Loading cylinders using a press

Help Support Muzzle Loading Forum:

Throwdown58

40 Cal
MLF Supporter
Joined
Feb 5, 2021
Messages
219
Reaction score
96
Yea of course we have all seen the effects of recoil on things staying put and getting beat up. I just think you might be on to something that I had not considered. You have to figure that Colt would have made guns out of cheaper and easier to work materials if there was ultimately no difference, but they didn't. It makes me wonder if all these years when I have seen people inquire about guns that used to work and now aren't if possibly the pin is out of true, or the breech face is uneven and now it's rubbing or catching. I personally have had no problems, and I have shot my plated brass frame Piettas a good deal SASS shooting, but mostly the Rems, not the Colts. I think you have a strong argument.
 

Rfp10000

36 Cl.
Joined
Jan 23, 2021
Messages
73
Reaction score
15
Load with a press for over 30 years, Especially the replica colts. but occasionally in the field off ram rod. I carry a 58 on the farm daily. Usually have an extra loaded cylinder along for the ride.
Do you carry the extra cylinder capped ? I see no problem carrying the cylinder in and hammer on either an empty chamber or one of the safe slots on the NMA if it’s capped but the spare cylinder seems too easy to drop to be capped.
 

Throwdown58

40 Cal
MLF Supporter
Joined
Feb 5, 2021
Messages
219
Reaction score
96
I have not carried a cap and ball revolver for self defence in over 10 years. And when I did it was a snubby 1860 army that cabelas used to sell that is slightly different from the one available today.. I never had second cylinder
 

M. De Land

75 Cal.
Joined
Dec 25, 2011
Messages
6,130
Reaction score
632
I think the breech face takes its beating from loading. On firing, anything loose (or suspended -like a cylinder) moves foreward, slams into barrel face, and that stresses the wedge fitment. Ever seen a loose scope or barrel band move towards the butt?
When the hammer drops it pushes the cylinder forward and in open top guns the barrel is the cylinder stop. At discharge the cylinder is slammed rearward and this is what imprints the ratchet star into the breech face of brass framed guns. This is one of the reasons to limit the barrel gap which keeps cylinder movement to a minimum.
 

sawyer04

50 Cal.
MLF Supporter
Joined
Feb 3, 2013
Messages
1,180
Reaction score
713
Location
missouri
Do you carry the extra cylinder capped ? I see no problem carrying the cylinder in and hammer on either an empty chamber or one of the safe slots on the NMA if it’s capped but the spare cylinder seems too easy to drop to be capped.
I have carried both ways, capped and not capped. I have never used or needed the extra cylinder in a carry situation. Back in time I had two plots that were in a hundred mile spread and carried provisions for at least three days. I have had the extra cylinder draw moisture and not fire. I carry in a cylinder holster.
As far as the hammer riding on an empty chamber, I always carry on empty chamber, unless I am playing with targets, ( seldom) then I fill the dead mans chamber.
Do I need the extra cylinder now: probably not, just looks cool.:D
 

Throwdown58

40 Cal
MLF Supporter
Joined
Feb 5, 2021
Messages
219
Reaction score
96
The hammer can be let down between cylinders and the gun will index properly when cocked. The Rems actually have a slot for the hammer to rid in that is absolutely secure. Most Colt copies have a dimple that the hammer catches on, which I have never seen fall out. I shot five shot Pattersons for over two years nearly ever weekend in SASS back in the early days, and have never had even the question of an issue when dropping the hammer between cylinders. It is perfectly safe.

Even the SAA copies have a small cocking notch that keeps the hammer about 1/4" off the frame and the firing pin secure unless the hammer is brought to full cock. The whole empty cylinder thing was a pure invention of the nannies that was not required. They are just afraid of what their sick tiny little minds envision could happen if... Well that's every day of existence. Life is a dangerous place. It is always about feeling superior and better than others. That is why they created those foolish number RO courses. Because they knew that egos will make them a lot of money, and it has.
 

M. De Land

75 Cal.
Joined
Dec 25, 2011
Messages
6,130
Reaction score
632
The hammer can be let down between cylinders and the gun will index properly when cocked. The Rems actually have a slot for the hammer to rid in that is absolutely secure. Most Colt copies have a dimple that the hammer catches on, which I have never seen fall out. I shot five shot Pattersons for over two years nearly ever weekend in SASS back in the early days, and have never had even the question of an issue when dropping the hammer between cylinders. It is perfectly safe.

