Quantcast

Jeremiah Johnson movie clothing

Help Support Muzzle Loading Forum:

lou puleff

32 Cal.
Joined
Mar 6, 2015
Messages
133
Reaction score
23
Location
Arizona
Going back in December for muzzleloader deer season though friends still live there
 

lou puleff

32 Cal.
Joined
Mar 6, 2015
Messages
133
Reaction score
23
Location
Arizona
I need to question your, "guys at the factory" since GRRW no longer exists and hasn't for a number of years Besides Doc, who are you talking to ? Inquiring minds want to know....
Well first of all this thread is about clothes not his rifle but if your going to challenge me about it like that I'll say read my responses his name is right there Ron paull he built my hawken rifle and trapper pistol for me so let's not turn this thread into a pissing match I know what he told me you don't!
 

Huntschool

40 Cal
MLF Supporter
Joined
Nov 14, 2018
Messages
325
Reaction score
117
Location
Southernmost Illinois (6.5 hours South of Chicago)
Whoa there big boy...… I was just asking the question as it read. Not challenging any one. I was just interested to hear who was still around. I saw Ron's name but you said "folks at the factory" or something to that effect so I thought I would ask. If it came across as a challenge that was not my intent... sorry.
 

lou puleff

32 Cal.
Joined
Mar 6, 2015
Messages
133
Reaction score
23
Location
Arizona
Whoa there big boy...… I was just asking the question as it read. Not challenging any one. I was just interested to hear who was still around. I saw Ron's name but you said "folks at the factory" or something to that effect so I thought I would ask. If it came across as a challenge that was not my intent... sorry.
No worries sometime these threads get out of hand ! As I am remembering he said a few of the guys had a part in building the rifle doc says it's still hanging on the wall of Redfords place in Provo I would love to see that gun !
 

Tanglefoot

Pilgrim
Joined
Aug 18, 2012
Messages
328
Reaction score
258
Location
Texas
Bruce,
Just remembered your earlier comment. The rifle presented to Heston at LaVeta was a Santa Fe Hawken.
 

Tanglefoot

Pilgrim
Joined
Aug 18, 2012
Messages
328
Reaction score
258
Location
Texas
Yep. From Western Arms. He also scored a hawk-`n-knife set from The Hawken Shop (Art Ressel) and Victoria was given a necklace of antique Blue Chevrons and Padres. It was getting dark and none of my snapshots came out. Thanks for the good wishes .... Still warmish here - mid-90's.
 

Tanglefoot

Pilgrim
Joined
Aug 18, 2012
Messages
328
Reaction score
258
Location
Texas
Gentlemen,
My apologies. Somewhere along the line we lost track of the conversation, from swapping info on Redford's clothing to the rifle Charleton Heston got after The Mountainmen came out. Two different actors and two different rifles --- but my apology is for MY error. I said that the half-stock percussion rifle Redford used in Jeremiah Johnson was a "CVA with a brass shim between the buttstock and forend ... " Several production rifles were either used in the movie or appeared in some of the publicity shots. One was as I described, but I think that was in a publicity shot or a poster. My copy of the movie is sitting forlornly on a shelf because the player ain't working, so I can't check. The rifle Heston got was indeed a Western Arms "Santa Fe Hawken" but he didn't receive it until after the movie premier was shown. Sorry for the confustion on my part .... my memory is still as good as it ever was, but a lot shorter.
 

Bighorserider

36 Cl.
Joined
Apr 20, 2013
Messages
94
Reaction score
39
The thing about the Hawken shop is that they were in St Louis and while they are mainly remembered for fur trade guns which were usually .50 and up they also built guns for use locally. They tended to be smaller smaller caliber.
 

Dale Lilly

45 Cal.
MLF Supporter
Joined
Apr 9, 2012
Messages
573
Reaction score
665
Along with this thread I have two questions: 1. Why is there no discussion of corduroy in any of the discussion? It is certainly documented from records of the time? and 2. Does anyone know of leathers other than deer/elk/buffalo, etc being used for coats/pants in St. Louis or elsewhere and taken to the Rockies during the MM era? Polecat
 

tenngun

Cannon
MLF Supporter
Joined
Jan 27, 2008
Messages
14,481
Reaction score
5,626
Location
Republic mo
Along with this thread I have two questions: 1. Why is there no discussion of corduroy in any of the discussion? It is certainly documented from records of the time? and 2. Does anyone know of leathers other than deer/elk/buffalo, etc being used for coats/pants in St. Louis or elsewhere and taken to the Rockies during the MM era? Polecat
Horse hair on coats were seen. They couldn’t split skin then so thick hides were hard to use for clothing. Sheep skin was also common, wool on for winter. Goat and calf was common pants leather, but deer was cheaper. Tailors in St Louis made deer skin clothing for sale to men going west. Tailor made skin clothing was also made in Taos, Santa Fe and ive read there was a tailor at Bents fort, but I read that so many years ago I couldn’t tell you where so that’s pretty iffy.
Cord was just coming in to style as a working man’s cloth. Previous to this time it was more of a gentleman’s rough wear.
 

