leather to hold the flint

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Jaeger

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Buckskin leather. I started out using scrap leather in my flintlocks, then read on line that lead was supposed to offer better sparking. From my observations I don't see that it does. What it does do is loose its grip on the flint after several firings and requires retightening of the screw. After getting tired having loose flints fall out I went back to leather but this time using buckskin leather from deer hides I have tanned. It grips extremely well and I never have to retighten the jaws.
I agree 100% with Tom. I use the thinner leather from an old pair of leather gloves. I had the exact same experience with lead.
 

Banjoman

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I’ve been using the same piece of real leather (from a glove) in my Fusil for three years. It doesn’t take a lot to have several years worth of leather. One glove yields quite a bit. You could buy one pair of leather gloves at a hardware store and have enough leather for several guns many years.

After thinking it over, I don’t know if the “synthetic “ stuff would work very well because of the heat generated in the pan.
 

Notchy Bob

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When orienting the flint in the jaws, whether leather or lead is used, I see some have the flat edge up and some have it down. Is there any reason that one orientation is better than the other?
Bevel up, or bevel down? That's a question that gets tossed around a lot. It is a very good question, though. I think the bottom line would be to try both, and see which sparks the best and optimizes the life of the flint in your lock.

For the record, I put the bevel up, and the flat side down. I sent two locks to Brad Emig to be tuned up several years ago, and he took the trouble to call me and discuss this. He recommended flat side down, because flints vary in thickness. If you place the bevel down, different flints will strike the frizzen in different places, higher or lower, depending on the thickness of the flint. With the flat side down, the sharp edge of the flint will strike the frizzen in about the same place every time, regardless of the thickness of the flint. Brad felt this consistency was important, as part of his lock tune-up regimen is balancing the springs.

One would think that the flint striking the frizzen higher, with the bevel down, would give a longer "scrape" and more sparks, and also distribute wear on the frizzen better. However, I have followed Brad's advice and have enjoyed very good results. I'm stickin' with it. He is, after all, the "Lock Doctor."

Best regards,

Notchy Bob
 

flntlokr

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What does one use to hold the flint in the cock,(hammer)?
About 20 years ago, I cut a worn-out moccasin into right-size pieces, and haven't run out yet. Leather needs to be about 1/16" thick, and soft enough to wrap tightly, with a hole cut in the center so that the flint can be set back in contact with the screw. Lead was annoying; hard to keep the flint in place.
 

GREENSWLDE

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I Never use anything but Leather. Usually my well used old 5/8th Dog leads, skived down to 2mm. Fold and cut a V in the fold to back the flint against the cock screw. Best Black English flints. No failures. It's all a matter of Attention to Detail..
 

HawkLA

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I suppose if you wanted to stop the jaw from loosening while using lead, you could probably put a locking nut on the bottom of the tightening screw. Disclaimer, I don't own a flintlock.
The screw doesn't loosen the lead flatens out as it basically gets hammered when the flint hits the striker.
 

MtnMan

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I've tried lead once. I smashed down a ball. I had to keep tightening it at first but then it took a set and I didn't need to tighten anymore.
 

olskool

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i think it is chambers that warns against using lead. they say it can damage your frizzen,,,,,,,,,,,,
 

GREENSWLDE

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Like Dave say's the flash is upwards.That's why the bottom of the touch hole should be level with the top of the pan.. As for Leather I use my old dog leads Skived down to about 1/16th.They're soft and flexible and I have lots of @ 'em. OLD DOG (DEVA DOG WARE)
 

Art Caputo

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What is the reason for having the flint touch the screw
The size/shape of the flint, and it’s orientation to the strike window on the frizzen generally determines whether my flint rests against the cock screw. For example, using my Large Siler locks, with a 3/4”x7/8’ flint, the optimum position is when the flint rests directly against the cock screw. Using a shorter 3/4”x 3/4” flint, I will not notch the rear of the leather. I can’t say that I’ve ever had the flint slip back when the flint had good contact with the jaws and securely mounted. I generally prefer a longer flint resting against the cock screw that strikes the frizzen at the highest point on the contact window. In this case I can get longer effective flint life and knapping without removing/re-orienting the flint, before the strike point falls below the optimum window on the frizzen.
 

toot

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doesn't lead call for a void / cut out on the rear of the lead, where it makes contact with the top jaw screw? there must have been a purpose for that back in the day. in museum's as at TICONDEROGA at the museums, a lot of period weapons have lead & a cut out for the top jaw screw.
 

Grenadier1758

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Having the cut out whether it is for a lead wrap or a leather wrap, allows for a longer flint to be installed in the jaws. As the flint is knapped during use and moved out to be closer to the face of the frizzen after knapping, one flint will have longer life. This does work best when there are flats at the top and bottom of the flint.
 

MSW

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this question will plague the ML community in the future. as it has in the past.. as in, since the thing was first invented. some folks get all 'wrapped around the axle about it,' but i try to be more laid back about such issues ... DON'T get all upset and p.o. ed at the world - relax, run some ball, grab some powder, go to the range and make some smoke ... it's all good ...


i think that it is Chambers who won't warranty locks with lead flint wraps. some time ago, i mashed down some lead balls and made wraps for my flint, then i weighed the flint and the leather (this was for a T/C lock - ymmv) if memory serves, the lead was fifteen to twenty percent heavier (on my reloading scale, good to 1/10 grain) and one lead wrap was a little lighter than the heaviest leather.

just for pretty, i trim the leather so that it's pretty close to the shape of the jaws... without the overhang, the leather doesn't get scorched, and i think it makes for a neater appearance. but that's just me - you can do as you see fit.

if you go with lead, you will need to dry-fire the lock a few times and then retighten the jaws to completely seat the lead.

unless you're worried about the warranty issue, i'd go ahead and try it and see which system works best for you.

good luck with your project, and Make Good Smoke :)
 

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