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Ha Ha! Take a look at the bullets. They appear to be brass jacketed.
B-Westerns, where they always have a neat row of cartridges on the belt; then roll around in fights, fall, etc., cartridges were costly back then, they wouldn't want to bend or disfigure the rounds. Also, they almost always wear guns low-slung, like fast-draw guys. Everyday people didn't go around with a heavy belt & gun wearing at their thighs all day. Even the excellent Quigley movie had his rolling on his back with those huge cartridges which would have been mis-shapen. Just sayin' .
 

Hawk54

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Found a website on the guns of the movie.
Lee switches from shooting a '51 to a '58 during the movie.
Tuco and Clint carry '51's that at various times lose the loading lever. Tuco changes pistols during the shooting scene where he's taking a bath.
As for Lee's missing finger tip, it apparently happened while he was making a tree-house for his kid.
Watched the movie today. One scene Tuco is loading cartridges into his pistol. Look at all the foreign rifles and bayonets carried by the union troops in the bridge scene.
 

Hawk54

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B-Westerns, where they always have a neat row of cartridges on the belt; then roll around in fights, fall, etc., cartridges were costly back then, they wouldn't want to bend or disfigure the rounds. Also, they almost always wear guns low-slung, like fast-draw guys. Everyday people didn't go around with a heavy belt & gun wearing at their thighs all day. Even the excellent Quigley movie had his rolling on his back with those huge cartridges which would have been mis-shapen. Just sayin' .
Look at the movie the Undefeated with John Wayne and Rock Hudson. It takes place months after the civil war and they are carrying 1873 Colts and Winchesters. The rebs have 1873 trapdoors. A huge number of movies with cavalry in them have the troopers carrying Winchesters. The US Cavalry was never issued Winchesters. Trapdoor carbines were the issue long arm until bolt actions were adopted.
 

toot

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Watched the movie today. One scene Tuco is loading cartridges into his pistol. Look at all the foreign rifles and bayonets carried by the union troops in the bridge scene.
can you post the seen, I am interested in seeing it. thanks.
 

N.Y. Yankee

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Other than the obvious mistakes of everyone always having an 1873 Colt and firing a 6-shooter 67 times without reloading, My favorite mistakes are guys "shooting" someone without cocking the single action first or someone always throwing their gun down in the dirt. Inevitably, someone else picks it up and continues shooting another 67 more shots without having to clean the sand out of it.
 

Dark Angel

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True, but Josh's cut-down rifle was not a .45-70; it was just a normal .44-40. Remember the toy rigs you could get as a kid?
Other than the obvious mistakes of everyone always having an 1873 Colt and firing a 6-shooter 67 times without reloading, My favorite mistakes are guys "shooting" someone without cocking the single action first or someone always throwing their gun down in the dirt. Inevitably, someone else picks it up and continues shooting another 67 more shots without having to clean the sand out of it.
Example, Clint Eastwood's character shooting John Russell's character 6 times with his Remington and never once cocks his weapon. To do that, they should have used Webley's 'self-indexing' (automatically cocked itself after each shot,) revolver in that scene.
 

jimhallam

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Example, Clint Eastwood's character shooting John Russell's character 6 times with his Remington and never once cocks his weapon. To do that, they should have used Webley's 'self-indexing' (automatically cocked itself after each shot,) revolver in that scene.
One of my specialist areas is "Webley" --- and the only "self-indexing" one that I can think of is the Fosbery -- - which is WELL into the unmentionable category. (Actually it is the only top-break Webley which is now importable into the USA without modification, as all the others fail the BATF&E's "hammer drop safety test").
 

Eutycus

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he has a MOD. 1892 that was never chambered in 30/30. JUST 38/40 & 44/40!
In one episode Lucas McCain did say it was a 44-40. I admired some of his feats but that caliber was just not that accurate, was it? Even if he was that good,the rifle wouldn't have been. Plus he would have been deaf by the time he was 40 (and broke) to have practiced that much.
 

Jason60chev

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can you post the seen, I am interested in seeing it. thanks.
There are a couple of scenes......
In the store, where Tuco takes apart pistols and puts one together that he likes. He asks for cartridges. You do not directly see him loading them into the cylinder, but he makes the motion. You do not really see the back end of the cylinder, either, to see that it is percussion.

At the river, where Tuco and Blondie are talking while the attack is going on, Tuco seems to be loading his revolver
with cartridges.

In the final showdown, there is a close up of Angle Eyes' Remington. You can see that it is a caplock revolver, yet he has cartridges in his belt.

Blondie's revolver.....in the scene at the hotel, where he is cleaning, is the only revolver actual seen having cartridges loaded into it.
 

Jason60chev

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Other than the obvious mistakes of everyone always having an 1873 Colt and firing a 6-shooter 67 times without reloading, My favorite mistakes are guys "shooting" someone without cocking the single action first or someone always throwing their gun down in the dirt. Inevitably, someone else picks it up and continues shooting another 67 more shots without having to clean the sand out of it.
In the Movie Open Range....the final gun battle, I swear Kevin Coster fires 9.....Nine......N I N E,,,,,,,shots from his revolver and there is NOT a cut in the sequence.
 

Jim

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In the Movie Open Range....the final gun battle, I swear Kevin Coster fires 9.....Nine......N I N E,,,,,,,shots from his revolver and there is NOT a cut in the sequence.

Now, THAT is what I used to call, the John Wayne load!
It was in his movies, that I first noticed his Colt’s had the ability to never run out of ammo!

Now, of course, it’s Hickok 45’s calling loading only five in the cylinder that constitutes the “John Wayne Load.”
 
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Tuco disassembles some '51's, appears to look THROUGH the cylinder, examines an obvious '51 barrel (with loading lever), and finally reassembles a pistol from the parts. Tuco breaks open a box of cartridges and then proceeds to load up the '51 with cartridges (you can see the metal cartridges on the table and in his hand). As everyone has noted, it's a bit ahead of it's time in pistol technology, but nonetheless. it is STILL my favorite spaghetti western.

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Movie prop guns - my main source of aggravation on westerns - are there for "appearance" and not for accuracy. My squeeze gets much less tired of me pointing out these errors than she has a right to get. I mostly try to ignore these things, but some can be so egregious that they require being pointed out.
Enjoying fiction involves the willing suspension of disbelief.
 
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