Even the SAA copies have a small cocking notch that keeps the hammer about 1/4" off the frame and the firing pin secure unless the hammer is brought to full cock. The whole empty cylinder thing was a pure invention of the nannies that was not required. They are just afraid of what their sick tiny little minds envision could happen if... Well that's every day of existence. Life is a dangerous place. It is always about feeling superior and better than others. That is why they created those foolish number RO courses. Because they knew that egos will make them a lot of money, and it has.
Your accusation of "nannyism" (people who take safety seriously) actually is pure projection from a cowboy attitude of being the tough guy that no one is going to tell what to do! Yawn , impressive to no one and foolishness to most!
 

Throwdown58

40 Cal
MLF Supporter
Joined
Feb 5, 2021
Messages
219
Reaction score
96
Yea I figured you would reconsider your nature cuz I made so much sense. Said no nanny ever.
 

hawkeye2

58 Cal.
Joined
Apr 12, 2004
Messages
4,249
Reaction score
1,293
Location
Winchester, VA
M. De Land I took quite a bit of offense at being called a "nanny" and for the first time in my 17 years on this forum I have blocked someone. I did that to protect myself before I lit into someone and got myself thrown off the forum. While I may not always agree with every post and honestly have been a little upset by some everyone has a right to their opinion. May I respectfully suggest you ignore the bait the next time it's cast, I know I will.
 

M. De Land

75 Cal.
Joined
Dec 25, 2011
Messages
6,130
Reaction score
632
M. De Land I took quite a bit of offense at being called a "nanny" and for the first time in my 17 years on this forum I have blocked someone. I did that to protect myself before I lit into someone and got myself thrown off the forum. While I may not always agree with every post and honestly have been a little upset by some everyone has a right to their opinion. May I respectfully suggest you ignore the bait the next time it's cast, I know I will.
I'm not upset or offended, just telling the truth and defending the safe use of fire arms, admittedly a bit direct and perhaps brash at times.
 

SDSmlf

40 Cal.
Joined
Nov 4, 2006
Messages
3,218
Reaction score
2,272
Location
Western North Carolina
M. De Land I took quite a bit of offense at being called a "nanny" and for the first time in my 17 years on this forum I have blocked someone. I did that to protect myself before I lit into someone and got myself thrown off the forum. While I may not always agree with every post and honestly have been a little upset by some everyone has a right to their opinion. May I respectfully suggest you ignore the bait the next time it's cast, I know I will.
Kind of new at this, only being around for 15 years or so, but find folks come and go, with many wearing out their welcome before introductions are complete. Some tend to step on their own equipment as they blast out their posts. Actually find it somewhat entertaining as they self destruct. No point putting them in any lead box as they quickly disappear.
I never had second cylinder
And I do carry extra cylinders with my Remingtons.
 

Throwdown58

40 Cal
MLF Supporter
Joined
Feb 5, 2021
Messages
219
Reaction score
96
Yeah in my experience the longevity on these boards is limited to those with a very narrow overall breadth and depth. This is one of the longest I've lasted lol. If you bothered to actually read rather than just make a point, you would have noticed that I never had a second cylinder for my snubbie carry gun. Those of us on here who actually own and shoot cap and ball pistols, and who aren't just here because it makes is feel like we have a purpose in life, know that the only snubbie that has been on the market for many years is a Colt copy, which is what an 1860 army is. I did not say that I carry capped cylinders for my Rems, because as I explained, I have not carried a gun for self defense in a very long time. There would be no reason to carry capped cylinders unless it were for self defense, due to the risk of accident with them, and I don't believe anyone here suggested otherwise. Nobody even said that they would carry them around SASS matches instead of capping at the loading table.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

M. De Land

75 Cal.
Joined
Dec 25, 2011
Messages
6,130
Reaction score
632
Yeah in my experience the longevity on these boards is limited to those with a very narrow overall breadth and depth. This is one of the longest I've lasted lol. If you bothered to actually read rather than just make a point, you would have noticed that I never had a second cylinder for my snubbie carry gun. Those of us on here who actually own and shoot cap and ball pistols, and who aren't just here because it makes is feel like we have a purpose in life, know that the only snubbie that has been on the market for many years is a Colt copy, which is what an 1860 army is. I did not say that I carry capped cylinders for my Rems, because as I explained, I have not carried a gun for self defense in a very long time. There would be no reason to carry capped cylinders unless it were for self defense, due to the risk of accident with them, and I don't believe anyone here suggested otherwise. Nobody even said that they would carry them around SASS matches instead of capping at the loading table.
It would be wise to stop digging your hole at this point. Capped and charged loose cylinders are just not a safe option for any purpose out of the gun.
 

