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King Philips War Firearms

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Leadball loader

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also another good book on KING PHILIPS WAR is ASK NO QUARTER. written by the minister who was at SMITHS CASTLE as the survivors of the GREAT SWAMP FIGHT returned from the massacre of the NARRAGANSETT'S. I live one mile from the GREAT SWAMP where the great battle took place. in KINGSTON RI. it was in the winter on DEC. 16TH ,1675. one of the coldest on record. most of the troops died on the march back to COCUMCUSICKS, AKA. SMITH,S CASTLE, and buried in a common grave. including there leader CAPT. GALLUP, with his men.
If I remember correctly it was the fanatic need to destroy the Narragansett people that caused the deaths of the colonials. They burned the entire settlement food and shelter they could have used to make
It back to settled areas and paid for it by suffering great loss of life to the elements on the return journey.
 

Rudyard

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What fascinating posts .I spent time in Massachusetts and made up a snaphance gun thinking of King Phillips war but never found any group doing it so never got to re enact any as I would do had there been opportunity . I did make a long English lock piece for Tom Brown or Peter Gobbles I forget . but no idea where it ended up . I made a wheellock rifle it went to East Aurora NY. My snaphance went to Virginia, Via Marietta Oh. The early stuff was popular certainly appeals to me . Rudyard
 

toot

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Rudyard, yes there is a lot of war and history in NEW ENGLAND, you were my neighbor, I live in RHODE ISLAND, 76 years. were ROGER WILLIAMS came to after leaving MASSACHUSETTS. look at REVEREND BENJAMIN CHURCH,who came to RI. from MASSACHUSETTS BAY COLONY, leading a group of soldiers to do GODS WORK, KILLING INDIANS with a bible in one hand and a flintlock in the other! in the worst winter in history, DEC. 16 1675. many of the soldiers did indeed die on the return march back. they killed KING PHILIP and sold his wife and children as slaves, I beleave at the slave dock in NEWPORT, RI.
 

Irishmusket

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The matchlock musket was in general service in all of armies of Europe until the end of The 17 th century The English started adopting dog locks in The middle of 1690s and it became standard arm by 1700 it was gradually replaced by what we call the the Brown Bess around 1720/30s the olderDog locks went the Royal Navy &Marines the rest to Colonial forces around the same time.The Snaphaunce in 17 th century English colonies was used to describe any flintlock the most common type of flintlock was what we call the English lock and were some what common at the time known for going off half cocked these muskets saw service in the English civil war in the 1640 /50s and some ended up in the colonies.It is also known that locks were available in the colonies a some people had old matchlocks converted and whole new muskets were Built here .How ever the matchlocks were still being built in the colonies and newer improved matchlocks were also being sent here from England the latest improved versions and they well understood and relatively Iow priced and still considered a standard military arm of that day .The Matchlock was still the musket for the Military all over the world with all of its faults .France was still armed With matchlocks and did adopt a Standard Flintlock for there Army untill 1717 and good and reliable musket it was .The king Phillips war saw the use of early flintlocks real flint locks had not been perfected yet .The 17th century the matchlock era .The 18 th century was the era of the Flintlock
 

Canute Rex

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I have seen a photo of a matchlock musket from a Canadian museum that is attributed to the Regiment Carrignan in the 1660s. If you were out on the very end of the supply chain I suppose you took what you could get and were glad that it went bang. The 17th century was a mixed bag for firearm technology. By the last third of the century you could probably see four or five different types of locks being used at the same time.
 

Rudyard

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I have seen a photo of a matchlock musket from a Canadian museum that is attributed to the Regiment Carrignan in the 1660s. If you were out on the very end of the supply chain I suppose you took what you could get and were glad that it went bang. The 17th century was a mixed bag for firearm technology. By the last third of the century you could probably see four or five different types of locks being used at the same time.
Since 1660s was still in the era of common use of Matchlocks I wouldn't say they where too badly off when the European powers still had some matchlocks .around the 17th early 18th c . But then they wouldn't be worrying about adept nifty Indians with bows . That would be a good time to have firelocks of a more modern sort .
Regards Rudyard
 
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