Long hunter leggings questions

Discussion in 'Clothing' started by Barry Stewart, Aug 16, 2017.

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  1. Aug 24, 2017 #41

    54ball

    54ball

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    William Booth Draper is an excellent supplier for wool. Use broadcloth.
    I for mine I used a old olive Army Blanket and died them black with Rit Berrys. Salt was used as the surfactant if memory serves.

    Red leggings were mainly used for Leaders. Some units used red as identity even up to the CW.....Redlegs.

    Most common colors...Navy Blue....Black...Red...Lighter Blues and all others.
    For turkey hunting....black...navy blue if you want PC...
    Browns not really a common color for wool but they are in the realm of possibility.
    If you want brown and have period concerns, consider leather or Anglo/French long gaiters.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 27, 2018
  2. Aug 24, 2017 #42

    Artificer

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    Great answer.

    Dark Blue was such a common color in the colonies in the 18th century that it was part of the reason it was chosen as the preferred color for AWI uniforms. However, as pre War supplies ran out, different shades of medium to dark brown broadcloth were made here for Colony/State Troops.

    Though different shades of green broadcloth was available in the period, it was not nearly as common a color as blue.

    One of the interesting things is that though Green was not a common color, it became the "Uniform Standard" for the Regimental Coats of Continental Marines during the AWI. There is long held story that this came about originally as a shipment of Green Regimentals from Britain and intended for Loyalist Militia here in the Colonies, was captured and that was a main part of the reason that Green was chosen by Marines. However, that Green was a sort of a Kelly Green, not an Olive color.

    Gus
     
  3. Aug 25, 2017 #43

    tenngun

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    A navy blue in the woods will fade in the the background. A dark burgundy likewise fades away. We have a prejudice against od green...but its green. You can dye it with black or navy and get a deep green. Green was worn back then and sold on the frontier but blue and red was far more popular. I have taken turkey in dark blue wool trousers and dark blue duffel coat with a tan knit cap.
     
  4. Aug 26, 2017 #44

    Loyalist Dave

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    You can also either treat colored wool in a bucket of water with iron oxide..., some folks like to make the oxide in a vinegar and water solution which was let sit for a week or two, and then add that to the water, ..., it will "sadden" your color in a lot of cases.

    Other folks will take wool died a bit too bright for them and give it a walnut bath to darken and sadden the color. Why not simply start with a white blanket and do the walnut? Well some folks want to take a blanket they already own, and some folks can't lay their hands on a thick enough white blanket to do the job, but can get a good used blanket already died but too bright to their liking.

    You might consider an inexpensive blanket, then felt it up in the washing machine, to make your leggings (and mits, scarf, or gun over, and maybe a Canadian cap). I'd make the leggings then over-dye them, and see how well that works in the woods, before going for a higher priced piece of cloth, and finding out that doesn't work well enough either. Surplus Blanket

    LD
     
  5. Aug 27, 2017 #45

    Brokennock

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    I'm looking at the Wm. Boothe Draper website. Questioning colors for both "correctness," effectiveness of not standing out in the woods, and balancing both with safety (no red or black in turkey season, no white/buff or deer Brown in deer season). Anyone have any thoughts on the following colors they offer, sheep's black (seems to be a dark charcoal), the 15oz. sky blue (there are two sky blues, I'm looking at the second one) it almost looks like a bluish grey, and the "Kersey" mixed olive/light brown and blue/grey?
    Also, if I were to make 2 pair, one for fall and one for spring, would the "wine" color be acceptable, especially if darkened/"saddened"?
     
  6. Aug 27, 2017 #46

    SgtErv

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    By and large, Wm Booth Draper will not steer you wrong as far as correctness goes. They specify colors and such to their suppliers. If it's not right for a certain period, Paul will tell you straight up. (Paul Dickfoss works there. He is a wealth of information).

    That being said, sometimes they can't get around Belinda that'll contain something like 5% nylon, etc in the broadcloth they obtain. They fully disclose which fabrics contain this. I picked the Navy blue simply because it was a 100% wool.

    You'd be surprised at the range of colors available to colonial people. Wine or sky blue would be fine, imho
     
  7. Sep 8, 2018 #47

    Crewdawg445

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    Also keep in mind wool leggings were more "loose" around ones leg than buckskin. I've made dozens of leggings to give away. Old surplus blankets work wonders when properly dyed. I'm a big fan of HC but paying for wool fabric I'll likely destroy in a season just isn't feasible.
     
