Is this stain a good choice?

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simonbeans

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This thread about staining Walnut has been interesting. When I made a double flint shotgun a couple of years ago, I had the same thoughts of how to stain it. After discussion with a gun builder buddy, I decided to NOT stain it at all as he had said that the walnut will darken with just a finish on it. Knowing the open grain of walnut, I used Birchwood Casey wood filler and after a couple of coats, doing as recommended, lightly sanding with very fine paper, finished with BC Tru-Oil, again using a fine abrasive cloth between 4 or 5 coats. I like the lighter color of the natural Walnut and the slight sheen of the Tru-Oil.



First photo natural light:





This photo, flash fill:

 

TXFlynHog

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I've come to the decision that I'll NOT be able to order any products ahead of time, given how I see so many suggestions telling me to wet my (completed) stock to see how it looks wet. I have only just begun this project, so I'm still weeks away from being at that stage. Nevertheless, I've learned a lot so far and will read and re-read this thread multiple times before making any finishing decisions!
 

jae

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I have had pretty fair results using leather dye for a stain .I like a stain darker than I want the colour to end up being. I add meths to the dye to lighten the colour. Also I find the barrel channel a good place to check and adjust the colour until I`m happy with it jae












I
 

Stumpkiller

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I don't mind the boiled linseed oil finish. Doesn't peel, doesn't crack or craze, holds up well in the woods. Have several and have refinished several mil. surplus rifles using it (Lee-Enfields came with some kind of raw linseed oil finish - don't go down that path).

Two tricks with boiled linseed oil. Thin the first two applications 50/50 with either mineral spirits or turpentine. After it sets 15 to 20 minutes wipe it off with a cotton rag (this is important) and then let it dry overnight. From there:
Once a day for a week
Once a week for a month
Once a month for a year
Once a year for life.

And remember - wipe off anything that doesn't dry in 20 minutes after applying each coat of the boiled linseed oil.

I also like to annually wax the rifle with Bri-Wax. Its a carnuba wax (I use rustic pine or ebony depending whether the rifle is light of dark wood). If you have relief carving the ebony really "snaps" the pattern and give a patina grunge look of age. This is walnut, no stain, but following the two initial coats with 50/50 mineral spirits & boiles linseed oil method.
HPIM1005.JPG
 

TXFlynHog

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Guys--
I posted another question related to this kit build in another thread on this forum, but then it occurred to me that I should have posted it here, since I'm pretty much finished with the metal work on that build, and now moving slowly on the stock.

Here' a link to my new question about a black spot that I have on my wood, and how I might go about removing it (if possible):



Appreciate any advice you may have with this sort of thing..
 

lou puleff

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Guys--
I posted another question related to this kit build in another thread on this forum, but then it occurred to me that I should have posted it here, since I'm pretty much finished with the metal work on that build, and now moving slowly on the stock.

Here' a link to my new question about a black spot that I have on my wood, and how I might go about removing it (if possible):



Appreciate any advice you may have with this sort of thing..
Hard to tell but is the mark on the surface or does it have any depth to it ? I'm guessing but you will probably have to just sand it out if it's a tool mark ?
 

TXFlynHog

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Hard to tell but is the mark on the surface or does it have any depth to it ? I'm guessing but you will probably have to just sand it out if it's a tool mark ?
I agree--it does look like it's a bit of a dent there, but it actually is perfectly smooth, and I've sanded it quite a bit already with no effect on the mark. I could keep sanding, and I guess I'll try that for a little, but wondered if others have seen this kind of mark on a piece of American Walnut before... perhaps just a "feature" of the wood, rather than a blemish due to tooling or whatnot.
 

lou puleff

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I agree--it does look like it's a bit of a dent there, but it actually is perfectly smooth, and I've sanded it quite a bit already with no effect on the mark. I could keep sanding, and I guess I'll try that for a little, but wondered if others have seen this kind of mark on a piece of American Walnut before... perhaps just a "feature" of the wood, rather than a blemish due to tooling or whatnot.
Unfortunately with wood not much you can do sometimes hopefully you can just remove and reshape it on both sides to match if you can send a few more pics to look at ?
 

TXFlynHog

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image.jpg
I was able to reduce the spot by sanding, but I’m afraid that I’m left with this little spot here because it just runs too deep and I’d create a bit of a gouge to sand this out.
 

lou puleff

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View attachment 32666
I was able to reduce the spot by sanding, but I’m afraid that I’m left with this little spot here because it just runs too deep and I’d create a bit of a gouge to sand this out.
What kit is that can you see if they can give you a new piece of wood or can you do a brass escutcheon or inlay around the barrel pin ?
 

TXFlynHog

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I’ve got the wood all shaved and sanded down to 400 grain now. Thinking seriously about the yellow dye then BC Tru Oil to seal it but I’ve never worked with dye. Assume that (per above) I coat it with the dye, then sand lightly to remove the fuzzies that it brings up, then just apply the Tru Oil
 

TXFlynHog

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What kit is that can you see if they can give you a new piece of wood or can you do a brass escutcheon or inlay around the barrel pin ?
These pin holes are for the brass pieces that hold the ram rod.
I had to get two replacement trigger guards for this kit already due to bad cast pours, poor fit, and air holes in the brass. I’m afraid that I’ve probably “used up” my good will with Dixie Gun Works to try for a replacement stock.
 

lou puleff

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I would recommend watching a few videos theres a guy on you tube he goes by Kurt's gunstocks he has several good videos on stock finish
 

lou puleff

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These pin holes are for the brass pieces that hold the ram rod.
I had to get two replacement trigger guards for this kit already due to bad cast pours, poor fit, and air holes in the brass. I’m afraid that I’ve probably “used up” my good will with Dixie Gun Works to try for a replacement stock.
Wont hurt to ask but if your that bothered can some carving possibly hide or help ?
 

TXFlynHog

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Wont hurt to ask but if your that bothered can some carving possibly hide or help ?
I think I’m going to live with it. I pretty much removed as much wood here as I think is possible, and I’m not skilled enough to carve. Hopefully the dye will soften the blemish a little, and eventually I’ll not see it so bluntly.
 

Nutnfancy

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On my T/C Renegade kit gun I used High Speed Linseed Oil first, it slightly darkened the wood but brought out the grain. Since then I've applied Bore Butter after cleaning to the barrel and stock. Recently I applied a couple of coats of Tung Oil after doing some stock repair/touch up. The last time I shot it I coated the stock with Bore Butter after cleaning.

The point: it doesn't seem to matter what you apply to the stock after cleaning as long as you are basically using something oil based or something similar and compatible with oil based finishes. Basically what you are doing is nothing more than applying something to protect the wood and prevent it from drying out. I don't know how this process would work with varnish, shellac, polyurethane, spars urethane or the like, never tried it. Maybe someone else will chime in with their experience.
 
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