction. they work very well at -20 deg.



I use a leather strap to tie them up, they come up to my knee in hight.
 

tg

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I belive the true longhunter was not a winter type person as the hides were not in proper shape at this time.
 

Spence10

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flintlock75 said:
I have made and use a pair of caribou hide overboots....
Excellent.

The main problem in my area is that it isn't cold enough. The temperature doesn't stay below freezing long enough so that everything freezes. When you go out in it, you inevitably get your feet wet. Wet feet are cold feet. If temperatures are low enough to freeze everything up your feet stay dry, and can be warm.

Spence
 

Guest
Try the Stitchin Scottsman in Iowa, he makes some incredible mocs and will just about make anything you wish. Check his web site.
Good Luck
 

tg

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I think there is a pair of overshoe type things in the Illustrated Rev War Encyclopedia they may have been fairly common, it seem like a good idea.
 

mikee51848

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In a memoir I'm reading about Arnold's Quebec expedition (1775-1776), the author states that he (a Penna rifleman), had both shoes and mocassins.
 

Sharps1863

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As for myself I have to go with the Fugawee wear Hi-Lo's..
Moc's are comfortably, but I have to take care of my feet.
"Diabetic" so it is important for good foot protection and with moc's I'm afraid of sticking something through the sole into my foot. So with the Hi-Lo's I wear some good wool socks and carry a couple of extra pairs in-case the pair I'm wearing gets wet. I know a lot on here take HC/PC to heart but with me It's my well being 1st and foremost. Yes I wear insoles and the boots are hobnailed and heel-plated.
Better to be on the safe side.
 
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