GomezMunoz1951

Pilgrim
Joined
Nov 13, 2013
Messages
76
Reaction score
67
I bought 4 small loading lever contraptions back years ago. Two for .44, one for .36, and one for .31. There is a small metal pin that the cylinder fits on and the handle has a plunger on a swivel. You can load a cylinder fairly fast with them. I have 3 Pietta .44 Remington revolvers and a .44 Uberti Remington revolver and a little .31 Pietta Remington pocket revolver. I used to have a couple of Pietta Remington .36 but like a dummy sold them. I have 13 spare cylinders for the Pietta Remington .44's so I can load and shoot for quite some time. I want to buy several Uberti Remington .44 cylinders. I made my own cylinder pouches and can do a "Pale Rider" reload quite fast. When I shot in NCOWS I didn't use the cylinder pouches since they were not historically correct, when I shot in SASS they didn't care but I couldn't carry them capped. When I go out desert wandering I carry 4 cylinders capped and ready. I also have two .45 LC Conversion cylinders for the Pietta Remington's and keep two loaded and ready as defense back ups in my house. If I carry one of the Pietta's with the conversion cylinder, I have the other loaded and in my cylinder pouch, the small cartridge box is full of .45's.
 

GomezMunoz1951

Pilgrim
Joined
Nov 13, 2013
Messages
76
Reaction score
67
What is your reference for changing cylinders to reload back in the day? Have read they may have carried multiple revolvers, but didn’t carry spare cylinders. If they were extra cylinders for swapping one would expect numerous loose individual cylinders to be found on battlefields, though that doesn’t seem to be the case. Except maybe on the set of Pale Rider or an old Bonanza episode. Also curious why period pistol boxes never seem to have a spot for ‘those extra’ cylinders?
I am quite fascinated by the Missouri Partisan Rangers and have read up on everything I could find. According to what I have read, they not only carried a number of revolvers but their shirts had large pockets that they carried spare cylinders. Not having anyone who actually lived during that time handy, it is one of those things we might never know for sure if it is true or not...
 

M. De Land

75 Cal.
Joined
Dec 25, 2011
Messages
6,130
Reaction score
632
I am quite fascinated by the Missouri Partisan Rangers and have read up on everything I could find. According to what I have read, they not only carried a number of revolvers but their shirts had large pockets that they carried spare cylinders. Not having anyone who actually lived during that time handy, it is one of those things we might never know for sure if it is true or not...
Ask yourself this question, would you walk around with the hammer down on a charged and capped chamber while in the holster? Carring charged and capped cylinders , even in individual compartments is in the same danger realm because they have to be removed and handled before they are put into the gun after which fumbling or dropping the loaded gun is not likely to cause an accidental discharge, the hammer being positioned on a safe pin ,notch or empty chamber.
 

Eutycus

62 Cal.
Joined
Nov 10, 2018
Messages
2,941
Reaction score
1,188
Location
South Texas
I've only seen the mention of a brass framed revolver once on this thread. That is probably the main reason I use a press. I think eventually the frames of all brassers stretch somewhat but why speed up the process by using a little too much force on the loading lever. So I use a press and get a little more life out of the gun.Maybe it's all in my head but I feel I'm extending it somewhat.
 

jdesro

36 Cl.
Joined
Nov 8, 2020
Messages
76
Reaction score
79
I've only seen the mention of a brass framed revolver once on this thread. That is probably the main reason I use a press. I think eventually the frames of all brassers stretch somewhat but why speed up the process by using a little too much force on the loading lever. So I use a press and get a little more life out of the gun.Maybe it's all in my head but I feel I'm extending it somewhat.
I agree completely with your line of thinking here. It would seem to me that loading a tight fitting ball with a brass framed revolvers loading lever would but a lot of stress on the point where a hard steel arbor is screwed into a relatively soft brass frame. I have a few brass frame revolvers, and this is one of the main reasons I got a press.

Even with the Colt style revolvers, it takes less than 30 seconds to disassemble it to remove the cylinder for loading with a press, and I find it easier and faster to load the cylinder on the press compared to loading it on the revolver. I rarely use the revolvers loading lever anymore.
 

Throwdown58

40 Cal
MLF Supporter
Joined
Feb 5, 2021
Messages
219
Reaction score
96
Which press do you use? I have seen the traditions press, which doesn't look very robust, and the powderinc one, which I haven't bought yet. There also seem to be two versions there.
 
Top