Long hunter frock

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That would depend a lot on one's economic class and location. Colonial America was very much a consumer society, more so than a lot of folks into this "hobby" want to admit. But there were some folks as one got further into the lands of the western frontier that wore clothing mostly made at home by wives, daughters, maybe even sisters and mothers. They would still buy what they could when they could and it didn't take long for fabric and clothing to head west with traders and merchants.
Just to add to your knowledge base, there were traveling weavers who would move from town to town doing the weaving for these families. Having a home loom would have been a huge expense that most on the frontier could not afford. The families would do the spinning for a year, if they raised sheep or flax, and then bring their skeins to the weaver. He would create the cloth to their specifications and in return would take money or a portion of the skeins for his own weaving and selling of cloth.
 

Brokennock

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Just to add to your knowledge base, there were traveling weavers who would move from town to town doing the weaving for these families. Having a home loom would have been a huge expense that most on the frontier could not afford. The families would do the spinning for a year, if they raised sheep or flax, and then bring their skeins to the weaver. He would create the cloth to their specifications and in return would take money or a portion of the skeins for his own weaving and selling of cloth.
Thank you.
Would a portable loom be able to make cloth the same with a one built to stay in place?
What did it take to move one of these looms around and set them up?

As always, I appreciate your input.
 
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Traditionally 18th C looms wove a 24-36" wide piece of cloth. The average footprint of an 18th C loom is close to the size of a double bed. Compared to todays looms, I have one that does 36" and one that does 42"

They would weave in panels and stitch them together to create a wider piece of fabric.

I suspect, but cant prove, that the traveling looms would have been small enough to fit into a wagon as is, or be broken down into easy to assemble pieces. There is also the possibility that a weaver would have an arrangement with a local owner to use their loom in exchange for cloth.

Barn looms, basically stationary looms, were much larger height wise (called the castle) but not necessarily width wise. They were called barn looms because their size made them difficult to fit into a standard house, thus they were put into a loft or side room of a barn.

Weaving was primarily a male occupation due to the guild system in the UK at the time. A weaver who immigrated prob found very good work at that time.

From an 18th C history page Hand Weaving
"Weavers were a universally popular element of the community. The travelling weaver was, like all other itinerant tradesmen of the day, a welcome newsmonger; and the weaver who took in weaving was often a stationary gossip, and gathered inquiring groups in his loom-room; even children loved to go to his door to beg for bits of colored yarn--thrums--which they used in their play, and also tightly braided to wear as shoestrings, hair-laces, etc."
 

Brokennock

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Traditionally 18th C looms wove a 24-36" wide piece of cloth. The average footprint of an 18th C loom is close to the size of a double bed. Compared to todays looms, I have one that does 36" and one that does 42"

They would weave in panels and stitch them together to create a wider piece of fabric.

I suspect, but cant prove, that the traveling looms would have been small enough to fit into a wagon as is, or be broken down into easy to assemble pieces. There is also the possibility that a weaver would have an arrangement with a local owner to use their loom in exchange for cloth.

Barn looms, basically stationary looms, were much larger height wise (called the castle) but not necessarily width wise. They were called barn looms because their size made them difficult to fit into a standard house, thus they were put into a loft or side room of a barn.

Weaving was primarily a male occupation due to the guild system in the UK at the time. A weaver who immigrated prob found very good work at that time.

From an 18th C history page Hand Weaving
"Weavers were a universally popular element of the community. The travelling weaver was, like all other itinerant tradesmen of the day, a welcome newsmonger; and the weaver who took in weaving was often a stationary gossip, and gathered inquiring groups in his loom-room; even children loved to go to his door to beg for bits of colored yarn--thrums--which they used in their play, and also tightly braided to wear as shoestrings, hair-laces, etc."
Thank you again.
 

brewyak

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I ordered this at the show at Ft Fredrick. The lady did a really good job and her price can’t be beat. Her and her husband were wonderful to deal with. She also makes clothing for Mt Vernon. Called Ft Downing. It’s made out of un dyed linen. Then I dyed it with blk walnut dye that I made
 

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flconch53

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Neal Hurst's thesis includes pictures of the very few surviving hunting shirts. Not one is a pull over smock. Can't find even one period description that would leave one to see a hunting shirt as being a simple frock or smock.

Try a Google search for, Neal Hurst, A Different Kind Of Armor.
The dates on those would be post rev war. I thought the original topic was 1760's
 

flconch53

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Ok now you are using modern options for primary source. Missy Clark is my former wife and our research is not the same. Anybody that knows her knows she carried a thick note book around with many primary source documents on this subject.
 
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Traditionally 18th C looms wove a 24-36" wide piece of cloth. The average footprint of an 18th C loom is close to the size of a double bed. Compared to todays looms, I have one that does 36" and one that does 42"

They would weave in panels and stitch them together to create a wider piece of fabric.
It’s hard to weave wider than a yard when you’re tossing the shuttle by hand, Brokennock! That’s why even blankets, tents, and sails were pieced. This is an antique 4-harness counterbalance loom we installed in the Farmhouse at the American Revolution Museum at Yorktown when I was running the site. My assistant had apprenticed to the trade in Williamsburg, and taught me everything I know about weaving.
Jay
9A249287-D729-41A2-8079-9290106C1E52.jpeg
 

DixieTexian

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Unfortunately, there is no real affordable linsey woolsey being made these days. I searched and found one hand weaver who makes it, but it is something like $60 a yard. Far too expensive for anyone who also has to feed those little cretins we call children these days. My wife's dad has a place down in Central Mexico where he grew up that isn't too far from a town where they make and sell lots of handwoven wool blankets and such. They also have plenty of linen garments for sale. I've thought about asking around to see if I could find someone to weave some linsey woolsey fabric for me, but have never had the time when we've been down there.
 
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