Lock lubrication?

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When reassembling a flintlock lock (in my case, a Kibler smr ketland), What have you found to be a good oil or grease? I have 3in one oil on hand and red grease, also a grease listed for use on muzzleloaders or choke tubes. I know either one will work, but is there any experience with good or bad with these?

Thank you
 
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In fifty years, my favorite lock lube has proven to be what is closest at hand. o_O Actually, I, and my locks are not fussy. I have used everything from WD-40 to bear grease, whale oil and others. However, I seem to lean towards 'Break Free' with Teflon. Several of these locks have been used countless thousands of times in that period with no failures or signs of wear.
 

ADK Bigfoot

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If it rotates, oil it. If it slides, grease it.

After I thoroughly clean my locks, I rinse them in HOT water, then blow them dry. Then I spray with WD40, then blow them dry (gets any hidden water out.) Wipe any excess off. Then I put a drop of oil in the lockworks (tumbler, etc.) and I place red grease between the nose of the frizzen and the frizzen spring. Operate the lock a few times before reassembly in the rifle to work the oil and grease in.

The only time I have had a lock get funky on me was on a woods walk when I had not greased the frizzen/spring contact point and the frizzen would not open fully. Fixed in seconds and never looked back.

ADK Bigfoot
 
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The only time I have had a lock get funky on me was on a woods walk when I had not greased the frizzen/spring contact point and the frizzen would not open fully. Fixed in seconds and never looked back.
Once I bought a rifle that was so worn from no grease that the frizzen toe had worn a groove in the top of the frizzen spring. A trip to my lock fixing buddy(the lock had other problems) took care of it, but he thought I did it and scolded me for letting a lock get like that. ;)
 

TDM

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I use a light application of Birchwood Casey RIG grease on the working surfaces if the lock. I also apply a thin coat of RIG to the underside of pinned barrels. And its recommended for swabbing the inside of the barrel if your going to store the gun for a while. Use a little on the trigger assembly too.
 
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I use a light application of Birchwood Casey RIG grease on the working surfaces if the lock. I also apply a thin coat of RIG to the underside of pinned barrels. And its recommended for swabbing the inside of the barrel if your going to store the gun for a while. Use a little on the trigger assembly too.
That sounds like words of wisdom, thank you.
 
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After cleaning(doesn't everyone remove their lock as part of cleaning?), I use lithium grease(but any grease will work) and a toothpick to poke it in places. No oil. Over time oil will run off and get in the wood. G96 in the barrel.
Nothing worse than old darkened oil staining in a wood stock...
 

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Just be AWARE that RIG gun grease is a ‘preservative’ grease and not a ‘lubricating’ grease …

RIG = Rust Inhibiting Grease
Flint62 is correct, RIG is labeled as a rust and corrosion preventative grease. But I've had no problems using it, sparingly, on the tumbler, sear, and trigger group. But its certainly not the only option.
And if your working parts are well polished a few drops of oil; ballistol, 3 in 1, artificial sperm whale oil, or what have you will work fine. As stated, I still like a little grease on sliding parts.
 
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Brokennock

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Flint62 is correct, RIG is labeled as a rust and corrosion preventative grease. But I've had no problems using it, sparingly, on the tumbler, sear, and trigger group. But its certainly not the only option.
And if your working parts are well polished a few drops of oil; ballistol, 3 in 1, artificial sperm whale oil, or what have you will work fine. As stated, I still like a little grease on sliding parts.
RIG does also make their "+P stainless grease."
Made to prevent galling when stainless steel is sliding against stainless steel. But I've had good luck with it on carbon steel.
I don't however use it on my flintlocks.
 
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I am team ballistol. I use it on everything from knives to my un-mentionable Sharps. I haven't found anything better in a single can. Ive done some blockheaded stuff with guns (not safety wise lol), and despite all the bangs, Knicks, and scratches, not one of my guns has rust. That's no rust with plenty of humid or pouring rain days in the deer stand. It works great as both a metal preservative and lube for me. I always wipe the inside of my locks (lightly) with it after cleaned, and leave an ever so slight "film" layer down my barrel that I swab out next prior to my next shooting session. As an added bonus (as much as these things can be determined), Ballistol is non-toxic. The Germans have been using it since before World War One. Hickok45 claims he puts it on mosquito bites but that is a use I am most likely not going to try. But if Ballistol is good enough for Hickok I say it is good enough for us 😂
 
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This will go over like a lead balloon here........


I tip up all my bottles of liquid lubricant in a trough system with a collector bottle at the bottom. Quite frankly exactly as my father did. He used the 'drippings' as a general lubricant in a squirt gun. I do the same and use it on my locks and other gun parts among other things. It consists of 0w-16, 0w-20, 5w-20, sae30 (with detergent), 10w-30, 15w-40, 75w-85, 80w-90, and 00 liquid grease (also the odd transmission fluid quart, power steering fluid and who knows what else!!). Both synthetic and conventional. It has the consistency of maybe 30 weight oil. The 00 liquid grease really helps thicken the 0w-16 and 0w-20. It has been a darn fine lubricant over the years on locks, triggers, centerfire/rimfire bolts, pistols, revolvers, hinges, etc, etc, etc. And it's all been 'free'!

I should add that this is after you have changed your engine oil or what have you and you take the 'empties' and leave them tipped up for a week or so. You'd be surprised at how much 'drips' out!
 
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I have a classic mess in my shop , just now. I was shocked , when I removed the lock bolts from the side plate. The internals were a mass of rust ,though the owner says , he fired the 30 yr. old expensive custom longrifle once , a week ago. The complaint was , now the lock won't stay at full cock position.
I disassembled , and power wire brushed and polished each lock part , The only parts not rusted , were the fly , the mainspring , and hammer. Lubrication ,reassembly , and testing of the lock , was successful , but the flint was too long , and was replaced.
The lock mortise was charred black , denoting the wood stock had shrunk ,and the precision flint lock inlet , needed to be inlet slightly deeper to allow the lock plate bolster , to fit tightly against the barrel , sealing the hot ignition gasses , away from the wood in the lock mortise. The single trigger has no free play when the lock is at full cock , and when the rifle butt is bumped om the floor , the lock fires. This condition is obviously unacceptable and dangerous. I was called away , and cant work on the rifle , just now. I will check the clearance of the sear arm in it's inlet hole , and unpin the single trigger, and remove just enough wood to allow the trigger a small amount of free play , so the lock can be safely cocked completely with a small free play in the trigger motion. All should work , OK.
Will tutor the owner on proper lock maintenance , and cleaning procedure , though I doubt it will do any good. .....................oldwood
 
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