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Zonie

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Speaking of St. Patties day, every year when I fix corned beef and cabbage I've put a bottle of Guinness in the pot. Later, when I ate my dinner, I never could taste any traces of the ale or its hops. It seemed to disappear.

After pondering this for maybe a half hour, coupling the idea that CV 19 doesn't like alcohol at all and the idea that since the ale seems to vanish, in the interest of saving my fellow mankind and enjoying myself at the same time I decided that this year, I will pour the Guinness into me. :D
 

Grenadier1758

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Just heard on new today that Guinness stops the speed of Coronavirus!!!!!!
:ghostly:
may you all be a half an hour in heaven ‘for the Devil knows your dead
Happy St Patties day all
Yeah, that works fine if you stay home and self isolate.

Just found out that the Trade Faire at Fort de Chartres is cancelled due to request from IDNR. That means the Trade Faire Tavern will be closed even if Guinness or Lemon Shrub can cure COVID-19.
 

Zonie

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WHAT? The tavern is closed?
Well, if you are willing to brave a visit to WallyMart, they have 12 packs of Guinness for sale at a reasonable price.
I think mandating that it is available is a part of the anti-CV19 treatment program brought to you by the Government.
 

tenngun

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Yeah, that works fine if you stay home and self isolate.

Just found out that the Trade Faire at Fort de Chartres is cancelled due to request from IDNR. That means the Trade Faire Tavern will be closed even if Guinness or Lemon Shrub can cure COVID-19.
Got invited last spring and it was closed due to flooding, now this. I would be stamping my foot and having a tantrum if I could.... in fact I might.
Well I took time off of work for it but job asked us not to travel next couple of weeks. I think I’ll trek a bit that weekend. Go break in my new waistcoat that I sewed up just for trade fair( foot stomping and whinny voice now).
 
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Tipped a Guinness and a harp with the corned beef and cabbage and potatoes, made a loaf of Irish soda bread to go with it for this evenings meal mighty fine indeed. God bless the Irish. So along the lines of the cure for the virus should be O.K. Seriously my wife also has Lupus this is a horrible disease been doing all we can to isolate, distance and de-contaminate to be careful with the potential for exposure. I have a gut feeling this one is going to take a lot of effort by everyone. Be careful out there it is a mean world, and do what you can for the older folks in your circle.
 

azmntman

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Smoked a nice pastrami Sunday and forgot it was to be eaten today and just hogged up some sausage and peppers. A day late will have to do. and dont forget....real Irish drink Coors Banquet!
 

bud in pa

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As was told to me many years ago corned beef was never used, they used Irish Bacon. Cows were used for milk and cheese. Corned beef was probably started by someone had to much Guinness!
 

Ames

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The horned toad says we should go to Mexico.
Speaking of St. Patties day, every year when I fix corned beef and cabbage I've put a bottle of Guinness in the pot. Later, when I ate my dinner, I never could taste any traces of the ale or its hops. It seemed to disappear.
You have to add the beer in the last 20 minutes or so. Same with smoked paprika into chili. The taste cooks out after 20.
Then you can pour the rest into you.o_O
 

Carbon 6

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The meal that became a St. Patrick’s Day staple across the country—corned beef and cabbage—was an American innovation. While ham and cabbage were eaten in Ireland, corned beef offered a cheaper substitute for impoverished immigrants. Irish-Americans living in the slums of lower Manhattan in the late 19th century and early 20th, purchased leftover corned beef from ships returning from the tea trade in China. The Irish would boil the beef three times—the last time with cabbage—to remove some of the brine.

Or so the story goes, but I have my own story.

From the arrival of poor Irish immigrants in the 1840's up through WW1, I posit that immigrants ate a lot of horse meat. Either knowingly or unknowingly, and that when corned "beef" and cabbage became popular in the early 1900's, it was likely made with horse meat.
In the 1890's horse drawn street cars were replaced with electric ones and for the next 20 years nearly all horse drawn carriages would be replaced by cars. As a result millions of horses were slaughtered and found their way into the food stream. Horse meat, described as lean, stringy, gamey or tasteless, probably fit the bill well for corning. Oh, and it was cheap.

The latest incidence of horse meat ending up in corned beef that I could find was in 2013 in England.

Since 2017 the Trump administration has tried twice to lift the ban on horse meat in the U.S.
So who knows, you might be eating "real" corned "beef" in the near future. :D
 

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