Notchy Bob

32 Cal.
Joined
Apr 6, 2014
Messages
844
Reaction score
1,040
Location
Florida
Had a exact replica hat made out of beaver now I'm looking for the material to have the coat made does anyone know what those pants are he was wearing I know they have the stripe running down the side
Gosh, a "dead thread" resurrected! Which is great, because I missed it the first time around. I enjoyed reading the three pages of discussion.

I looked it up, and found Jeremiah Johnson was released in May, 1972. I remember reading a magazine article about it later that year, sitting in the library of Santa Fe Community College in Gainesville, Florida, where I was a freshman. For an 18 year old kid, I might have been a little better informed than much of the general public, having read every single one of John Baird's "Hawken Rifles" articles in Muzzle Blasts magazine, in addition to John Barsotti's "Mountain Men and Mountain Rifles" in back issues of Gun Digest, and anything else I could find in my dad's trove of old gun magazines and in the libraries. In any event, I contrived to see the movie on the big screen, which was the only option at the time, and I enjoyed it. Inaccuracies in weaponry notwithstanding. This thread takes me back. It was only later that I read the books on which the movie was based.

This afternoon, I researched it a little bit. There is a nice write-up about the movie on the International Movie DataBase (IMDB) website. That source indicates Redford/Johnson's trousers were indeed supposed to be military-type from the Mexican War, although the trousers he was wearing in the movie evidently had a zipper!

There was some discussion in this thread about Redford/Johnson's rifle, with some speculation that it had been made by Green River Rifle Works (GRRW). I don't think this is likely, or even possible. Doc White's website indicates GRRW was founded in Doc's garage in March, 1972. The movie was released in May, 1972, after 7-1/2 months of editing, not to mention the actual filming. The chronology of events just doesn't support GRRW having anything to do with Jeremiah Johnson. I looked at some still images from the movie today, and honestly can't say what kind of rifle it is, although the trigger guard looks like the type you see on some of the cheaper imports, and there isn't much about it that appears consistent with any kind of Hawken, whether by Jake and Sam or Thompson Center. The various still images may show more than one rifle, but the one most frequently associated with Redford's role in this film appears to be a half stock with an unusually massive forend cap.

Of interest to me was a still photo showing Redford with an enormous long-barreled horse pistol, evidently a smoothbore. I have forgotten many of the details of the movie, and didn't remember anything about that.

There is reality, and there is cinema. I try not to take movies too seriously. Many among us try very hard to use historically correct guns and gear, and I applaud the effort. However, I don't disrespect those who take a sincere interest in the gear used in historically significant (if not historically accurate) movies. I'm sure Jeremiah Johnson got a lot of people started in shooting muzzleloaders and buckskinning, and it reinforced or validated the interest some people already had. The movie itself is historically significant, in its own right. I am sure assembling an outfit just like Redford wore as Jeremiah Johnson can be rewarding in its own way. Good on you, brother!

Best regards,

Notchy Bob
 

Dale Lilly

45 Cal.
MLF Supporter
Joined
Apr 9, 2012
Messages
573
Reaction score
665
Horse hair on coats were seen. They couldn’t split skin then so thick hides were hard to use for clothing. Sheep skin was also common, wool on for winter. Goat and calf was common pants leather, but deer was cheaper. Tailors in St Louis made deer skin clothing for sale to men going west. Tailor made skin clothing was also made in Taos, Santa Fe and ive read there was a tailor at Bents fort, but I read that so many years ago I couldn’t tell you where so that’s pretty iffy.
Cord was just coming in to style as a working man’s cloth. Previous to this time it was more of a gentleman’s rough wear.
An invoice for Sundry Merchandise of the Rocky Mountain Outfit from 1836 lists: 22 Pairs of Corderoy [sic] pants.
Of interest also: that Inventory of Sundry merchandise lists 10 Hawken rifles at $24 each with total of $240.
That's a very expensive rifle. Polecat
 

tenngun

Cannon
MLF Supporter
Joined
Jan 27, 2008
Messages
14,481
Reaction score
5,626
Location
Republic mo
Leman Rifles were about fourteen. Twenty four was about a months wages
Seems they sold in the mountains for about a hundred
 
Top