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azsixshooter

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Good deal, I 've heard of lead from many sources, but hammers? Just out of curiosity what were the lead hammers used for ,in your shop I mean?

We have an injection molding dept at the shop where I work and I was told those guys used to use the big lead hammers to knock their parts out of the molds. I'm a 5 axis cnc machinist so sometimes we use hammers like that to tap fixtures around when we are indicating them in. Generally I use dead blow hammers anymore though.
 

Nessmuck56

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I've gotten the flinter bug bad.... started off with a .50 cal TC Renegade percussion 20 years ago, picked up a .45 percussion traditions kit..... THEN started noticing how stylish the flintlocks looked, picked up a .54 GPR flint, quickly picked up a 2nd .54 GPR Flint and got a.36 cal flint for Christmas! !!!! Wish I'd started with flinters 20 years ago!!!!!! To each their own!
And now our cap locks collect dust....
 

Critter Getter

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I'm assuming you can learn the basics of muzzleloading and blackpowder from a percussion model. Then graduate to flintlocks? Is flintlock shooting that much differant from percussion?
For me............YES! I love the flinters and they can be aggravating and all so satisfying! The biggest problem is all me as the flinters I have are all very good quality rifles. They are a lot of fun. Greg :)
 

Eutycus

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It sounds like theres a whole lot more to shooting flintlocks than there is in using percussions. I hear terms like "angle of the flint", "prime the pan" "touchhole" etc. And it sounds like there is alot extra that needs to be learned. But I bet it would be fun!
 

Critter Getter

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It sounds like theres a whole lot more to shooting flintlocks than there is in using percussions. I hear terms like "angle of the flint", "prime the pan" "touchhole" etc. And it sounds like there is alot extra that needs to be learned. But I bet it would be fun!
I don’t really think there is a whole lot more to shooting a flintlock compared to a percussion lock gun..........now shooting them as accurate as a percussion gun may be a whole different subject! . They can be very accurate but the shooter may need a little work! Greg
 
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I just like the fact that I don't have to worry about running out of caps or a misplaced capper. If you lose your caps, it's time to head for the house! I run the same powder in the pan as I do for the load, so I don't have to worry about losing my priming horn.
 

smo

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It sounds like theres a whole lot more to shooting flintlocks than there is in using percussions. I hear terms like "angle of the flint", "prime the pan" "touchhole" etc. And it sounds like there is alot extra that needs to be learned. But I bet it would be fun!

The principals basically the same ,
But too me as much different as day light and darkness..

A fun learning curve however, I’m only ten years in and still learning.
 

mikek793

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Thanks everyone for all the kind words. I have done some minor woodworking, mostly carving Swedish spoons and I made a special curved handle for my hewing axe. I also carved a handle for a Mora 120 blank out of wild black cherry so now I have that nice little carving knife. I have mostly Nicholson files and one of their file card brushes. I always chalk my files up when I use them so they are in pretty good shape. Mine are all general purpose files though, nothing specialty like the Cabinetry one mentioned above, I'll have to look into that. I was looking at some Swiss needle file kits and thinking that might be a worthwhile purchase but the good ones sure cost a pretty penny! I'm a total knife nut so I have plenty of good Arkansas bench stones such as translucent pink and surgical black grades. I also have a Ken Onion Work Sharp with the stropping belt and some manual strops I made from scrap bridle leather. I would like to get some good quality chisels and carving knives, but for now I'll have to make due with hardware store quality. Thanks for the suggestions and I'll be sure to add that Peter Alexander book to my amazon cart tonight. I made the mistake of watching Denny Ducet's video on the Jacob Dickert rifle. Holy wah, I'm in trouble now!
You definitely want to get Peter Alexander's book. I started building about six years ago starting with a Traditions 50 cal. Kentucky rifle kit. At 340$ it let me get my feet wet.Then I was truly addicted and got a pre-carved Tennessee mountain rifle stock and barrel. Ordered the rest of the parts from Track of the Wolf except the Durrs Egg lock, made the patchbox,trigger and plate,buttplate,and trigger guard myself.54 cal. Then I got a plank, ordered a swamped barrel,50 cal., B weight and am building a J.P. Beck style rifle.Sure am glad I got that book! Have fun. Mike from s.e. Arizona.
 

azsixshooter

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I got the book and Hershel House's DVD "Building Hawken Rifles". Both resources are amazing and I'm getting a lot out of them even now. I just about have my triggerguard finished, I could probably brown it now the way it is. I am going to finish sanding the rest of the metal pieces then start working on the wood. I think the inletting is pretty good already and I don't know if I'll need to do any significant chisel work at all. I am thinking I should shoot it a few times and then pull the lock off and see if it is inletted tight enough to keep carbon fouling from getting between the lock and the mortise. Plus, that is a good excuse to get out and shoot this smokepole! My friend went to a Living History show in Kalamazoo, MI today and he picked me up a pound of FF powder since there aren't any stores near me that carry real black powder. I got 100 Hornady .530" balls so other than some kind of patch material I'm ready to go. My buddy who got me the powder already gave me a brass powder measure and a ball starter too.
 
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azsixshooter, you've got it bad... if about a year, i'd say, you'll be going on about rate of twist and drop-at-comb, and your friends and co- workers will worry about your mental health, with you becoming so excited about sharp bots of rock. don't worry, they just don't 'get it.'

to paraphrase the little green stars wars guy, "once rocks banged have you, forever will they dominate your range time."

i'll skip my usual advice about sharp tools, don't buy cheap tools, don't buy 'sets' of tools and keep tools super sharp, inasmuch as you already have those issues well in hand, as nearly as I can tell.

I would, however, urge you with great vigor to look into Dutch Schoultz method for wringing out amazing accuracy out of your new rifle.

here's a link: http://blackpowderrifleaccuracy.com/

Make Good Smoke:)
 
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Keep in mind some will tell you the only way you can fully appreciate the hobby is to build your own rifle from scratch, plus make your own horn, bag, etc. etc.

That might be true for some people, but I have not found that to be the case. Don’t be afraid to buy your stuff outright and go make smoke! Trust me, you’ll have plenty of fun that way as well!!
 

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