Is there printed route of the Oregon trail?

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Scarface

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I don't care about the Oregon trail in itself, I just want to trace the route the the fur traders took to green river country next time I go hunting in WY.


It's just easier to say Oregon trail, and folks know what your talking about.


View attachment 69334
What is known as the Oregon Trail is one way the Fur Trappers used. The Oregon Trail was on the South side of the Platte River. Through Nebraska and Wyoming to the Sweetwater. The Mormon Trail stayed on the North side. The early days of the Fur Trade the Missouri River was the main route into what is now Montana. Another route was to follow the South Platte to what is now the area of Ft. Collins, CO. They then went North into the Laramie Valley, essentially what is now known as the Overland Trail. In western Wyoming the Oregon Trail went down to Ft. Bridger, but there was also the Lander cutoff that went through the Wyoming Range.
 

The Crisco Kid

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Red Owl

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there are quite a few diaries on folks traveling the route. I think you just follw the rivers, etc.-for the most part. At least up to the Rockies- from there on- not sure.
 

Notchy Bob

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This is a very good read. I'm a little biased since 2 of my ancestors, both my Dad's and Mother's, were on this train. Both of them are mentioned. I have my 4G grandfathers 40 caliber halfstock percussion rifle that he carried on the trip.

That looks like a nice book. My own ancestors were settled down on subsistence farms in southeast Alabama in 1845, but the early western frontier has always interested me. I think it's pretty cool that your ancestors were on that trip, and were mentioned in the book. Obviously, they were among the survivors, or you wouldn't be with us today! Talk about "the right stuff"... Those old pioneers had it.

It would be great to see some pictures of your rifle, and to hear a little more about it. Those old half-stocked percussion rifles don't have the cachet of flintlock longrifles or French fusils, but they got the job done. They put a lot of meat in the pot, and helped protect a lot of families. Having that one in your family, with solid provenance and an unbroken chain of custody, makes it a real treasure.

Best regards,

Notchy Bob
 
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You can drive part of the Oregon Trail from St Mary, KS as far as he Vermillion River, where the was originally a ford and later a steel bridge. It's along a modern gravel road with steep hills on the more northerly side and the broad Kansas River Valley on the opposite side. I'm not sure how much of the road actually follows the trail beyond the Vermillion.
 

Ranch 13

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Hiway 26 basically follows the trail from Scottsbluff to Casper, then hi way 220 from Casper west to the Beaver Rim. Keep in mind the general route is more or less mapped out, but the trail itself is several miles wide. They traveled where there was grass, and tried to stay near water. Some cut off in various places and took, what was supposed to be better grass. There was a group a few years ago pretty convinced that a number of groups left the Platte at Ogalla and followed Lodge Pole Creek and then went over the southern Laramie range. The legend of the Rawhide , comes from a group that left the Platte and headed north towards the Niobrara, when one of them killed a young Indian girl, the group turned the offending fella over and he proceeded to be skinned alive somewhere near Rawhide Butte. Nebraska state rd 92 follows the route that was established by the quarter master at Fort Laramie to save 3-4 days for supply trains going to and from the fort.
 

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Del Gue

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It still happens a lot. It's a proper noun, they can spell it anyway they want. I ran into it a lot when I would work in the 'hood.
 

bptactical

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Not on "The Trail" but-
My Godfather had a huge cattle operation just east of Cody, Wyoming. Every summer for about a week my dad and I would go up and visit and catch up with old friends (my dad was a veterinarian who had a practice in Cody).
We would go camping and fishing on the Godfathers place.
Nothing like being 12 years old and spending tentless nights in old tepee rings under the stars.

I swear at times you could feel it.
 
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Where at?


I spent a lot of time in the Oregon Basin chasing coyotes when I lived in Cody.
 

Red Owl

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I don't care about the Oregon trail in itself, I just want to trace the route the the fur traders took to green river country next time I go hunting in WY.


It's just easier to say Oregon trail, and folks know what your talking about.


View attachment 69334
I think you would do best to read the diaries of the trappers that covered that area. Things change over time and some diaries are vague in areas but that is likely your best bet. They had to have water for themselves and the horses. The Wind River range was sort of the Divider, they had to either go on the east or west side and did both. Pinedale is a really great place, markers of the rondy sites, great mountains, a ton of pronghorn and mule deer. I think one morning just driving along I counted 100 mule deer and maybe 150 pronghorn. There are a lot of small creeks around Pinedale, all once packed with beaver.
 

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