  8. Sep 8, 2018 #48

    tenngun

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    We think of camouflage however I recall a painting of Indians at a British fort wearing one red and one blue legging. Both pretty bright.
    Did they wear those in the woods? We read of Indians in the woods with bright colors, and bright colored wool was a popular trade item.
     
  9. Sep 9, 2018 #49

    Crewdawg445

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    They did! I hunt in garb, blue leggings in all.

    I think one also needs to understand they absolutely knew how to be silent and unseen in the forest, even with leggings of blue and red.

    Also, think about how they operated differently in seasons. Summer months, mainly the clout, fall and winter obviously we are clothing ourselves more per environmental conditions. That said, business was conducted differently during those times and clothing had allot to do with it, hunting, raids, war partying down the frontier...
     
  10. Nov 3, 2018 #50

    Toklo Etee

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    Guys, I have enjoyed this thread. If you look at the images of "Indians going a Hunting" by Phillip Von Reck 1736....you can see a Yuchi Hunter of the South East wearing blue Stroud cloth side flap leggings. The blue stroud cloth with a "saved list" dominated the cloth traded to the southern tribes in the early to mid 18th century.
     
  11. Nov 3, 2018 #51

    dgracia

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    They were commonly constructed with just a running stitch although I think I put mine together with a saddle stitch. No welt between the end pieces. Jackets were often sewn with a welt, and sometimes pants, but leggings were considered much simpler and temporary. So, just sew the ends together and leave flat at the side seam. DO NOT cut the flap into fringe!

    I highly recommend pinning the leather in place to follow the shape of your legs. Then remove the leggings and sew from pin to pin. That will give you a decent fit on them. Don't forget to flare them a bit at the bottom where they will meet your mocs, boots, or shoes so they fit over the tops. Most patterns I've seen had the outside come up higher than the inside so you could attach a leather lace from the leggings to the belt, which kept them nicely in place. This was commonly used by Indians with a breechclot and imitated by Virginia Long Hunters and riflemen.

    I'd suggest you take a look at "Recreating the American Longhunter" by Joseph Ruckman. It is well researched and annotated and a comparatively small (65-page) and concise book about reenacting the Longhunter. Here's a link to the book on Townsend's site:
    https://www.townsends.us/recreating-american-longhunter-bk569-p-579.html

    Joseph Ruckman is also one of the moderators of the Rev List and often answers questions posted there.

    Twisted_1in66
    Dan
     
  12. Apr 19, 2019 #52

    Redcoat76

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    To wear leggings over trousers in the 1776-1790 period is to look at how they were made. My trousers I build for my friends and members is based on two types of patterns one pattern is sewn close to fit a little tighter to the calf of the leg getting a little loose around the thigh,these are the drop front trouser these can be worn with buttoned gaiters ending two inches over the knee. Or leggingins of wool cloth ending over the knee with a tie. If you wear loose trousers more materiel needs to come around the calf and will need to be gathered in. Breeches are are always a good bet but with trousers starting to replace them by 1775 gaiters and leggings still being used some adjustments had to be made. But always see what year your imperession you are doing see what patterns are out there.
     
  13. Apr 19, 2019 #53

    Redcoat76

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    Also I read articles and some documentation that long hunters did not always wear buckskin leggings. Using hides cut into there profits. I am sure if they needed it they would use it but use of wool cloth is more common use.
     
  14. Apr 22, 2019 #54

    Toklo Etee

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    The attached picture is of some beater wool leggings I made last year after experimenting with making Stroud cloth. If the wool is soft then they are comfortable to wear.....even in warm weather...... another up side is if they get wet they are more comfortable than my braintan leggings. I patterned the fit of these off the Caldwell leggings.....I omitted the silk ribbon and used a braintan thong to cuff the ankle.....the original leggings were sewn 3/4 of the way down and had hooks & eyes to get the legging to fit tight to the leg ....Caldwell was painted wearing those leggings in a work called "Solidering for the King"...
     

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  15. Apr 23, 2019 #55

    tenngun

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    Even bright colors disappear in the green wood. Dark blue turns green to the eye in very little distance especially against a green background, bright red blends in quickly with the gray-to brown barks of trees.. movement is far more noticeable then color.
     

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