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Lock to stock fit question.

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bhamlin52

32 Cal
Joined
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Location
Macomb Twp, MI
The attached image it shows a cutout in the stock for the hammer, Do original Kentucky Pistol have this feature. I find it ugly as hell. Is there any way of fixing it?

kentucky-maple-pistol-flintlock-model.png
 
This is rarely seen on originals. Typically on originals the wood beside the tang is almost at a 45 degree slope following the shape of the diagonal barrel flats. In addition, lock panels are often very narrow. Together these architectural features make the cutout unnecessary.
 
The attached image it shows a cutout in the stock for the hammer, Do original Kentucky Pistol have this feature. I find it ugly as hell. Is there any way of fixing it?

View attachment 277576
Yes, you can “fix it”. It would require stripping the wood bare, gluing a small bit of matching wood into the notch and reworking the panel down like Rich noted. There are excellent visual tutorials on the forum on shaping the lock panels.
 
Hi,
As Bob and Rich mentioned, you can fix it and I don't even think it requires gluing in any wood but you will have to reshape the lock area and finish it again. The notch is so the shoulder on the flintcock (it is not called a hammer) can rest on the thick upper edge of the lock plate. The solution is to thin the flats all the way around the lock and angle the top surface of the stock by the barrel tang down usually so that the surface is almost flush the the flats on the barrel. Then taper the flat along the top of the lock inward where your notch already is until the notch disappears. Here you can see the top of the stock by the lock shaped to be almost flush with the barrel and you can see part of the top edge of the lock plate exposed to by tapering the side in a little toward the barrel.
5iRXddK.jpg

A5CsJmU.jpg


That eliminates any need for the notch.

dave
 
I always wondered why CVA did not make their tumbler inside the lock rest on something to stop the hammer fall, instead of needing this ugly cutout for the thick hammer. If one is not careful, there can be an open crack at the top of the lockplate/stock joint where firing residue can enter lockworks.
 
Traditional quality locks also have the travel stop on the cock. Having only an internal stop woule get beat up in normal use.

The modern stocks have a grossly oversized molding. If the lock is round faced then and the molding is thin you may not need any wood cut out at all. On a flat face lock a wood cut out may be necessary. If it is done carefully and minimally it is hard to spot. The lock molding looks much better if it is really thin, maybe 1/8".
 
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This flintlock is a Pedersoli kit so I can work the stock without a problem. I think I can let the lock sit a little proud of the stock and it will be fine. My kit doesn't have as much of a cutout as this picture shows.
 
I have a question on a build I've been working on for some time means it's my first one I've built and I'm learning that slow is the best way to go because if you take too much off you can't put it back
With that being said, I'm to the point to where I'm matching everything up and I've run across an issued where I cannot figure out what is wrong or what I'm doing wrong. But I got the dual trigger assembly set in and by itself works good. And I have an l&r lock assembly by itself. Works good. When I set the two together in the stock they do not want to cooperate with each other and function as they should. What am I overlooking or missing? Any help or advice greatly appreciated..
 

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The wood. If each works by itself and doesn’t when they are put in the stock then they are not in proper relationship with each other or the wood is interfering with one or both. Try one at a time in the stock, if each work the it’s the position between them.
 
The wood. If each works by itself and doesn’t when they are put in the stock then they are not in proper relationship with each other or the wood is interfering with one or both. Try one at a time in the stock, if each work the it’s the position between them.
Yes I had thought that so I had tried the lock mechanism in the stock and I've tried the trigger mechanism in the stock. Both work and then I even decided to take out a little more inside just to make sure everything had clearance and wasn't touching or rubbing and then marked each part and put it in to see if it was touching any wood. Everything was clean, no marks
But when you put them both together in the stock and then you try to utilize the half cock and then pull the set trigger. Nothing will happen. Go to full clock. Nothing will happen but you can pull on the trigger and it'll fire like a single trigger but it is very stiff at that time to pull it as well
 
Hi,
As Bob and Rich mentioned, you can fix it and I don't even think it requires gluing in any wood but you will have to reshape the lock area and finish it again. The notch is so the shoulder on the flintcock (it is not called a hammer) can rest on the thick upper edge of the lock plate. The solution is to thin the flats all the way around the lock and angle the top surface of the stock by the barrel tang down usually so that the surface is almost flush the the flats on the barrel. Then taper the flat along the top of the lock inward where your notch already is until the notch disappears. Here you can see the top of the stock by the lock shaped to be almost flush with the barrel and you can see part of the top edge of the lock plate exposed to by tapering the side in a little toward the barrel.
5iRXddK.jpg

A5CsJmU.jpg


That eliminates any need for the notch.

dave
That looks really good. Thanks for the tip.
 
The attached image it shows a cutout in the stock for the hammer, Do original Kentucky Pistol have this feature. I find it ugly as hell. Is there any way of fixing it?

View attachment 277576
A plate notch is not a standard feature of every gun, some have them and some don’t.

It really depends on whether it’s needed or not, personally i try to avoid notching the panel, as it really weakens that area and its ugly.
 

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